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Risk it, even if you’re a shy great tit!

Risk it, even if you’re a shy great tit!

Posted Wed, 14 May 2014 09:59:01 GMT by Paul Robinson

Personality in great tits stretches as far as deciding whether to risk your life for your eggs. Would you go back home if somebody seems to threaten your cosy little nest in some unknown way? Insights into survival, evolution of boldness, domesticity and even our own reactions to stress can be found here!

Risk it, even if you’re a shy great tit!

Nightingale's number one!

Nightingale's number one!

Posted Mon, 05 May 2014 09:46:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

We love the muse of Beethoven, Shakespeare and Keats. But as we tend to lose their habitat, many will never have the chance to hear what has now been verified as the richest song in the bird world. Long live the little brown bird.

Nightingale's number one!

Neanderthals and us, the true story

Neanderthals and us, the true story

Posted Fri, 02 May 2014 11:52:00 GMT by JW Dowey

They came first, but they are still around, having disappeared and now reappeared in our genes and dreams!

Neanderthals and us, the true story

How sloths breathe upside down

How sloths breathe upside down

Posted Wed, 23 Apr 2014 06:34:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The 3-fingered or 3-toed sloth can finally breathe a sloth sigh of relief. We've finally found out how it manages to breathe upside down. To be honest, we’d never thought there was a problem, but there is.

How sloths breathe upside down

Jellies delicious for this fish

Jellies delicious for this fish

Posted Mon, 14 Apr 2014 06:45:00 GMT by JW Dowey

This little sea-bream is able to conveniently dispose of and control jellyfish populations, just as the big turtles can. The research involved has a lot of relevance to turtle conservation as well as the massive jellyfish blooms reported in Japan and other parts of the world.

Jellies delicious for this fish

Leatherback logging in the Atlantic

Leatherback logging in the Atlantic

Posted Thu, 27 Mar 2014 10:10:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The study of marine turtles is linked with tagging of many other animals, but if we lose these leatherback giants of the seas, we will have lost a species that can relay how conditions millions of years ago influenced even bigger turtles and of course every other species that existed at the time.

Leatherback logging in the Atlantic

Swimming sloths with aquatic adaptations

Swimming sloths with aquatic adaptations

Posted Wed, 12 Mar 2014 07:17:00 GMT by JW Dowey

One group of sloths made the quite unlikely shift to water, possibly because of a drying environment in the Miocene. This clever paper shows how they coped with a marine life, just like early whales, by adapting their bone compactness. Our pygmy sloths on the Panamanian island of Isla Escudo de Veraguas are the most recent speciation, around 9,000 years ago. These guys were several species on a sea trip!

Swimming sloths with aquatic adaptations

Fantastic ancient fauna precedes mammal evolution

Fantastic ancient fauna precedes mammal evolution

Posted Wed, 05 Mar 2014 16:50:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Animals of unfamiliar as well as familiar types took up niches in the ancient ecosystems, as birds and mammals developed and, of course, feathered dinosaurs ruled the roost!

Fantastic ancient fauna precedes mammal evolution

Skin cancer selected our ancestors?

Skin cancer selected our ancestors?

Posted Wed, 26 Feb 2014 07:40:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

We can't find the fossils and the genome can give only some hints. How did the first human-like species survive and why did they have to be black. Mel Greaves has the answers.

Skin cancer selected our ancestors?

The right whale, by satellite

The right whale, by satellite

Posted Sun, 16 Feb 2014 16:43:00 GMT by JW Dowey

When you want to count how many rare animals are out there, remote cameras have come into their own. Now even the spy in the sky can help, with the first study of a whale species that has been having high mortality problems with its calves.

The right whale, by satellite

Hawaiian rise in endangered species

Hawaiian rise in endangered species

Posted Tue, 04 Feb 2014 15:11:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

We need technology to discover where and how endangered species survive. The US government have just declared 15 more Hawaiian species as endangered, but the islands have so many, it is difficult to see how they can all be conserved.

Hawaiian rise in endangered species

Flores Human Dwarf Debate

Flores Human Dwarf Debate

Posted Sun, 02 Feb 2014 17:01:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The feet of the Flores hominid might be more conclusive than the small head, if we ever come to better conclusions about its ecology, niche or even what it ate. The point is, we can’t even decide on its species and it's only 18,000 years old.

Flores Human Dwarf Debate

Flying and genome size: it’s true about the reduction!

Flying and genome size: it’s true about the reduction!

Posted Tue, 28 Jan 2014 20:03:42 GMT by Colin Ricketts

From humming birds to eagles, the birds have diversified their niches worldwide. Their genome however is reduced compared to us earthbound creatures!

Flying and genome size: it’s true about the reduction!

Australian outback dingoed or natural ecosystem?

Australian outback dingoed or natural ecosystem?

Posted Thu, 16 Jan 2014 12:16:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

When they rage at the dingo, the ignorant fail to appreciate what many of us have thought. The need for such predation and scavenging is always present, plus we all need more natural systems than the awesome monoculture we get from tropical oil palms to “recyclable” spruce plantations.

Australian outback dingoed or natural ecosystem?

How fish evolved their migratory habits

How fish evolved their migratory habits

Posted Wed, 15 Jan 2014 00:01:00 GMT by JW Dowey

You would expect an evolutionary shift to be a trend, but in one great family of fish, there is little evidence that lightning strikes twice, especially in the same freshwater ecosystem!

How fish evolved their migratory habits

Bird speciations made clear

Bird speciations made clear

Posted Wed, 01 Jan 2014 15:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We can catalogue all the live and some extinct species on earth. The sooner we know all those insects and marine creatures, the quicker we can deal with conservation management in the most efficient ways possible.

Bird speciations made clear

Scitech News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

Copulation was invented by ancient fish.

Posted Mon, 20 Oct 2014 14:20:43 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Stilt break records for migration and finding water.

Posted Wed, 15 Oct 2014 07:05:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Geckos crossed the line and got bigger

Posted Tue, 07 Oct 2014 23:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

As much oxygen as you need

Posted Fri, 03 Oct 2014 17:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Springtails and harvestmen, a new predator/prey story

Posted Thu, 02 Oct 2014 08:47:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Birds and passion, Ecuador rules in biodiversity

Posted Wed, 01 Oct 2014 09:15:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Vainglorious peacock or successful breeder?

Posted Thu, 18 Sep 2014 14:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

'Spiny' is the Super-Sized Predatory Dino

Posted Sat, 13 Sep 2014 13:28:28 GMT by JW Dowey

Ice melt increases at both Poles

Posted Sat, 06 Sep 2014 09:22:16 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The Planet of the Insects

Posted Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:15:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

New Wireless Platform for Electric Scooters Launched

Posted Wed, 09 Nov 2011 19:51:00 GMT by James Mathews

Caught between Snowball Earths - the first shelly amoebas

Posted Thu, 16 Jun 2011 16:52:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Leatherback logging in the Atlantic

Posted Thu, 27 Mar 2014 10:10:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Robo-fish uses arti-fish-ial intelligence to find pollution

Posted Tue, 22 May 2012 13:27:20 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Niches and speciation in orca

Posted Wed, 14 Aug 2013 09:26:48 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Global warming and mammal body size

Posted Sat, 25 Feb 2012 07:54:12 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Sex determination in birds

Posted Tue, 29 May 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Semiconductor uses solar power to take H2 from water

Posted Wed, 11 May 2011 17:22:00 GMT by Gracie Valena

More power from spinach

Posted Tue, 04 Sep 2012 18:03:37 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Minoans and genes

Posted Thu, 16 May 2013 13:04:15 GMT by JW Dowey