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 Spot (or hear) the vole - in the snow

Spot (or hear) the vole - in the snow

Posted Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The ways of the prey organism must be known to an efficient predator, and there are no one more deadly that the mustelid race. Fortunately for humans, we don’t have to hide under the snow as one of these hunters searches above. The nearest I can think of is to be stalked by those fascinating Madagascan fossa..

Spot (or hear) the vole - in the snow

Horse Sense

Horse Sense

Posted Mon, 13 Oct 2014 20:04:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

After the great interest shown by our articles on the recent evolution of dogs, cats and horses, we thought it better to follow these up, rather than spout on about relatively unknown species, much as we’d love to. North Americans love to think that horses belong there, but they became extinct there for an odd combination of circumstances, like camels and many others.

Horse Sense

We’re mad about Madagascar.

We’re mad about Madagascar.

Posted Sat, 11 Oct 2014 09:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

How much research flows out of Madagascar, on the lemurs, chameleons and frogs alone. We have to preserve this island and sustain its people in their struggles with nature, including climate change. The age of introspection is over. This is one planet and we all are one with it – just investigate the biodiversity and the climate change conferences mushrooming in response to popular demands.

We’re mad about Madagascar.

Bad news for corals and divers.

Bad news for corals and divers.

Posted Tue, 07 Oct 2014 08:30:00 GMT by JW Dowey

It’s worrying, because coral is vital to young fish and many predatory organisms that need its shelter, near the surface and full of prey. Hawaii’s remote nature reserves should be free from many human-induced problems, but El Nino cannot be denied. This loss of coral in the summer could be the beginning of a horrific scene of local extinctions. It must be carefully monitored.

Bad news for corals and divers.

Voyage to/from Ancient New Zealand

Voyage to/from Ancient New Zealand

Posted Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:15:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The marvels of the Pacific Islands were not discovered by Europeans. The Polynesians made brave and fantastic voyages across giant stretches of water to colonise much of Oceania. They may have been helped by favourable winds before 1300AD but the means of their success were giant canoes, carrying livestock, food and colonists. Here is the germ of their story.

Voyage to/from Ancient New Zealand

Language evolved quickly.

Language evolved quickly.

Posted Thu, 25 Sep 2014 08:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Some of the great thinkers have come up with ideas to propagate after-dinner discussion of chat and scribble for eons to come. The whole process took a very short time to evolve, according to this “think-tank for talk.”

Language evolved quickly.

Monkeys redden up for breeding.

Monkeys redden up for breeding.

Posted Wed, 24 Sep 2014 07:54:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Humans don’t have sexual coloured skin, but many primates use their colour to attract mates. The red colour of rhesus monkeys attracts the opposite sex, so perhaps there is hope for redheads yet!

Monkeys redden up for breeding.

Budgies negotiate gaps

Budgies negotiate gaps

Posted Sun, 21 Sep 2014 11:06:39 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Flight in our birds and bats is an interesting process as well as a part of life that we always seem to want to emulate. Avoiding obstacles within a flock, or negotiating forests is an area we need to study for our own needs, even if we simply use it for in-flight entertainment. The serious use of bird mechanisms for various aircraft such as drones is always likely as robotic systems develop.

Budgies negotiate gaps

 It's a peach of a story

It's a peach of a story

Posted Sat, 06 Sep 2014 23:20:00 GMT by JW Dowey

How did the peach become selected from the typical forest tree. Was it developed like many fruits as a recent addition to food habits, or did it become domesticated early, like the goat, the dog and the pig, to provide a rich varied diet for early agriculturalists?

It's a peach of a story

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Posted Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:01:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The mammals and the birds are in competition. How many species will we find that can understand tool-using concepts, and then socially interact with their uses?

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Posted Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:44:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The sale of the most remarkable egg ever known is about to take place. Your local museum may not be able to attract the visitors it would like for a simple egg, but the imagination runs wild at the ancient world this egg would have hatched into!

Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Jackdaws lose their winning ways

Jackdaws lose their winning ways

Posted Wed, 06 Aug 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A lovely species like the Eurasian jackdaw could be expected to have an interesting, eventful and full life among its colleagues, his mate and his nestlings. Not so, I’m afraid, for the high-fliers in society.

Jackdaws lose their winning ways

Diet in mammals is complex

Diet in mammals is complex

Posted Wed, 09 Jul 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

How could you classify the diets of mammals for so long without noting the need many species have for fruit, certain plants, or even a bit of animal material for a so-called herbivore? Carnivores need roughage in the same way the human diet has special requirements and herbivores can cheat by gaining essential minerals they would be unable to extract from plants.

Diet in mammals is complex

Forest loss accelerates

Forest loss accelerates

Posted Mon, 30 Jun 2014 08:58:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We need these forests to retain some of the remaining carbon. We need these trees so that biodiversity around them remains. We need these animals to represent something of the old earth, that used to work as an entity. We need to act very very quickly.

Forest loss accelerates

How are butterflies and moths related?

How are butterflies and moths related?

Posted Wed, 25 Jun 2014 07:14:00 GMT by JW Dowey

When science illuminates an area, it's not always easy to see how. In this case we try and show that the brilliant butterfly or moth has a fascinating ancestry and intriguing sets of current relatives. The publication of this paper is great progress, but we doubt if we can fully explain, more than just show the pics and links!

How are butterflies and moths related?

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Posted Wed, 18 Jun 2014 07:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Why and how do island species suffer so much from cats, rats and dogs, and the rest of the invasive species? A few hundred years too late, we might finally be getting around to countering the effects of predators on the most vulnerable of animal species. There are also the native predators to consider, of course.

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 

Teaching is the Oldest Profession.

Posted Tue, 09 Feb 2016 10:47:50 GMT by JW Dowey

Rabbits, rabbits, rabbits - nohare to be seen.

Posted Wed, 27 Jan 2016 21:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Stealth predator avoids predation by chemical crypsis.

Posted Tue, 12 Jan 2016 12:36:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Army ants engineer living bridges!

Posted Wed, 09 Dec 2015 12:26:26 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Human migration vital in the Caucasus.

Posted Mon, 30 Nov 2015 11:18:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Devil rays surviving in the Mediterranean.

Posted Wed, 25 Nov 2015 12:20:05 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Philippine eagle helped by Whitley Award

Posted Fri, 01 May 2015 08:42:42 GMT by JW Dowey

Gibbon families grow larger with bi-female groups.

Posted Tue, 14 Apr 2015 08:06:05 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The owl and the butterfly - and mimicry

Posted Wed, 08 Apr 2015 08:50:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

April Fools, with the naughty bits explained!

Posted Thu, 02 Apr 2015 09:48:52 GMT by JW Dowey

Turtles turn to gelatinous prey

Posted Sun, 16 Jun 2013 11:57:37 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Giant polyandrous bees

Posted Wed, 18 Apr 2012 14:28:50 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The world's dying oceans

Posted Tue, 13 Sep 2011 08:47:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

East vs. West: Lion populations in Africa shown to be genetically different

Posted Mon, 04 Apr 2011 21:35:23 GMT by Helen Roddis

Rare Hihi shows us style is down to diet!

Posted Wed, 13 Feb 2013 01:02:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Endemism - how does it work?

Posted Wed, 08 Aug 2012 14:39:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Brown Bears versus Polar Bears

Posted Mon, 06 Dec 2010 10:11:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Surprise in bee reproduction

Posted Wed, 25 Sep 2013 04:17:13 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Grey seals have real personality

Posted Wed, 23 Nov 2011 18:15:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Central Asian ecology

Posted Tue, 23 Jul 2013 10:23:21 GMT by Paul Robinson