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Bees know what's what

Bees know what's what

Posted Wed, 06 Nov 2013 07:36:56 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Honey bees are now carrying the flag for all invertebrates, as they prove they can solve the geometric puzzles that were given to them. However, when they thought the puzzle was too hard, the point about their cognition was that they were able to 'opt out' and fly away.

Bees know what's what

The Lost World of Australia

The Lost World of Australia

Posted Tue, 29 Oct 2013 07:48:41 GMT by JW Dowey

Who says there’s no excitement, these days. Simply find an isolated stretch of forest and get yourself out there to see if the animals that live there are different from other species. Of course, you’ll need a doctorate involving the study of the species involved and plenty of funding, and a good camera, and somebody who can cook up some good tucker, and great boots, and tracking devices, and---. Well maybe stay home for now and just read about somebody else doing it!

The Lost World of Australia

Smart, social bats use ring-tone cues

Smart, social bats use ring-tone cues

Posted Wed, 23 Oct 2013 08:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The ways in which social information are passed on and when they are useful are intriguing in many animal species. Here the acoustic frequencies of bats were tapped into and their importance as food signals was passed on somehow to other male bats.

Smart, social bats use ring-tone cues

Cuckoos mimic hawks

Cuckoos mimic hawks

Posted Fri, 18 Oct 2013 12:44:30 GMT by Colin Ricketts

We normally regard Batesian mimics as butterflies that pretend to be poisonous, or even snakes. The cuckoo now reveals its subtle disguise as a dangerous predator of small birds, but of course, it's fooling these small birds into letting it lay an egg in their nest.

Cuckoos mimic hawks

'Tiddlers' become evolutionary models

'Tiddlers' become evolutionary models

Posted Wed, 16 Oct 2013 09:35:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Do sticklebacks become larger when they invade the low salinity of freshwater, or do limited resources cause them to become smaller? Both answers are correct, apparently!

'Tiddlers' become evolutionary models

Smallest animals around, for now!

Smallest animals around, for now!

Posted Tue, 01 Oct 2013 09:50:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

A simple summary of some small creatures, missing out some such as the flies and beetles, because I know there will be new discoveries around the corner!

Smallest animals around, for now!

Changing your tune in hummingbirds

Changing your tune in hummingbirds

Posted Wed, 25 Sep 2013 17:40:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

This large hummingbird seems able to be a song-writer as well as a songster.With detailed examination of its song with the latest instruments, we can now say those abilities are equivalent to the brainy parrots!

Changing your tune in hummingbirds

Surprise in bee reproduction

Surprise in bee reproduction

Posted Wed, 25 Sep 2013 04:17:13 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Intriguing comparisons have been made by ancient and modern philosophies about the similarities between the bee and the human. Here is a small sign than altruism is not the only source of the insect’s success.Perhaps the conservation of rare bees will be helped, too, with this discovery.

Surprise in bee reproduction

The bigger the invader, the better

The bigger the invader, the better

Posted Wed, 25 Sep 2013 04:09:02 GMT by JW Dowey

When alien species invade a new habitat, the native biodiversity is reduced, but this is the first study to quantify the changes in the adapting species. Its effect on the invertebrates and native fish is extreme.

The bigger the invader, the better

Animals of the world, complete!

Animals of the world, complete!

Posted Thu, 19 Sep 2013 06:45:00 GMT by JW Dowey

All the animals on earth deserve a better fate. We have made them extinct and rare in so many cases. Now is the time to make some amends by at least listing, as perfectly as possible, the entirety of their species.

Animals of the world, complete!

Travelling orang

Travelling orang

Posted Fri, 13 Sep 2013 10:09:10 GMT by JW Dowey

Sumatran male orang-utans make their intentions clear in this paper on behaviour that makes planning one of those details that makes some animals different.

Travelling orang

Woolly mammoth range dynamics are discovered

Woolly mammoth range dynamics are discovered

Posted Wed, 11 Sep 2013 06:48:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The human influence is discounted as the last continental mammoths died out, being unable to survive in refuges that previously had functioned to ensure their survival.

Woolly mammoth range dynamics are discovered

Mystery Orkney Islands genetics

Mystery Orkney Islands genetics

Posted Mon, 09 Sep 2013 10:11:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

There is no connection between the amazing Neolithic buildings of Skara Brae and neighbouring stone circles and the people who took voles from the Low Countries to the Orkneys! Wrong again.

Mystery Orkney Islands genetics

Four centuries of forestry

Four centuries of forestry

Posted Fri, 06 Sep 2013 12:04:55 GMT by JW Dowey

The first European settlers saw a magnificent and pristine expanse of forest flora and fauna that had not been seen, in Europe, for example, since the Iron Age. Here is its history.

Four centuries of forestry

A squids intelligent mimicry technique

A squids intelligent mimicry technique

Posted Wed, 28 Aug 2013 19:35:57 GMT by Colin Ricketts

When a squid attacks, we think we know what they are up to, but here's one that has a truly novel approach, and a lot of technique, it seems.

A squids intelligent mimicry technique

Goat History

Goat History

Posted Tue, 06 Aug 2013 10:20:28 GMT by Dave Armstrong

When we look at the cultures that use the goat as a symbol, an icon or simply as an image of domesticity, we begin to understand just how long people have used animal species as an integrated part of their lives. The animals also changed to suit us.

Goat History

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

Common dolphins adapt to bay life.

Posted Wed, 28 Sep 2016 09:50:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Evolution of placental lizards gave us advanced skinks,

Posted Tue, 23 Aug 2016 23:00:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Superorganism extraordinaire-a full expose on army ants.

Posted Mon, 08 Aug 2016 14:40:00 GMT by JW Dowey

New Homes for Ants: socialism in insects!

Posted Tue, 19 Jul 2016 21:05:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

How is the goat a close human communicator?

Posted Thu, 07 Jul 2016 12:40:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The human as a speciating force of nature!

Posted Sat, 02 Jul 2016 09:50:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Parrots learn New (Zealand) tricks

Posted Wed, 01 Jun 2016 09:50:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Crow about the success of bird brains.

Posted Wed, 20 Apr 2016 08:30:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Echidnas rule the flames(forest fires)

Posted Wed, 13 Apr 2016 13:20:00 GMT by JW Dowey

History laid bare by genetics.

Posted Sat, 02 Apr 2016 11:05:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Columbus beaten again, by the migration of a songbird!

Posted Wed, 15 Feb 2012 00:07:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Tarantula in the scanner unveils its double-beating heart

Posted Fri, 01 Jul 2011 00:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

A new weapon against invasive species

Posted Wed, 16 Nov 2011 18:22:00 GMT by Ines Morales

Japan's continuing history of seismic disasters

Posted Mon, 28 Mar 2011 21:16:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Discovery of fossilised mouse teeth challenges beliefs about their ancestors

Posted Fri, 27 May 2011 08:59:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

It's a peach of a story

Posted Sat, 06 Sep 2014 23:20:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Smart, social bats use ring-tone cues

Posted Wed, 23 Oct 2013 08:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Changing your tune in hummingbirds

Posted Wed, 25 Sep 2013 17:40:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Polar photography exhibition by Earth Times writer Louise Murray

Posted Sat, 08 Oct 2011 17:55:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Largest group of largest fish shows Mexican waters importance

Posted Thu, 26 May 2011 15:46:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts