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Hear No Problems and See the Solutions

Hear No Problems and See the Solutions

Posted Tue, 12 Apr 2011 15:11:00 GMT by Tara Lynne Groth

What if you could change the color and tint of your windows and re-circulate the solar energy as electricity? Utilizing natural light by installing more windows allows you to rely less on artificial light sources; however the extra window space can negatively influence interior climate control and stress HVAC systems. A new technology in the glass manufacturing industry allows windows to collect solar energy and be reused. The color and tint of the windows can be controlled as well.

Hear No Problems and See the Solutions

Massive ocean studies raise grim possibilities for European climate

Massive ocean studies raise grim possibilities for European climate

Posted Thu, 07 Apr 2011 18:02:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Major studies of the oceans around Europe have led scientists to warn of possible changes in temperatures and sea conditions which will have a major impact on human and marine life. Scientists have raised alarming prospects for the future of the climate of north western Europe as meltwater pours south from the Arctic possibly slowing the warming ocean currents.

Massive ocean studies raise grim possibilities for European climate

Earth started out as 'candy floss'

Earth started out as 'candy floss'

Posted Mon, 28 Mar 2011 11:51:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

When the Earth was being built, the materials first to hand were fragile candy floss-like matter, says a new study in Nature Geoscience. The research also confirms that it was the chaos of the early solar nebula that whipped this matter into the more solid rocks, that formed the planets we have today.

Earth started out as 'candy floss'

New evidence of the first Americans

New evidence of the first Americans

Posted Sat, 26 Mar 2011 17:18:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

A new archaeological find in Texas pushes further back the date when humans arrived in American, spelling the end of the Clovis First theory. The evidence has been found in Texas, where thousands of artefacts were discovered beneath a previous find of Clovis relics. Archaeologists believe the new evidence is between 13,200 and 15,500 years old and shows signs that the Clovis people adapted and improved on previous technologies.

New evidence of the first Americans

''Feathered Helmet'' opens door on earliest vertebrates

''Feathered Helmet'' opens door on earliest vertebrates

Posted Sat, 26 Mar 2011 16:33:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

A new fossil find in China shows in unprecedented detail an ancient sea creature which scientists hope will help them find how the earliest vertebrates evolved. Researchers from China, Leicester and Oxford found the fossil, which for the first time shows the soft tentacles of primitive creatures called pterobranch hemichordates, which sheds new light on an important group of primitive sea creatures.

''Feathered Helmet'' opens door on earliest vertebrates

SuperHomes are Open to Visitors

SuperHomes are Open to Visitors

Posted Fri, 25 Mar 2011 12:21:00 GMT by Julian Jackson

Spring Opening for old houses that have been transformed into super low emissions properties. What is a SuperHome and does it wear a cape?  The answer to that is fairly clear: no it doesn't; in fact a SuperHome looks pretty much like an ordinary home, except it may have solar panels on the roof. It is inside that it is different. SuperHomes are homes that have reduced their their carbon emissions by at least 60%.

SuperHomes are Open to Visitors

Skinny worms provide new approach for obesity drugs

Skinny worms provide new approach for obesity drugs

Posted Thu, 24 Mar 2011 14:31:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Chemicals tested on worms may be of use in human medicines say a team of American researchers, and it's a major breakthrogh in designing new drugs. Scientists at the University of California, San Francisco have found a new way to understand human obesity in the unlikeliest of animals - the traditionally long and thin worm.

Skinny worms provide new approach for obesity drugs

Neutron probe reveals bacteria's light-gathering secrets

Neutron probe reveals bacteria's light-gathering secrets

Posted Thu, 24 Mar 2011 11:50:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

The power of neutrons have been bought to bear on the delicate structures of light-gathering bacteria, in new research published in the latest issue of biophysical Langmuir. It shows that chlorosomes in the bacteria are stable under conditions that could be employed in biohybrid solar cells - so opening the door to more efficient solar power, inspired by nature.

Neutron probe reveals bacteria's light-gathering secrets

Technology sees the way to tackle lameness in horses, the Lameness Locator

Technology sees the way to tackle lameness in horses, the Lameness Locator

Posted Wed, 23 Mar 2011 07:41:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Lameness is the bain of the equine world and very hard to spot. Now, scientists are using the latest motion sensors to do a better job than the human eye. Horse lovers, horse owners even horse racing followers the world over would love University of Missouri equine veterinarian Kevin Keegan's new ''Lameness Locator'' - a novel way of diagnosing the most common equine ailment of all - to be a roaring success

Technology sees the way to tackle lameness in horses, the Lameness Locator

Biofuel boost from modified microbes

Biofuel boost from modified microbes

Posted Fri, 18 Mar 2011 09:07:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

A bit of genetic tweaking has produced a tenfold increase in the amount of biofuels bacteria can produce, pushing the process towards commercially viable levels of output. Bacteria produce the fuel and James C. Liao, UCLA's Chancellor's Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, who led the team managed to produce 15 to 30 grams of n-butanol per litre of culture medium by genetically modifying Escherichia coli (E. coli).

Biofuel boost from modified microbes

Molasses proves a match for ozone-depleting chemical

Molasses proves a match for ozone-depleting chemical

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 16:23:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Using molasses to encourage beneficial microbes could help to replace a chemical which damages the ozone layer. The USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are seeing if a system that uses the treacle to stimulate beneficial bacteria in the soil and so does away with the need for Methyl Bromide.

Molasses proves a match for ozone-depleting chemical

'Pompeii' like fossils of Trilobites found in real-life situations

'Pompeii' like fossils of Trilobites found in real-life situations

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 16:01:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Sudden death and burial by hurricane-displaced sediments has frozen ancient creatures in real-life situations which allow scientists to try and decipher how they behaved. University of Cincinnati palaeontologist Carlton E Brett says colonies of ancient sea creatures have been caught in mid-orgy by sudden downpours of fossilising sediment catching snapshots of life in the way that the eruption of Mount Vesuvius did at Pompeii.

'Pompeii' like fossils of Trilobites found in real-life situations

Bacteria tests offer green fuel hope

Bacteria tests offer green fuel hope

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 15:01:00 GMT by John Dean

Researchers at an American university have devised a way to dramatically increase the production of butanol - an environmentally-friendly alternative to diesel and gasoline - from bacteria normally seen as harmful to humans.

Bacteria tests offer green fuel hope

KATWARN project: Preparing for the unexpected

KATWARN project: Preparing for the unexpected

Posted Wed, 16 Mar 2011 18:32:00 GMT by Michael Evans

A German project to provide an early warning system for unexpected emergencies. The KATWARN project, from the original German for Catastrophe Warning for Every Eventuality. KATWARN employs various warning channels to reach people affected by disasters. They use classical warning channels like email, text messages and fax. In addition new technologies for important future warning infrastructures are being tested within the project.

KATWARN project: Preparing for the unexpected

British soldiers to go solar powered

British soldiers to go solar powered

Posted Mon, 14 Mar 2011 19:12:00 GMT by Nikki Bruce

A new project is underway to provide soldiers with energy efficient power packs. It has been announced that scientists from the Universities of Glasgow, Loughborough, Strathclyde, Leeds, Reading and Brunel in conjunction with the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) are currently developing a new personal power pack for British troops. Filed in environmental issues: Solar/Science & Technology.

British soldiers to go solar powered

Don't bin that banana skin! It's a water purifier

Don't bin that banana skin! It's a water purifier

Posted Thu, 10 Mar 2011 15:07:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Banana skins can serve as more than just fodder for the compost heap, and for purveyors of slapstick humor. A new study into their effectiveness at filtering heavy metals shows minced banana peel to be one of the best materials to use, to remove these harmful toxins from drinking water. Filed in environmental issues: water purification - science

Don't bin that banana skin! It's a water purifier

Scitech News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

Jellies delicious for this fish

Posted Mon, 14 Apr 2014 06:45:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Leatherback logging in the Atlantic

Posted Thu, 27 Mar 2014 10:10:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Swimming sloths with aquatic adaptations

Posted Wed, 12 Mar 2014 07:17:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Fantastic ancient fauna precedes mammal evolution

Posted Wed, 05 Mar 2014 16:50:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Skin cancer selected our ancestors?

Posted Wed, 26 Feb 2014 07:40:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

The right whale, by satellite

Posted Sun, 16 Feb 2014 16:43:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Hawaiian rise in endangered species

Posted Tue, 04 Feb 2014 15:11:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Flores Human Dwarf Debate

Posted Sun, 02 Feb 2014 17:01:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Flying and genome size: it’s true about the reduction!

Posted Tue, 28 Jan 2014 20:03:42 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Australian outback dingoed or natural ecosystem?

Posted Thu, 16 Jan 2014 12:16:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Green light for jumping spiders

Posted Sat, 28 Jan 2012 10:01:57 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Quasar disc seen around black hole

Posted Fri, 04 Nov 2011 20:40:01 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Biofuel boost from modified microbes

Posted Fri, 18 Mar 2011 09:07:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

New 'bio-Styrofoam' seems 'pretty green'

Posted Tue, 23 Nov 2010 18:22:19 GMT by Rachel England

Will a little piece of the Red planet go green in 2030?

Posted Sun, 28 Aug 2011 20:22:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

The role of marine plankton in sequestration of carbon

Posted Wed, 22 Jun 2011 17:07:00 GMT by Mike Campbell

'Thunderthighs' - a new species of dinosaur discovered

Posted Wed, 23 Feb 2011 12:22:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Leaping Lizards and Self-righting Robots

Posted Thu, 05 Jan 2012 16:22:00 GMT by Dave Collier

Murder by the cannibal neighbours

Posted Sun, 24 Nov 2013 20:30:02 GMT by JW Dowey

Lounging lizards and snake bytes

Posted Wed, 19 Sep 2012 13:18:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong