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Red-eyed tree frogs and their frog-flies: recruitment and colonization

Red-eyed tree frogs and their frog-flies: recruitment and colonization

Posted Wed, 25 Jul 2012 11:49:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

When a dead red eyed tree frog's egg is used as food by fly larvae, that is an important part of the decomposition of living material. Frog flies tend to choose dead eggs but can lay on others that are healthy nearby.

Red-eyed tree frogs and their frog-flies: recruitment and colonization

The Frankenstein Medusoid Jellyfish

The Frankenstein Medusoid Jellyfish

Posted Tue, 24 Jul 2012 12:47:33 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A new species of jelly? Well of sorts; Medusoid, the artificial jellyfish. Medusoid is a piece of silicone and some bits of heart muscle and is named after the sexual phase of jellyfish.

The Frankenstein Medusoid Jellyfish

Improving electronics by investigating dolphin sonar capabilities

Improving electronics by investigating dolphin sonar capabilities

Posted Wed, 18 Jul 2012 11:36:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The use of algorithms to solve equations has been extended to theorising as to how on earth dolphins cope with their advanced sonar in 'bubbly' conditions they create themselves. No solutions exactly to such a complex problem, but a meeting of mind: human and dolphin - and electronics.

Improving electronics by investigating dolphin sonar capabilities

O'Sun Nomad portable solar light system

O'Sun Nomad portable solar light system

Posted Mon, 16 Jul 2012 07:47:13 GMT by Adrian Bishop

The O'SUN NOMAD solar lamp was designed by Alain Gilles to help provide a portable eco-friendly lighting system for use in developing countries and for those without access to electricity.

O'Sun Nomad portable solar light system

Fish 'Guilds' dependent on habitat selection

Fish 'Guilds' dependent on habitat selection

Posted Wed, 11 Jul 2012 13:19:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Study on fish guilds in the Bristol Channel, UK. New data shows that large-bodied fish species dominate protected areas of habitat and in open water habitats, where the schooling of fish may help protect them against predation, there are larger numbers of smaller fish. The study explains why some fish species are more numerous than others and why this can vary across different types of habitat.

Fish 'Guilds' dependent on habitat selection

Higgs boson-like particle discovery is missing one more link

Higgs boson-like particle discovery is missing one more link

Posted Wed, 04 Jul 2012 14:32:11 GMT by Dave Armstrong

CERN scientists working at the Large Hadron Collider may have seen the missing Higgs boson or 'god particle'.

Higgs boson-like particle discovery is missing one more link

Who are the most successful primates? - well, us, just!

Who are the most successful primates? - well, us, just!

Posted Mon, 02 Jul 2012 17:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A study of the rhesus macaque and primate genetic diversity. The diversity of primates is legion, but within each species is a diversity that has enabled them to conquer continents, forest, scrub and mountain environments.

Who are the most successful primates? - well, us, just!

What dolphin genes show us about convergent intelligence

What dolphin genes show us about convergent intelligence

Posted Wed, 27 Jun 2012 17:33:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A new research study on the the molecular landscape of brain evolution and cognition of dolphins has been published today.

What dolphin genes show us about convergent intelligence

Human ancestors had teeth chemistry like giraffes

Human ancestors had teeth chemistry like giraffes

Posted Wed, 27 Jun 2012 16:00:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Human ancestors two million years ago ate plants, including bark, and had teeth chemistry like giraffes, new research suggests.

Human ancestors had teeth chemistry like giraffes

Macro or mega, it's still ecology

Macro or mega, it's still ecology

Posted Thu, 21 Jun 2012 14:32:10 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A new essay published in PLoS ONE looks at macroecology and sustainability. Humans are constrained by the systems that operate within the planet earth's ecological framework. Ecology has always been a minor partner in human endeavours, but seems to be the crucial one for us now.

Macro or mega, it's still ecology

Elephant pregnancy is unique

Elephant pregnancy is unique

Posted Tue, 19 Jun 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Elephant pregnancy lasts for 22 months. At up to 680 days (average 647 days), elephants have the longest gestation period on earth. New research, published in Biological Sciences, investigates.

Elephant pregnancy is unique

Archaea live long and slowly

Archaea live long and slowly

Posted Sat, 02 Jun 2012 19:03:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

T-Rex came and went, then mammals ruled, all the while the single-celled archaeon persisted with its slow growth lifestyle. Distantly related to bacteria, archaea have the slowest growth rate known to date.

Archaea live long and slowly

Super-eruptions may only take hundreds of years to form

Super-eruptions may only take hundreds of years to form

Posted Wed, 30 May 2012 21:00:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Volcanic super-eruptions, with the potential to wipe out huge populations, could take just hundreds of years to form rather than the 100,000 previously thought, say American geologists.

Super-eruptions may only take hundreds of years to form

Sex determination in birds

Sex determination in birds

Posted Tue, 29 May 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The ZZW hen is female to start with but develops male characteristics and produces no fertile gametes (eggs OR sperm). Except that is for the ZZW Kentish plover, noted in the study of sex determination in birds.

Sex determination in birds

Earthquakes are always big news - or are they?

Earthquakes are always big news - or are they?

Posted Sat, 26 May 2012 11:02:39 GMT by Michael Evans

Earthquake prediction is an inexact science and the recent Italian earthquake has highlighted the danger of not taking adequate precautions. An Anglo-Russian satelite programme hopes to be able to use electromagnetic signals as a means of early warning.

Earthquakes are always big news - or are they?

Placentals ruled before the Cretaceous

Placentals ruled before the Cretaceous

Posted Thu, 24 May 2012 12:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Theropod dinosaurs ruled the earth then died out in the Cretaceous, leaving the little mammals to diversify. Many genomes are now examinable for signs of diversification in these species' past.

Placentals ruled before the Cretaceous

Scitech News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

Marmosets are marvelous !

Posted Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:01:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

How techy is Eric?

Posted Fri, 11 Jul 2014 16:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Latest on your blood

Posted Thu, 03 Jul 2014 08:05:19 GMT by JW Dowey

Foxy moves for successful species

Posted Wed, 11 Jun 2014 08:37:43 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Finding sheep 'geneius' in their genome

Posted Fri, 06 Jun 2014 06:28:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Saving bees with new pesticide

Posted Wed, 04 Jun 2014 10:34:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Butterfly eyespots have potential

Posted Wed, 28 May 2014 11:29:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Common species are most important in ecosystems

Posted Tue, 27 May 2014 10:13:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Risk it, even if you’re a shy great tit!

Posted Wed, 14 May 2014 09:59:01 GMT by Paul Robinson

Nightingale's number one!

Posted Mon, 05 May 2014 09:46:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

New way to assess chance of 'life' on other planets

Posted Wed, 23 Nov 2011 08:56:57 GMT by Adrian Bishop

LED street lights save millions each year

Posted Thu, 10 May 2012 19:16:22 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Cretacean murder mystery solved, or is it?

Posted Tue, 09 Oct 2012 14:43:38 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Mammal Evolution: Mouse to elephant-size in 24 million generations

Posted Tue, 31 Jan 2012 17:47:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

NASA Aquarius satellite maps ocean salinity

Posted Sun, 25 Sep 2011 03:10:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Flying and genome size: it’s true about the reduction!

Posted Tue, 28 Jan 2014 20:03:42 GMT by Colin Ricketts

More power from spinach

Posted Tue, 04 Sep 2012 18:03:37 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Novel Photography from The Barrier Reef

Posted Wed, 26 Sep 2012 14:50:17 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Elephant v. Man

Posted Wed, 14 Dec 2011 09:54:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Young scientists float new carbon capture plans - Updated

Posted Thu, 15 Sep 2011 17:05:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts