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Newly discovered mature galaxy cluster, revised big bang theory?

Newly discovered mature galaxy cluster, revised big bang theory?

Posted Thu, 10 Mar 2011 08:01:00 GMT by Tamara Croes

A recently discovered mature cluster of galaxies seems to be a rare phenomenon - or could the universe have developed differently from what is currently thought? Scientists working from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile have recently discovered the furthest mature cluster of galaxies away from us which we can still see. Filed under: Science - Technology.

Newly discovered mature galaxy cluster, revised big bang theory?

Can the leopard change its spots?

Can the leopard change its spots?

Posted Mon, 07 Mar 2011 16:11:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Research at Harvard University has identified the gene that governs colour patterns in mice. Two of the great wonders of Nature are its diversity and its mystery. Why, for instance, do leopards have spots and why do zebras have stripes? Scientists at Harvard University have come a little closer to answering this age-old question.

Can the leopard change its spots?

Pity the poor worm; struggle for Phylum Annelida survival more complex than previously thought

Pity the poor worm; struggle for Phylum Annelida survival more complex than previously thought

Posted Mon, 07 Mar 2011 14:04:00 GMT by Nicolette Smith

The immune system of the Nematode worm and how it can help us to manage dangerous infections. Not many people would confess to an admiration for the worm species, and yet a recent study backed by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) has shown that worms are the ultimate gamblers; a type of worm known as a Nematode plays a high-risk game…with disease resistance.

Pity the poor worm; struggle for Phylum Annelida survival more complex than previously thought

Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Could Halve Amount of Water Plant's Release Into the Atmosphere

Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Could Halve Amount of Water Plant's Release Into the Atmosphere

Posted Sun, 06 Mar 2011 13:16:01 GMT by Nikki Bruce

A new report predicts worrying effects on the transpiration of plants. Enjoy basking in the cool shade of an old oak tree in the height of summer? Well, according to American and Dutch scientists it could soon be a less effective way of escaping the heat from the sun. A new study has found that as a result of rising carbon dioxide levels, plants are releasing less water into the atmosphere.

Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Could Halve Amount of Water Plant's Release Into the Atmosphere

Essential oils from peppermint boosted with a splash of sage, rosemary and thyme

Essential oils from peppermint boosted with a splash of sage, rosemary and thyme

Posted Sun, 06 Mar 2011 10:59:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Spraying peppermint with waste-waters from distilling aromatic herbs boosts their essential oil content, according to Mississippi State University researchers. Rather than just discharging waters left over from the processing of herbs, such as sage, rosemary and thyme, it is hoped they can now be used to give their herbal cousins a helping hand.

Essential oils from peppermint boosted with a splash of sage, rosemary and thyme

Solar flare cycle driven by rivers of plasma

Solar flare cycle driven by rivers of plasma

Posted Thu, 03 Mar 2011 15:34:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

New models of the huge streams of plasma on the surface of the Sun are raising understanding of the complex mechanisms at play. As the solar sunspot cycle picks up speed, and starts sending out new flares towards the Earth, understanding exactly what makes the Sun tick looks to be increasingly important – for the stability communications and power systems, as well as of the climate.

Solar flare cycle driven by rivers of plasma

Florida, the sunshine state just got 10 million years older

Florida, the sunshine state just got 10 million years older

Posted Thu, 03 Mar 2011 14:21:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Florida, the sunshine stats may not be as youthful as looks suggest. A new analysis of samples collected from water boreholes have pushed back the time, when Florida first emerged from the sea, to 45 million years ago. The study describes a familiar landscape of palm trees and islands, and provides useful information for those looking to keep water flowing for local residents.

Florida, the sunshine state just got 10 million years older

Buildings that repair and heat themselves

Buildings that repair and heat themselves

Posted Thu, 03 Mar 2011 13:03:06 GMT by Martin Leggett

A new approach to getting organic materials into tiny glass beads opens up a number of new possibilities for intelligent cement – that can heal cracks, and regulate temperatures. This exciting development is described in a thesis presented to the University of the Basque Country, and raises the prospect of buildings lasting longer – and requiring less energy to be heated and cooled.

Buildings that repair and heat themselves

Crop diversification may help protect farmers from climate change

Crop diversification may help protect farmers from climate change

Posted Wed, 02 Mar 2011 20:06:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Monocultures might be the most efficient way to grow but they're also great for the nasties that destroy crops a new report finds. Now scientists have come up with a very good reason for farmers to grow a wider diversity and variety of crops to protect themselves from the changes likely to result from climate change.

Crop diversification may help protect farmers from climate change

A warming beer! Scientists look for biofuels in brew waste

A warming beer! Scientists look for biofuels in brew waste

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 15:23:02 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Microbes in brewery waste already saves brewers millions by producing methane and now scientists want to put these miniature workers to work on other useful tasks. Cornell scientists have been working with Anheuser-Busch Inbev, which brews Budweiser, to see if microbes which currently produce methane as they break down brewery waste can be put to other uses.

A warming beer! Scientists look for biofuels in brew waste

Using less fertilizer aids corn for fuel

Using less fertilizer aids corn for fuel

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 15:07:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Producing bioethanol from corn residues offers a potentially new twist on the food versus fuel debate. New research suggests that maximizing cellulose production from such residues requires less fertilizer - which also has environmental benefits. But how will that impact grain yields?

Using less fertilizer aids corn for fuel

Warming world could send plants downhill, not up

Warming world could send plants downhill, not up

Posted Fri, 25 Feb 2011 12:21:01 GMT by Laura Goodall

A hotter climate could make some plants move downhill to seek water, suggests new research that challenges the assumption that plants would move uphill to reach cooler elevations. Scientists at the University of Montana, the University of California, Davis, and the University of Idaho are the first to find a widespread downward shift in Californian mountain plants.

Warming world could send plants downhill, not up

Will Facebook Go Green by Earth Day?

Will Facebook Go Green by Earth Day?

Posted Fri, 25 Feb 2011 08:29:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

Greenpeace is putting pressure on Facebook to become a world leader in clean energy by this year's Earth Day. Earth Day is a global celebration of the Earth's natural environment and is a chance to promote and inspire awareness to taking better care of our precious resources.

Will Facebook Go Green by Earth Day?

Scavenger T.rex much more like a hyena than a lion

Scavenger T.rex much more like a hyena than a lion

Posted Wed, 23 Feb 2011 17:02:00 GMT by Louise Murray

An epic Montana fossil bed census suggests Tyrannosaurus rex was more of an opportunistic scavenger like a hyena, than an apex predator like a lion. This is the largest study of its kind in the world and the first complete picture of an ancient ecosystem dominated by dinosaurs.

Scavenger T.rex much more like a hyena than a lion

'Thunderthighs' - a new species of dinosaur discovered

'Thunderthighs' - a new species of dinosaur discovered

Posted Wed, 23 Feb 2011 12:22:00 GMT by Louise Murray

A new species of dinosaur, Brontomerus, literally 'thunderthighs', has been found in a quarry in Utah, USA. Named for it's extremely large thigh muscles, the larger than elephant-sized beast may have used them to kick fight predators or rivals.

'Thunderthighs' - a new species of dinosaur discovered

Biodiesel produced from wastewater microalgae

Biodiesel produced from wastewater microalgae

Posted Sun, 20 Feb 2011 10:04:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

Scientists have developed a way to extract a new kind of biodiesel from microalgae. They have worked out that once the microalgae have been through the treatment system and purified the wastewater then it can potentially be used to run construction vehicles, buses and farm equipment.

Biodiesel produced from wastewater microalgae

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Bees = humans, in false memory at least.

Posted Sun, 01 Mar 2015 19:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Dragons increase in species numbers.

Posted Wed, 18 Feb 2015 08:10:06 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Pollution: chemical weapons destroyed in US

Posted Wed, 04 Feb 2015 10:55:21 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Fascinating new squid behaviour in nature

Posted Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Chimpanzee losses and successes.

Posted Thu, 22 Jan 2015 16:46:05 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bats fly high and DNA techniques are classy

Posted Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:51:01 GMT by Paul Robinson

Pluto approached by "strange" probe

Posted Tue, 06 Jan 2015 11:17:02 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Astronomers rule (in their universe)

Posted Thu, 01 Jan 2015 10:15:11 GMT by JW Dowey

Mammals that cannot see in the light

Posted Sat, 27 Dec 2014 11:02:11 GMT by JW Dowey

A giant leap for frog-kind.

Posted Fri, 19 Dec 2014 09:34:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Social Mobsters in the Kalahari

Posted Thu, 04 Jul 2013 12:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Ancient hominid goes from from nut-cracker to grass-grazer

Posted Tue, 03 May 2011 14:06:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Supply questions asked as rare earths are getting rarer

Posted Mon, 10 Oct 2011 16:18:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Higgs boson-like particle discovery is missing one more link

Posted Wed, 04 Jul 2012 14:32:11 GMT by Dave Armstrong

'Pompeii' like fossils of Trilobites found in real-life situations

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 16:01:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

'Minibeasts' rule the world, it seems

Posted Tue, 18 Oct 2011 22:12:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Did icy-methane bring on the age of the dinosaur?

Posted Thu, 21 Jul 2011 18:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Elephant v. Man

Posted Wed, 14 Dec 2011 09:54:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Flame retardants that fight fire and pollution

Posted Wed, 31 Aug 2011 16:31:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Marmosets are marvelous !

Posted Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:01:00 GMT by Paul Robinson