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KATWARN project: Preparing for the unexpected

KATWARN project: Preparing for the unexpected

Posted Wed, 16 Mar 2011 18:32:00 GMT by Michael Evans

A German project to provide an early warning system for unexpected emergencies. The KATWARN project, from the original German for Catastrophe Warning for Every Eventuality. KATWARN employs various warning channels to reach people affected by disasters. They use classical warning channels like email, text messages and fax. In addition new technologies for important future warning infrastructures are being tested within the project.

KATWARN project: Preparing for the unexpected

British soldiers to go solar powered

British soldiers to go solar powered

Posted Mon, 14 Mar 2011 19:12:00 GMT by Nikki Bruce

A new project is underway to provide soldiers with energy efficient power packs. It has been announced that scientists from the Universities of Glasgow, Loughborough, Strathclyde, Leeds, Reading and Brunel in conjunction with the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) are currently developing a new personal power pack for British troops. Filed in environmental issues: Solar/Science & Technology.

British soldiers to go solar powered

Don't bin that banana skin! It's a water purifier

Don't bin that banana skin! It's a water purifier

Posted Thu, 10 Mar 2011 15:07:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Banana skins can serve as more than just fodder for the compost heap, and for purveyors of slapstick humor. A new study into their effectiveness at filtering heavy metals shows minced banana peel to be one of the best materials to use, to remove these harmful toxins from drinking water. Filed in environmental issues: water purification - science

Don't bin that banana skin! It's a water purifier

Georgia Tech develop early warning system for tsunamis

Georgia Tech develop early warning system for tsunamis

Posted Thu, 10 Mar 2011 08:09:00 GMT by Michael Evans

A system developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology is able to give coastal residents a 20 to 30 minute warning of a tsunami. It is caused by a wave from an under-sea earthquake, spreading outwards until it reaches land, usually without warning. As the depth of water decreases the wave's pent-up energy creates a devastating wall of water that hits the coastal area, causing massive destruction and often a considerable loss of life. Filed under environmental issues: Tsunamis/Technology.

Georgia Tech develop early warning system for tsunamis

Newly discovered mature galaxy cluster, revised big bang theory?

Newly discovered mature galaxy cluster, revised big bang theory?

Posted Thu, 10 Mar 2011 08:01:00 GMT by Tamara Croes

A recently discovered mature cluster of galaxies seems to be a rare phenomenon - or could the universe have developed differently from what is currently thought? Scientists working from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile have recently discovered the furthest mature cluster of galaxies away from us which we can still see. Filed under: Science - Technology.

Newly discovered mature galaxy cluster, revised big bang theory?

Can the leopard change its spots?

Can the leopard change its spots?

Posted Mon, 07 Mar 2011 16:11:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Research at Harvard University has identified the gene that governs colour patterns in mice. Two of the great wonders of Nature are its diversity and its mystery. Why, for instance, do leopards have spots and why do zebras have stripes? Scientists at Harvard University have come a little closer to answering this age-old question.

Can the leopard change its spots?

Pity the poor worm; struggle for Phylum Annelida survival more complex than previously thought

Pity the poor worm; struggle for Phylum Annelida survival more complex than previously thought

Posted Mon, 07 Mar 2011 14:04:00 GMT by Nicolette Smith

The immune system of the Nematode worm and how it can help us to manage dangerous infections. Not many people would confess to an admiration for the worm species, and yet a recent study backed by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) has shown that worms are the ultimate gamblers; a type of worm known as a Nematode plays a high-risk game…with disease resistance.

Pity the poor worm; struggle for Phylum Annelida survival more complex than previously thought

Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Could Halve Amount of Water Plant's Release Into the Atmosphere

Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Could Halve Amount of Water Plant's Release Into the Atmosphere

Posted Sun, 06 Mar 2011 13:16:01 GMT by Nikki Bruce

A new report predicts worrying effects on the transpiration of plants. Enjoy basking in the cool shade of an old oak tree in the height of summer? Well, according to American and Dutch scientists it could soon be a less effective way of escaping the heat from the sun. A new study has found that as a result of rising carbon dioxide levels, plants are releasing less water into the atmosphere.

Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Could Halve Amount of Water Plant's Release Into the Atmosphere

Essential oils from peppermint boosted with a splash of sage, rosemary and thyme

Essential oils from peppermint boosted with a splash of sage, rosemary and thyme

Posted Sun, 06 Mar 2011 10:59:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Spraying peppermint with waste-waters from distilling aromatic herbs boosts their essential oil content, according to Mississippi State University researchers. Rather than just discharging waters left over from the processing of herbs, such as sage, rosemary and thyme, it is hoped they can now be used to give their herbal cousins a helping hand.

Essential oils from peppermint boosted with a splash of sage, rosemary and thyme

Solar flare cycle driven by rivers of plasma

Solar flare cycle driven by rivers of plasma

Posted Thu, 03 Mar 2011 15:34:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

New models of the huge streams of plasma on the surface of the Sun are raising understanding of the complex mechanisms at play. As the solar sunspot cycle picks up speed, and starts sending out new flares towards the Earth, understanding exactly what makes the Sun tick looks to be increasingly important – for the stability communications and power systems, as well as of the climate.

Solar flare cycle driven by rivers of plasma

Florida, the sunshine state just got 10 million years older

Florida, the sunshine state just got 10 million years older

Posted Thu, 03 Mar 2011 14:21:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Florida, the sunshine stats may not be as youthful as looks suggest. A new analysis of samples collected from water boreholes have pushed back the time, when Florida first emerged from the sea, to 45 million years ago. The study describes a familiar landscape of palm trees and islands, and provides useful information for those looking to keep water flowing for local residents.

Florida, the sunshine state just got 10 million years older

Buildings that repair and heat themselves

Buildings that repair and heat themselves

Posted Thu, 03 Mar 2011 13:03:06 GMT by Martin Leggett

A new approach to getting organic materials into tiny glass beads opens up a number of new possibilities for intelligent cement – that can heal cracks, and regulate temperatures. This exciting development is described in a thesis presented to the University of the Basque Country, and raises the prospect of buildings lasting longer – and requiring less energy to be heated and cooled.

Buildings that repair and heat themselves

Crop diversification may help protect farmers from climate change

Crop diversification may help protect farmers from climate change

Posted Wed, 02 Mar 2011 20:06:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Monocultures might be the most efficient way to grow but they're also great for the nasties that destroy crops a new report finds. Now scientists have come up with a very good reason for farmers to grow a wider diversity and variety of crops to protect themselves from the changes likely to result from climate change.

Crop diversification may help protect farmers from climate change

A warming beer! Scientists look for biofuels in brew waste

A warming beer! Scientists look for biofuels in brew waste

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 15:23:02 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Microbes in brewery waste already saves brewers millions by producing methane and now scientists want to put these miniature workers to work on other useful tasks. Cornell scientists have been working with Anheuser-Busch Inbev, which brews Budweiser, to see if microbes which currently produce methane as they break down brewery waste can be put to other uses.

A warming beer! Scientists look for biofuels in brew waste

Using less fertilizer aids corn for fuel

Using less fertilizer aids corn for fuel

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 15:07:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Producing bioethanol from corn residues offers a potentially new twist on the food versus fuel debate. New research suggests that maximizing cellulose production from such residues requires less fertilizer - which also has environmental benefits. But how will that impact grain yields?

Using less fertilizer aids corn for fuel

Warming world could send plants downhill, not up

Warming world could send plants downhill, not up

Posted Fri, 25 Feb 2011 12:21:01 GMT by Laura Goodall

A hotter climate could make some plants move downhill to seek water, suggests new research that challenges the assumption that plants would move uphill to reach cooler elevations. Scientists at the University of Montana, the University of California, Davis, and the University of Idaho are the first to find a widespread downward shift in Californian mountain plants.

Warming world could send plants downhill, not up

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Weapons important for stag beetle evolution.

Posted Thu, 16 Apr 2015 08:56:28 GMT by JW Dowey

How do we face up to ice loss?

Posted Sat, 21 Mar 2015 10:31:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Britons prove their ancestry is diverse

Posted Thu, 19 Mar 2015 10:11:06 GMT by JW Dowey

Endemic Giant Salamander Threat-from its Neighbour.

Posted Wed, 18 Mar 2015 07:33:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bees = humans, in false memory at least.

Posted Sun, 01 Mar 2015 19:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Dragons increase in species numbers.

Posted Wed, 18 Feb 2015 08:10:06 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Pollution: chemical weapons destroyed in US

Posted Wed, 04 Feb 2015 10:55:21 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Fascinating new squid behaviour in nature

Posted Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Chimpanzee losses and successes.

Posted Thu, 22 Jan 2015 16:46:05 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bats fly high and DNA techniques are classy

Posted Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:51:01 GMT by Paul Robinson

Curiosity gets the better of us

Posted Sun, 30 Sep 2012 13:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Touchdown Confirmed - Mars Landing for NASA's Curiosity Rover

Posted Mon, 06 Aug 2012 07:04:27 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Brucellosis is an ancient disease

Posted Wed, 04 Jan 2012 14:31:00 GMT by James Mathews

Thou old black worm, I spit fire on your ashes!

Posted Thu, 09 May 2013 08:48:44 GMT by Paul Robinson

Health Check for Oetzi the Iceman

Posted Wed, 29 Feb 2012 17:34:07 GMT by Dave Armstrong

3D orientation does it for us and chicks

Posted Fri, 16 Mar 2012 13:00:27 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Aping parrots?

Posted Wed, 08 Aug 2012 12:58:59 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Stilt break records for migration and finding water.

Posted Wed, 15 Oct 2014 07:05:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Molasses proves a match for ozone-depleting chemical

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 16:23:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Breaking the Cosmic Speed Limit

Posted Sun, 25 Sep 2011 20:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong