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Big fat galaxy cluster discovered

Big fat galaxy cluster discovered

Posted Wed, 11 Jan 2012 15:16:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

The biggest and hottest galaxy cluster, nicknamed The Fat One, has been found by scientists

Big fat galaxy cluster discovered

Leaping Lizards and Self-righting Robots

Leaping Lizards and Self-righting Robots

Posted Thu, 05 Jan 2012 16:22:00 GMT by Dave Collier

A multidisciplinary team of researchers have investigated how lizards use their tails to improve their ability to jump successfully. The separation between biology and engineering has been ignored in an interdisciplinary research project carried out at UC Berkeley.

Leaping Lizards and Self-righting Robots

An Ichthyosaur and other Tales

An Ichthyosaur and other Tales

Posted Thu, 05 Jan 2012 08:05:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Valentin Fischer of the University of Liege, with several others, including Darren Naisch of the School of Earth Sciences at Southampton University, have illuminated the dark recesses of ichthyosaur biology with the unveiling of a new species.

An Ichthyosaur and other Tales

Brucellosis is an ancient disease

Brucellosis is an ancient disease

Posted Wed, 04 Jan 2012 14:31:00 GMT by James Mathews

In Michigan, two teams of University researchers have just confirmed the existence of brucellosis in some ancient skeletal remains.

Brucellosis is an ancient disease

A brighter, more reliable future with LED lighting

A brighter, more reliable future with LED lighting

Posted Wed, 21 Dec 2011 09:42:33 GMT by Dave Collier

A survey by the Energy Saving Trust has found numerous benefits in the adoption of LED lighting. The light-emitting diode (LED) is not a new invention. First created in 1927, they have slowly become an integral part of our daily lives.

A brighter, more reliable future with LED lighting

'Penguin' mini-sub will explore ocean depths

'Penguin' mini-sub will explore ocean depths

Posted Mon, 19 Dec 2011 18:22:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

A mini-submarine, shaped like a penguin, has been created by a German university team to dive 6,000 metres and locate amazing deep-sea creatures and valuable raw materials.

'Penguin' mini-sub will explore ocean depths

Collecting comet samples

Collecting comet samples

Posted Thu, 15 Dec 2011 02:02:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Around 2014, one of those orbiting comets will come close enough for a real grab at its contents. Hovering above the target comet, sub-surface samples could be precisely taken from even the most forbidding area of the body.

Collecting comet samples

Stratolaunch Systems privately-financed space travel service

Stratolaunch Systems privately-financed space travel service

Posted Thu, 15 Dec 2011 00:27:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

A privately-funded space travel service, involving the world's largest aircraft, is planned to take-off in five years. Stratolaunch Systems, headed by philanthropist and businessman Paul G Allen and aerospace leader Burt Rutan, is the American company behind the air-launch space travel.

Stratolaunch Systems privately-financed space travel service

Elephant v. Man

Elephant v. Man

Posted Wed, 14 Dec 2011 09:54:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The first 'men', Homo erectus, are known to have eaten elephant. Instead of berries and nuts and shellfish from the shore, the steaks must have created a few full stomachs.

Elephant v. Man

Lake sediment is time capsule

Lake sediment is time capsule

Posted Tue, 13 Dec 2011 16:21:02 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Sediment around the great lakes can provide invaluable data about life today and in the past, say experts from the Large Lakes Observatory, in the USA.

Lake sediment is time capsule

 Socially contagious! (Are rats more human than we thought?)

Socially contagious! (Are rats more human than we thought?)

Posted Sat, 10 Dec 2011 22:20:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Rat empathy? The rat, love it or loathe it, has a distinct movie persona, a top reputation for intelligent scavenging, and is a good pet. Researchers have now given it an almost human character.

Socially contagious! (Are rats more human than we thought?)

Possible gypsum deposit may reveal Martian mysteries

Possible gypsum deposit may reveal Martian mysteries

Posted Fri, 09 Dec 2011 19:40:00 GMT by Dave Collier

Data from the Mars rover, Opportunity, shows a possible gypsum deposit that would suggest the presence of water in the past.

Possible gypsum deposit may reveal Martian mysteries

Plant insect-repellent used in Stone Age

Plant insect-repellent used in Stone Age

Posted Fri, 09 Dec 2011 18:19:01 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Leaves from the river wild-quince plant was used 77,000 years ago in South Africa to ward-off mosquitoes, scientists have found.

Plant insect-repellent used in Stone Age

Mammoth cloning possible

Mammoth cloning possible

Posted Mon, 05 Dec 2011 22:44:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Japan and Russia are collaborating at last. It's all on behalf of a mammoth found a few months ago in Batagay in the Sakha Republic (in Siberia). The search for material is a result of the long-standing cooperation between Kinki University and the Mammoth Museum in the city of Yakutsk.

Mammoth cloning possible

Tokyo fuels OK!

Tokyo fuels OK!

Posted Wed, 30 Nov 2011 20:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Tokyo today is full of small electric cars, but the worldwide thirst for automobilia japonica is less predictable. It's up to Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Mazda and the rest to keep up with demand for various combinations of environmental technology for both city and rural needs.

Tokyo fuels OK!

Learning to read the fossil language

Learning to read the fossil language

Posted Wed, 30 Nov 2011 13:08:00 GMT by Ines Morales

A new study and its implications for the research on paleo-environmental issues. Just how accurate can the fossil record be, when it comes to things like weather cycles or the finer points of ecological health in the global environment?

Learning to read the fossil language

Scitech News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

Turtle! Turn and migrate to the SE Pacific!

Posted Thu, 20 Nov 2014 10:21:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The ultimate rainforest tree thrived in Sundaland.

Posted Sat, 15 Nov 2014 18:54:46 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Cats, as we know them.

Posted Wed, 12 Nov 2014 10:05:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Forest loss in NZ reveals fire prevention ploys.

Posted Sat, 08 Nov 2014 14:46:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Birds run carefully in the rough.

Posted Sun, 02 Nov 2014 19:19:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Our ancient ancestors couldn't digest milk

Posted Thu, 23 Oct 2014 07:48:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Copulation was invented by ancient fish

Posted Mon, 20 Oct 2014 14:20:43 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Stilt break records for migration and finding water.

Posted Wed, 15 Oct 2014 07:05:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Geckos crossed the line and got bigger

Posted Tue, 07 Oct 2014 23:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

As much oxygen as you need

Posted Fri, 03 Oct 2014 17:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Those pesky bacteria

Posted Mon, 31 Oct 2011 19:39:00 GMT by Ines Morales

Flame retardants that fight fire and pollution

Posted Wed, 31 Aug 2011 16:31:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Plant insect-repellent used in Stone Age

Posted Fri, 09 Dec 2011 18:19:01 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Saving bees with new pesticide

Posted Wed, 04 Jun 2014 10:34:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Scientists revise long-held beliefs about plant biodiversity and biomass

Posted Sun, 25 Sep 2011 09:00:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Latest on your blood

Posted Thu, 03 Jul 2014 08:05:19 GMT by JW Dowey

Mono Lake bacteria: Challenging life adaptability

Posted Tue, 07 Dec 2010 09:59:00 GMT by Paromita Pain

Using less fertilizer aids corn for fuel

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 15:07:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Improving electronics by investigating dolphin sonar capabilities

Posted Wed, 18 Jul 2012 11:36:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

African farmers to benefit from genes resistant to cattle 'sleeping sickness'

Posted Mon, 16 May 2011 19:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett