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Tallest penguins ever are discovered

Tallest penguins ever are discovered

Posted Tue, 05 Aug 2014 08:55:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

The giant penguins are on the march. There are now several recognised species, each with a different niche connected with the food-rich Antarctic seas. The newest species benefits from having more fossil remains than most, so we can hope to see more remains in the future, giving us better ideas on how these amazing birds looked, evolved and why they died out, millions of years ago.

Tallest penguins ever are discovered

Marmosets are marvelous !

Marmosets are marvelous !

Posted Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:01:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

The study of human relatives goes far beyond the simian primates, but this species is the smallest and probably the most unique of all our closer relatives. It’s also American, which brings genomics into the New World for the first time as far as monkeys are concerned.

Marmosets are marvelous !

How techy is Eric?

How techy is Eric?

Posted Fri, 11 Jul 2014 16:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We are all media people now, apart from those who have given up on the world. Now even they have been counted and placed in databases for a future with Big Brother- unless we are very careful with our freedoms. Our data should be free, but not too free, even Google’s recent experience with blocks proves that.

How techy is Eric?

Latest on your blood

Latest on your blood

Posted Thu, 03 Jul 2014 08:05:19 GMT by JW Dowey

The high level of profits from medical research and the possibilities of new sciences and technologies stretch our imagination, here in the office, at least. Now a distant and very ancient ancestor has very obviously given us, through simple breeding, a wonderful solution to survival at altitude. Who knows how climbers or even space travellers could benefit as we use our new knowledge?

Latest on your blood

Foxy moves for successful species

Foxy moves for successful species

Posted Wed, 11 Jun 2014 08:37:43 GMT by Colin Ricketts

What a turn up for the book. The Arctic fox didn't evolve from Eurasian or North American relatives. Instead, the climates of the Himalaya and Arctic were at one time similar enough to encourage migration in several animals. This species of fox must now be counted as related to an extinct animal that adapted thousands of kilometres away to mountainous terrain that resembles its present niche.

Foxy moves for successful species

Finding sheep 'geneius' in their genome

Finding sheep 'geneius' in their genome

Posted Fri, 06 Jun 2014 06:28:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

What can we make of the revelations on how species are really related to each other - or not? Big business will certainly cash in on the wool or any wool substitute alternative, just as spider silk is building into a stiff competitor. We all benefit from the science that informs, with Open wherever possible, and creates almost automatic advances in our culture. The sheep has been with us from the beginning of settlements and still looks likely to give us information on how we have eaten and kept warm and how domestic animals have changed, not always for our convenience.

Finding sheep 'geneius' in their genome

Saving bees with new pesticide

Saving bees with new pesticide

Posted Wed, 04 Jun 2014 10:34:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

The need for a pesticide for farmers and others that excludes pollinators and other useful insects from its action is desperate. We prefer not to kill any non-pest. But the loss of potentially all our bees is a risk that only chemical companies have been willing to take.

Saving bees with new pesticide

Butterfly eyespots have potential

Butterfly eyespots have potential

Posted Wed, 28 May 2014 11:29:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

How relevant is research for our everyday lives, the answer is not at all in this case, but the potential is so great we had to bring this to your attention.

Butterfly eyespots have potential

Common species are most important in ecosystems

Common species are most important in ecosystems

Posted Tue, 27 May 2014 10:13:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The abyss and the intertidal zone share ecological characteristics with all known marine ecosystems. They simply use their abundant animas as providers of shelter and many other functions. Rare species have a lesser role within the community.

Common species are most important in ecosystems

Risk it, even if you’re a shy great tit!

Risk it, even if you’re a shy great tit!

Posted Wed, 14 May 2014 09:59:01 GMT by Paul Robinson

Personality in great tits stretches as far as deciding whether to risk your life for your eggs. Would you go back home if somebody seems to threaten your cosy little nest in some unknown way? Insights into survival, evolution of boldness, domesticity and even our own reactions to stress can be found here!

Risk it, even if you’re a shy great tit!

Nightingale's number one!

Nightingale's number one!

Posted Mon, 05 May 2014 09:46:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

We love the muse of Beethoven, Shakespeare and Keats. But as we tend to lose their habitat, many will never have the chance to hear what has now been verified as the richest song in the bird world. Long live the little brown bird.

Nightingale's number one!

Neanderthals and us, the true story

Neanderthals and us, the true story

Posted Fri, 02 May 2014 11:52:00 GMT by JW Dowey

They came first, but they are still around, having disappeared and now reappeared in our genes and dreams!

Neanderthals and us, the true story

How sloths breathe upside down

How sloths breathe upside down

Posted Wed, 23 Apr 2014 06:34:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The 3-fingered or 3-toed sloth can finally breathe a sloth sigh of relief. We've finally found out how it manages to breathe upside down. To be honest, we’d never thought there was a problem, but there is.

How sloths breathe upside down

Jellies delicious for this fish

Jellies delicious for this fish

Posted Mon, 14 Apr 2014 06:45:00 GMT by JW Dowey

This little sea-bream is able to conveniently dispose of and control jellyfish populations, just as the big turtles can. The research involved has a lot of relevance to turtle conservation as well as the massive jellyfish blooms reported in Japan and other parts of the world.

Jellies delicious for this fish

Leatherback logging in the Atlantic

Leatherback logging in the Atlantic

Posted Thu, 27 Mar 2014 10:10:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The study of marine turtles is linked with tagging of many other animals, but if we lose these leatherback giants of the seas, we will have lost a species that can relay how conditions millions of years ago influenced even bigger turtles and of course every other species that existed at the time.

Leatherback logging in the Atlantic

Swimming sloths with aquatic adaptations

Swimming sloths with aquatic adaptations

Posted Wed, 12 Mar 2014 07:17:00 GMT by JW Dowey

One group of sloths made the quite unlikely shift to water, possibly because of a drying environment in the Miocene. This clever paper shows how they coped with a marine life, just like early whales, by adapting their bone compactness. Our pygmy sloths on the Panamanian island of Isla Escudo de Veraguas are the most recent speciation, around 9,000 years ago. These guys were several species on a sea trip!

Swimming sloths with aquatic adaptations

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Primates and alcohol, a natural relationship?

Posted Wed, 20 Jul 2016 10:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Koomal - predictions for survival in the Australian bush.

Posted Tue, 12 Jul 2016 14:30:01 GMT by Paul Robinson

Sea birds secret colony location policy!

Posted Mon, 16 May 2016 08:59:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

The Potential and Evolutionary Fireworks of Cross-Kingdom Genetic Transfers.

Posted Sat, 16 Apr 2016 11:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

People and Deer: the diverse, diverting past.

Posted Wed, 06 Apr 2016 14:45:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The earliest permafrost pets.

Posted Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:15:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A new population model for right whale numbers in New Zealand.

Posted Wed, 16 Mar 2016 14:35:00 GMT by JW. Dowey

Acidification of the Barrier Reef.

Posted Mon, 07 Mar 2016 07:30:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Air travel with less carbon, more aerodynamics?

Posted Tue, 01 Mar 2016 12:37:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Whale-guided research reveals the oceans’ true biology.

Posted Thu, 18 Feb 2016 11:42:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Radar results from Japan disaster offer hope for tsunami warning system

Posted Wed, 17 Aug 2011 18:56:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

The ultimate rainforest tree thrived in Sundaland.

Posted Sat, 15 Nov 2014 18:54:46 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Copulation was invented by ancient fish

Posted Mon, 20 Oct 2014 14:20:43 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Sail Transport Network - The Past Meets the Future

Posted Fri, 10 Jun 2011 15:43:00 GMT by Julian Jackson

'Pompeii' like fossils of Trilobites found in real-life situations

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 16:01:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

The Planet of the Insects

Posted Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:15:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Placentals ruled before the Cretaceous

Posted Thu, 24 May 2012 12:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

How do we face up to ice loss?

Posted Sat, 21 Mar 2015 10:31:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Newly discovered mature galaxy cluster, revised big bang theory?

Posted Thu, 10 Mar 2011 08:01:00 GMT by Tamara Croes

Masculin-feminin!

Posted Tue, 02 Oct 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong