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Echolocation: Call your partner or find your dinner

Echolocation: Call your partner or find your dinner

Posted Wed, 03 Oct 2012 00:01:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Bat echolocation helps them communicate with each other as well as orientation and predation on organisms in air or water.

Echolocation: Call your partner or find your dinner

Largest quake of its kind ever recorded

Largest quake of its kind ever recorded

Posted Wed, 26 Sep 2012 17:00:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Possibly the largest earthquake of its kind has been recorded in the Indian Ocean. At least four faults in the Indo-Australian plate caused a magnitude-8.7 earthquake in April last year, say seismologists.

Largest quake of its kind ever recorded

Vampires of the Deep

Vampires of the Deep

Posted Wed, 26 Sep 2012 09:27:44 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The little-known but well-recorded vampire squid is in fact the sole, relic descendant of a special cephalopod group. They live in the science-fiction-sounding OMZ.

Vampires of the Deep

A First: Knocking the spots off your cheetah

A First: Knocking the spots off your cheetah

Posted Sun, 23 Sep 2012 09:59:22 GMT by Dave Armstrong

There are spotted leopards and striped tigers in the wild, and there are moggies that match their black, striped, tawny or spotted patterns in your home.

A First: Knocking the spots off your cheetah

Nitrogen absorption avoided in sea-lion diving

Nitrogen absorption avoided in sea-lion diving

Posted Wed, 19 Sep 2012 08:43:17 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A new study has been published on sea lions and how they manage to dive to such incredible depths. The exchange of CO2, O2, and N2 is prevented by the collapse of the lungs, helping prevent the sea lion suffering from decompression sickness.

Nitrogen absorption avoided in sea-lion diving

Meet Lesula, Congo's Colourful New Species of Monkey

Meet Lesula, Congo's Colourful New Species of Monkey

Posted Thu, 13 Sep 2012 18:14:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Discovery of a new species of monkey in the Democratic Republic of Congo, described as lesula or Cercopithecus lomamiensis.

Meet Lesula, Congo's Colourful New Species of Monkey

Bold or shy, elk find shooting very selective

Bold or shy, elk find shooting very selective

Posted Tue, 04 Sep 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

New research on elk shows two different personality traits - the 'bold' and the 'shy'. University of Calgary, the University of Alberta and the University College, Dublin publish their paper on elk, and artificial selection by hunters.

Bold or shy, elk find shooting very selective

Cuckoo, cuckoo, new species of bee

Cuckoo, cuckoo, new species of bee

Posted Tue, 04 Sep 2012 11:38:55 GMT by Dave Armstrong

4 new species and a new genus of cuckoo bee have been discovered on the Republic of Cape Verde islands. Cuckoo bees, as their name suggests, quietly find their way into the hives of other bees and arrange the rearing of their own brood.

Cuckoo, cuckoo, new species of bee

The memory of squamates is better than you think

The memory of squamates is better than you think

Posted Wed, 29 Aug 2012 13:39:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A new study investigates spatial memory possibilities in squamate reptiles, with researchers looking specifically at the side-blotched lizard (Uta stansburiana).

The memory of squamates is better than you think

Chimpanzees choose hand clasps by cultural preference

Chimpanzees choose hand clasps by cultural preference

Posted Tue, 28 Aug 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

New study into chimpanzee social grooming behaviour. Researchers investigated cultural differences between four chimpanzee communities by studying differences in chimp grooming hand clasps.

Chimpanzees choose hand clasps by cultural preference

Tail of a rat who won't chew but he's a new species and new genus

Tail of a rat who won't chew but he's a new species and new genus

Posted Tue, 21 Aug 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Paucidentomys vermidax, a new species and genus of rodent has been discovered in the the rainforests of Sulawesi, Indonesia. The new rodent species has lost all its molars, only retaining incisors.

Tail of a rat who won't chew but he's a new species and new genus

Butterfly Mutations post-Fukushima

Butterfly Mutations post-Fukushima

Posted Sat, 18 Aug 2012 13:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

New study investigates the effects of nuclear particles such as iodine on the genotype of butterflies post Fukushima. A short life cycle like the annual butterfly can give us results now that will affect future generations.

Butterfly Mutations post-Fukushima

Hyena Problem Solving - Necessity is the Mother of Innovation

Hyena Problem Solving - Necessity is the Mother of Innovation

Posted Wed, 08 Aug 2012 19:15:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

New research on spotted hyena behaviour has been published. The study looked at diversity of initial exploratory behaviour and innovative problem solving by spotted hyenas in their natural habitat.

Hyena Problem Solving - Necessity is the Mother of Innovation

Endemism - how does it work?

Endemism - how does it work?

Posted Wed, 08 Aug 2012 14:39:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

An island is often a haven for speciation but many mainland species have developed to be endemic in isolated areas too. A new study compares rates of species turnover on Caribbean islands and the Neotropical mainland.

Endemism - how does it work?

Dolphin innovation and culture uses their social abilities

Dolphin innovation and culture uses their social abilities

Posted Wed, 01 Aug 2012 15:51:50 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bottlenose dolphins hunt with sponges by extracting prey organisms on the sea bed and juveniles copy and learn the trait from their mothers. Male dolphins really let the side down.

Dolphin innovation and culture uses their social abilities

New Zealand's avian history provides us with extinction predictors

New Zealand's avian history provides us with extinction predictors

Posted Tue, 31 Jul 2012 23:03:56 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Far from being random, extinction of organisms is often biased. New research done in New Zealand shows that as the type of threat changes, patterns of extinction change dramatically over time.

New Zealand's avian history provides us with extinction predictors

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

Seahorses live further north than we thought

Posted Fri, 30 Jan 2015 20:48:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Naked, unafraid mole rats and longevity

Posted Thu, 29 Jan 2015 08:35:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Waterbirds respond to global warming.

Posted Mon, 26 Jan 2015 20:01:19 GMT by Paul Robinson

Life on Europe

Posted Sun, 25 Jan 2015 12:29:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Fanged frogs and live-bearing feats.

Posted Sun, 18 Jan 2015 15:50:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Whale evolution resolved, but only slightly.

Posted Wed, 14 Jan 2015 10:36:04 GMT by JW Dowey

Gibbon-speak is real language.

Posted Sun, 11 Jan 2015 19:39:12 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Shark self-conservation

Posted Thu, 08 Jan 2015 20:45:19 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Support your local orcas.

Posted Sat, 03 Jan 2015 13:06:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Mongoose inbreeding maintains social system?

Posted Sun, 28 Dec 2014 12:42:23 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The Latest Rapid Assessment of New Species (from Suriname)

Posted Wed, 25 Jan 2012 16:41:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Japan's continuing history of seismic disasters

Posted Mon, 28 Mar 2011 21:16:00 GMT by Michael Evans

A Tale of Thresher Sharks

Posted Mon, 15 Jul 2013 07:15:23 GMT by Paul Robinson

A nightingale sings

Posted Wed, 09 Nov 2011 22:16:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Fossil from prehistoric penguin as tall as humans

Posted Mon, 27 Feb 2012 20:22:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Giant polyandrous bees

Posted Wed, 18 Apr 2012 14:28:50 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Shrimp backs scientists vertical migration theory

Posted Thu, 10 Mar 2011 21:31:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

That Solar Wind and the Aurora Borealis

Posted Mon, 30 Jan 2012 23:12:38 GMT by Dave Armstrong

King Penguins Bravely Head South

Posted Wed, 29 Feb 2012 00:01:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Posted Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:01:00 GMT by JW Dowey