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Pollution News

Marine creatures trapped by toxic plumes with effects on genetic diversity

Marine creatures trapped by toxic plumes with effects on genetic diversity

Posted Fri, 11 Mar 2011 07:20:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Marine pollution does demonstrable harm to sea creatures and new research suggests it also acts as a barrier to movement and makes major changes in the genes of affected populations. The dirtiest outpourings of US land livers are sewage from municipal treatment plants and urban runoff from highly modified river basins.

Marine creatures trapped by toxic plumes with effects on genetic diversity

New centers will examine pollutant mix

New centers will examine pollutant mix

Posted Tue, 08 Mar 2011 17:35:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

We all know chemicals in the air can harm us but new research centers in American universities are getting government cash to examine how pollutants interact. Scientists in American universities will receive money from the US Environmental Agency to investigate how pollution in the air affects us by examining how pollutants act together when mixed. Each of four new centers will receive $8million dollars over the next five years to examine how possibly harmful chemicals interact with each other.

New centers will examine pollutant mix

Tibetan Plateau soot damage driving stronger monsoons

Tibetan Plateau soot damage driving stronger monsoons

Posted Sun, 06 Mar 2011 12:00:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Researchers have found that the effect of soot - rising from the newly industrialised economies of Asia - could have an even more damaging effect on the climate than CO2 in the Himalayas. Researchers at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Universityof Michiganand NOAA looked at the effect of soot on the Tibetan Plateau in the Himalayasand found that soot is a worse offender in climate change than CO2.

Tibetan Plateau soot damage driving stronger monsoons

Plastic Contamination in the Atlantic Ocean

Plastic Contamination in the Atlantic Ocean

Posted Sun, 06 Mar 2011 08:29:00 GMT by Kirsten E. Silven

Discusses the problem of plastic 'islands' in the ocean and what we can do to correct it. It is a tragic fact the Atlantic has large amounts of plastic contamination which is cluttering up the ocean and causing problems with sea life and marine birds. The plastic containers come in all shapes and sizes take practically forever to biodegrade due to their chemical makeup

Plastic Contamination in the Atlantic Ocean

Beijing air pollution levels off the scale

Beijing air pollution levels off the scale

Posted Tue, 01 Mar 2011 23:12:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

As China heads towards revealing a major plan to reduce air pollution, residents of Beijing are suffering from some of the worst air conditions to date. Beijing air quality levels were recorded by the U.S. Embassy staff based in the city as exceeding the standard levels. The maximum level of the air quality charts is 500 API (Air Pollution Index), but in Beijing the recordings soared to a massive 595 API.

Beijing air pollution levels off the scale

Chernobyl 25 years on

Chernobyl 25 years on

Posted Sat, 26 Feb 2011 20:07:07 GMT by Michael Evans

Plants near the devastated Chernobyl nuclear reactor thrive in radioactive soil. On 26 April 1986, at 1.23 am local time, reactor number 4 at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant 62 miles from Kiev in the Ukraine, suffered a massive explosion to its core. The results were catastrophic. Within a few months 28 of the 134 severely exposed emergency workers were to die from acute radiation syndrome and 19 more later died from different causes.

Chernobyl 25 years on

Scott's Antarctic work lives on in new carbon survey

Scott's Antarctic work lives on in new carbon survey

Posted Thu, 24 Feb 2011 17:17:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Tiny Antarctic organisms are growing more quickly because of an increase in carbon say scientists who used the polar legend's century's old collections. Scientists have been examining tiny creatures called bryozoans. These sea-bed dwellers feed on microscopically small marine plants called phytoplankton, which need carbon dioxide to survive.

Scott's Antarctic work lives on in new carbon survey

Now you can check your nitrogen footprint too

Now you can check your nitrogen footprint too

Posted Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:22:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Excess nitrogen is responsible for marine dead-zones, global warming and smog, and now two scientists want us all to measure our nitrogen footprints. Scientists at the University of Virginia have produced a 'nitrogen footprint' calculator to raise awareness of an environmental problem little known outside specialist circles.

Now you can check your nitrogen footprint too

An innovative way of re-using contaminated harbour sediment

An innovative way of re-using contaminated harbour sediment

Posted Tue, 22 Feb 2011 12:12:00 GMT by Michael Evans

A new nethod of making building material using contaminated harbour sediment. Hazardous chemicals and heavy metals that were once commonly used in heavy industry are now rightly subject to strict controls, but their legacy lives on in the environment where polluted soil is a constant problem when a former industrial site is being redeveloped for other uses.

An innovative way of re-using contaminated harbour sediment

UK project gets the fat out of VAT

UK project gets the fat out of VAT

Posted Tue, 22 Feb 2011 09:25:00 GMT by Rachel England

Volunteer group encourages turning waste oil into vehicle fuel. An novel new project in Birmingham sees residents hitting back at the recent VAT rise by turning waste fat into vehicle fuel. The 'Grease Lightening' scheme is working with a disadvantaged Birmingham community to encourage them to recycle their fat, oil and grease.

UK project gets the fat out of VAT

Hudson River fish evolve toxic immunity

Hudson River fish evolve toxic immunity

Posted Sun, 20 Feb 2011 11:34:03 GMT by Lucy Brake

Scientists have discovered fish feeding at the bottom of Hudson River have developed a gene that means they have a special immunity to PCB toxins. Polychlorinated biphenyls, otherwise known as PCBs started to be used in many commercial and industrial products in the late 1920s and up until the late 1970s, when they were finally banned, they polluted major rivers and waterways around the world.

Hudson River fish evolve toxic immunity

Droughts may turn Amazon Rainforest into major polluter, scientists warn

Droughts may turn Amazon Rainforest into major polluter, scientists warn

Posted Fri, 11 Feb 2011 14:55:00 GMT by David Hewitt

Should droughts in the Amazon Basin become more frequent, the days of the rainforest offsetting man-made carbon emissions are set to come to an abrupt end. The days of the Amazon Rainforest acting as a natural buffer against man-made carbon emissions may be drawing to a close. In fact, not only could the South American forest soon lose its status as the planet's most-important 'carbon sink'

Droughts may turn Amazon Rainforest into major polluter, scientists warn

Electric technology zaps away water pollution

Electric technology zaps away water pollution

Posted Fri, 11 Feb 2011 10:48:01 GMT by Laura Goodall

Zapping microbes with electricity could replace tonnes of chemicals used in cleaning up mining wastewater, thanks to scientists who have developed a new water treatment system. Microbes are already used in conventional wastewater treatments to mop up contaminants by adding or removing electrons. But to work effectively, they need to be 'fed' using vast amounts of nutrients and chemicals.

Electric technology zaps away water pollution

Carpooling on the decline as solo driver numbers rise

Carpooling on the decline as solo driver numbers rise

Posted Fri, 11 Feb 2011 08:40:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

Carpooling was once believed to be one of the answers to our traffic congestion and pollution woes, but the latest research shows a picture of decreasing car pooling figures and increasing solo drivers. In the 1980s about one out of every four American was a part of the great car pooling phenomena. Sharing a ride to work was the thing to do and many organisations encouraged and even actively facilitated their employees to be involved in car pooling.

Carpooling on the decline as solo driver numbers rise

China, worlds biggest greenhouse gas emitter introduces more pollution controls

China, worlds biggest greenhouse gas emitter introduces more pollution controls

Posted Wed, 19 Jan 2011 14:22:06 GMT by Louise Murray

China overtook the United States as the world's biggest greenhouse gas emitter in November and is beginning to introduce controls to limit the environmental degradation that accompanies its rapid industrialisation. Already the planet's largest energy consumer and polluter, China has long taken the position that it is the industrialised nations who should be taking up the biggest burden of emissions cuts.

China, worlds biggest greenhouse gas emitter introduces more pollution controls

Good clean water as UK rivers enjoyed great decade

Good clean water as UK rivers enjoyed great decade

Posted Mon, 17 Jan 2011 08:30:00 GMT by Simon Kent

The UK's rivers have enjoyed a great decade. The Environment Agency want this to continue. The UK's Environment Agency has defined the last decade as 'the best for rivers since the industrial revolution'. With dramatic improvements in water quality and the general environment around rivers the results have been seen in the recovery of wildlife in the British countryside.

Good clean water as UK rivers enjoyed great decade

Pollution News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

Air pollution means death in cities

Posted Sun, 17 Aug 2014 13:37:00 GMT by JW Dowey

US lakes have increased threat of toxin

Posted Wed, 06 Aug 2014 08:12:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Alberta Tar Sands pollution evidence is devastating

Posted Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:15:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Old King Coal has a Texan hole?

Posted Fri, 18 Jul 2014 16:50:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Mediterranean demise

Posted Fri, 13 Jun 2014 09:40:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Carbon dioxide's rise and rise

Posted Mon, 09 Jun 2014 10:22:21 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Beach Watch

Posted Thu, 29 May 2014 06:11:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

City clean up with nanotechnology

Posted Mon, 19 May 2014 08:40:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Carbon destroys ocean life as well as our climate

Posted Tue, 15 Apr 2014 06:45:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Ecological challenges in Central Asia

Posted Wed, 19 Mar 2014 08:24:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Nitrate contamination of UK water 'may get worse' fear

Posted Mon, 19 Dec 2011 19:03:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Public Workshops Scheduled by EPA on Housatonic 'Rest of River' Cleanup

Posted Wed, 23 Mar 2011 05:56:00 GMT by Kirsten E. Silven

China, worlds biggest greenhouse gas emitter introduces more pollution controls

Posted Wed, 19 Jan 2011 14:22:06 GMT by Louise Murray

Bleak news from WMO on greenhouse gas levels

Posted Wed, 23 Nov 2011 11:12:47 GMT by Dave Collier

Link from Florida's toilets to coral-killing white pox disease proved

Posted Wed, 17 Aug 2011 21:01:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

How the developed world is hiding its growing emissions

Posted Tue, 26 Apr 2011 16:17:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Ocean acidification puts California mussels at risk

Posted Fri, 15 Jul 2011 15:25:00 GMT by Kieran Ball

Milk and wine is good news for dairy lovers and the planet

Posted Thu, 08 Dec 2011 16:26:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Charging electric cars at night eases ozone haze

Posted Mon, 18 Apr 2011 23:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett