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Best habitats for life on Mars were underground, new study suggests

Best habitats for life on Mars were underground, new study suggests

Posted Thu, 03 Nov 2011 14:14:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Data from mineral clay sites on Mars suggests that the most stable habitats for life appear to have been in the subsurface, where warm water existed for long durations.

Best habitats for life on Mars were underground, new study suggests

Bacterial enzyme one billion years old

Bacterial enzyme one billion years old

Posted Wed, 02 Nov 2011 17:50:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The University of Waikato, near Hamilton, has computed accurate predictions about the size, shape, composition and the amazing speed of ancient bacterial enzymes.

Bacterial enzyme one billion years old

Engineering students grow smarter thanks to FarmVille

Engineering students grow smarter thanks to FarmVille

Posted Tue, 01 Nov 2011 20:50:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

American undergraduates use Facebook's FarmVille game to learn lessons about business and engineering. The 28 students at Missouri University of Science and Technology played Facebook's popular FarmVille game to learn how to help improve their decision-making in both engineering and in the commercial world.

Engineering students grow smarter thanks to FarmVille

Those pesky bacteria

Those pesky bacteria

Posted Mon, 31 Oct 2011 19:39:00 GMT by Ines Morales

New research on marine life and ship maintenance. If you have ever gone for a walk on the intertidal zone at low tide, you have surely noticed how slimy the rocks are. All sorts of little things grow on them, from seaweed and barnacles to even more diminutive critters like algae and bacteria.

Those pesky bacteria

Asteroids the size of a small house and aircraft carrier passing the Earth

Asteroids the size of a small house and aircraft carrier passing the Earth

Posted Mon, 31 Oct 2011 15:02:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

An asteroid the size of a house is passing by on Monday evening (31st October). 2011MD's very nature - probably carbon or an iron/nickel mixture-is fairly obvious, similar to another visitor in February. Asteroid 2005 YU55 passes Earth next Tuesday, November 8th and is the size of an aircraft carrier.

Asteroids the size of a small house and aircraft carrier passing the Earth

Ice Warms in Antarctica

Ice Warms in Antarctica

Posted Fri, 28 Oct 2011 15:44:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The wild west of Antarctica has many thinning glaciers such as the huge Getz Ice Shelf, the Pine Island Glacier, and the Thwaites Glacier. NASA's Ice Bridge Project is now in full production there, showing how this strategic locked-up water is liable to be released quicker than we thought, causing higher sea levels worldwide.

Ice Warms in Antarctica

We don't need no trees

We don't need no trees

Posted Fri, 28 Oct 2011 13:33:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Trees could be redundant as far as carbon debts are concerned. Together with his artificial tree, Professor Klaus Lackner has been working on carbon absorption for many years. After trying artificial carbonates and storing liquid CO2, he has brought his latest ideas to the Institution of Mechanical Engineers' Air Capture Week in London.

We don't need no trees

Mystery Object and Three New Planets Found

Mystery Object and Three New Planets Found

Posted Fri, 28 Oct 2011 12:21:00 GMT by James Mathews

A discovery of three new planets and a mystery object orbiting with them has been discovered. A international research team have discovered a group of three new planets that are all in orbit around their own dying giant stars. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope was used by the team that is led by an astronomer from Penn state University; they have named the three planets HD 240237, BD +48 738 and HD 96127.

Mystery Object and Three New Planets Found

Supernova RCW 86 Mystery Solved with Spitzer and WISE

Supernova RCW 86 Mystery Solved with Spitzer and WISE

Posted Wed, 26 Oct 2011 00:37:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

In AD185, a guest star amused the Chinese astronomers of the time for an eight month spell. One of several supernovae that the advanced civilisation peered at over their history had illuminated their erudite books with heavenly light. In fact, we have known for a while it was RCW 86, but now we have an idea about how far the explosion spread and how a white dwarf was involved.

Supernova RCW 86 Mystery Solved with Spitzer and WISE

Thermo-learning from Nest Labs

Thermo-learning from Nest Labs

Posted Tue, 25 Oct 2011 22:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Nest Laboratories at Palo Alto have furthered the Californian ambition to be ahead in all technology. As far as your home comforts are concerned, the learning thermostat has the potential to keep you at your most comfortable when you're there and preserve your bank balance when you're not.

Thermo-learning from Nest Labs

Americans hunted Mastodon

Americans hunted Mastodon

Posted Fri, 21 Oct 2011 17:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

North Americans will be pleased to find that their history has been backdated by 800 years. Texas A&M University researched in Washington State with the help of universities from Colorado, Washington and, of course, Denmark. The research is published in the journal, Science. A mastodon is the original star of the show, found in a pond at the Manis site on the Olympic peninsula.

Americans hunted Mastodon

Low Flying Objects

Low Flying Objects

Posted Fri, 21 Oct 2011 11:04:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

DASH, short for Dynamic Autonomous Sprawled Hexapod was a robot investigating stability. Designing a 25 g, 10 cm robot was easy, but they couldn't decide whether it should be a bird or an insect. There was a clue though - it had six legs.

Low Flying Objects

Glass is half full for nano disease diagnosis

Glass is half full for nano disease diagnosis

Posted Thu, 20 Oct 2011 15:43:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Nanotechnology is a potentially exciting future medical tool but it remains prohibitively expensive. An MIT scientist sought inspiration in glass blowing to find a way to mass produce these super tiny diagnostic tools.

Glass is half full for nano disease diagnosis

New star clusters unveiled by ESO telescope

New star clusters unveiled by ESO telescope

Posted Thu, 20 Oct 2011 15:07:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Astronomers from the European Southern Observatory in Chile have announced the discovery of two new rare globular clusters of stars in the heart of our Milky Way galaxy. The discoveries represent the fruits of an ambitious project to survey the center of the galaxy in infrared light.

New star clusters unveiled by ESO telescope

Mystery of dark matter deepens

Mystery of dark matter deepens

Posted Wed, 19 Oct 2011 07:34:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

A new study shows that mysterious dark matter is even more mysterious than cosmologists thought. Now scientists will need to come up with new theories regarding the nature of the strange stuff that astrophysicists believe makes up the bulk of the universe.

Mystery of dark matter deepens

'Minibeasts' rule the world, it seems

'Minibeasts' rule the world, it seems

Posted Tue, 18 Oct 2011 22:12:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We look down on it. We trample all over it. We very rarely give it a thought, but, ''most of Earth's biodiversity is found in soil,'' NSF program director Matt Kane states! The NSF (National Science Foundation) in the US are aided and abetted in this study by Colorado State University, riding to the rescue of the unloved soil denizens.

'Minibeasts' rule the world, it seems

Scitech News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

Otters and their social learning abilities.

Posted Wed, 30 Aug 2017 09:45:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Our vertebrate relatives have evolved plenty of Jaw

Posted Mon, 31 Jul 2017 08:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Salamander polyploid amazes with its genome (s)

Posted Fri, 23 Jun 2017 10:56:47 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The Tempo of Evolution is revealed on Hawaii

Posted Mon, 20 Mar 2017 09:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Blue whales' calls give ID of new populations

Posted Wed, 04 Jan 2017 10:36:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Crow wing shape and its association with species distribution.

Posted Wed, 14 Dec 2016 09:10:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The Force is with the Claw of Land Crabs

Posted Thu, 24 Nov 2016 14:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Sailfish hunt, but is cooperation evolving?

Posted Wed, 02 Nov 2016 10:45:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Going to the dogs in Sardinia.

Posted Thu, 13 Oct 2016 13:05:31 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The great migration of the painted lady.

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2016 08:35:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Murder by the cannibal neighbours

Posted Sun, 24 Nov 2013 20:30:02 GMT by JW Dowey

Aviation goes green

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2011 08:04:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Flocking genomes! (bird ancestry resolved!)

Posted Fri, 12 Dec 2014 09:45:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

More power from spinach

Posted Tue, 04 Sep 2012 18:03:37 GMT by Adrian Bishop

O'Sun Nomad portable solar light system

Posted Mon, 16 Jul 2012 07:47:13 GMT by Adrian Bishop

All in the game: online players open up AIDS drug research

Posted Mon, 19 Sep 2011 14:18:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Using wasted power to power our machines

Posted Wed, 01 Jun 2011 18:04:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Plant insect-repellent used in Stone Age

Posted Fri, 09 Dec 2011 18:19:01 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Low Flying Objects

Posted Fri, 21 Oct 2011 11:04:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

KATWARN project: Preparing for the unexpected

Posted Wed, 16 Mar 2011 18:32:00 GMT by Michael Evans