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Lions and tigers lived longer ago

Lions and tigers lived longer ago

Posted Wed, 13 Nov 2013 07:50:00 GMT by JW Dowey

How the lion and the tiger were related to American lions, the jaguar and several extinct species fascinates to the point of absorption. These are legendary, iconic animals whose presence on the planet has always caused us to admire their adaptations and abilities. And to fear their tremendous power, of course.

Lions and tigers lived longer ago

Ancestor of Tyrannosaurus found

Ancestor of Tyrannosaurus found

Posted Thu, 07 Nov 2013 08:58:59 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The sea levels in ancient America seem to have been one of the factors responsible for the isolation and speciation of magnificent beasts in Utah - and then their migration across continents.

Ancestor of Tyrannosaurus found

Bees know what's what

Bees know what's what

Posted Wed, 06 Nov 2013 07:36:56 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Honey bees are now carrying the flag for all invertebrates, as they prove they can solve the geometric puzzles that were given to them. However, when they thought the puzzle was too hard, the point about their cognition was that they were able to 'opt out' and fly away.

Bees know what's what

The Lost World of Australia

The Lost World of Australia

Posted Tue, 29 Oct 2013 07:48:41 GMT by JW Dowey

Who says there’s no excitement, these days. Simply find an isolated stretch of forest and get yourself out there to see if the animals that live there are different from other species. Of course, you’ll need a doctorate involving the study of the species involved and plenty of funding, and a good camera, and somebody who can cook up some good tucker, and great boots, and tracking devices, and---. Well maybe stay home for now and just read about somebody else doing it!

The Lost World of Australia

Smart, social bats use ring-tone cues

Smart, social bats use ring-tone cues

Posted Wed, 23 Oct 2013 08:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The ways in which social information are passed on and when they are useful are intriguing in many animal species. Here the acoustic frequencies of bats were tapped into and their importance as food signals was passed on somehow to other male bats.

Smart, social bats use ring-tone cues

Cuckoos mimic hawks

Cuckoos mimic hawks

Posted Fri, 18 Oct 2013 12:44:30 GMT by Colin Ricketts

We normally regard Batesian mimics as butterflies that pretend to be poisonous, or even snakes. The cuckoo now reveals its subtle disguise as a dangerous predator of small birds, but of course, it's fooling these small birds into letting it lay an egg in their nest.

Cuckoos mimic hawks

'Tiddlers' become evolutionary models

'Tiddlers' become evolutionary models

Posted Wed, 16 Oct 2013 09:35:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Do sticklebacks become larger when they invade the low salinity of freshwater, or do limited resources cause them to become smaller? Both answers are correct, apparently!

'Tiddlers' become evolutionary models

Smallest animals around, for now!

Smallest animals around, for now!

Posted Tue, 01 Oct 2013 09:50:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

A simple summary of some small creatures, missing out some such as the flies and beetles, because I know there will be new discoveries around the corner!

Smallest animals around, for now!

Changing your tune in hummingbirds

Changing your tune in hummingbirds

Posted Wed, 25 Sep 2013 17:40:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

This large hummingbird seems able to be a song-writer as well as a songster.With detailed examination of its song with the latest instruments, we can now say those abilities are equivalent to the brainy parrots!

Changing your tune in hummingbirds

Surprise in bee reproduction

Surprise in bee reproduction

Posted Wed, 25 Sep 2013 04:17:13 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Intriguing comparisons have been made by ancient and modern philosophies about the similarities between the bee and the human. Here is a small sign than altruism is not the only source of the insect’s success.Perhaps the conservation of rare bees will be helped, too, with this discovery.

Surprise in bee reproduction

The bigger the invader, the better

The bigger the invader, the better

Posted Wed, 25 Sep 2013 04:09:02 GMT by JW Dowey

When alien species invade a new habitat, the native biodiversity is reduced, but this is the first study to quantify the changes in the adapting species. Its effect on the invertebrates and native fish is extreme.

The bigger the invader, the better

Animals of the world, complete!

Animals of the world, complete!

Posted Thu, 19 Sep 2013 06:45:00 GMT by JW Dowey

All the animals on earth deserve a better fate. We have made them extinct and rare in so many cases. Now is the time to make some amends by at least listing, as perfectly as possible, the entirety of their species.

Animals of the world, complete!

Travelling orang

Travelling orang

Posted Fri, 13 Sep 2013 10:09:10 GMT by JW Dowey

Sumatran male orang-utans make their intentions clear in this paper on behaviour that makes planning one of those details that makes some animals different.

Travelling orang

Woolly mammoth range dynamics are discovered

Woolly mammoth range dynamics are discovered

Posted Wed, 11 Sep 2013 06:48:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The human influence is discounted as the last continental mammoths died out, being unable to survive in refuges that previously had functioned to ensure their survival.

Woolly mammoth range dynamics are discovered

Mystery Orkney Islands genetics

Mystery Orkney Islands genetics

Posted Mon, 09 Sep 2013 10:11:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

There is no connection between the amazing Neolithic buildings of Skara Brae and neighbouring stone circles and the people who took voles from the Low Countries to the Orkneys! Wrong again.

Mystery Orkney Islands genetics

Four centuries of forestry

Four centuries of forestry

Posted Fri, 06 Sep 2013 12:04:55 GMT by JW Dowey

The first European settlers saw a magnificent and pristine expanse of forest flora and fauna that had not been seen, in Europe, for example, since the Iron Age. Here is its history.

Four centuries of forestry

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

The artful crocodiles can hunt cooperatively.

Posted Sat, 22 Nov 2014 20:44:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Monkeys' and apes' cultural learning

Posted Wed, 12 Nov 2014 04:00:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Oil palm ecology suits some.

Posted Tue, 11 Nov 2014 17:40:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Cultures can exist beyond the (naked) apes.

Posted Wed, 05 Nov 2014 07:00:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Spot (or hear) the vole - in the snow

Posted Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Horse Sense

Posted Mon, 13 Oct 2014 20:04:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We’re mad about Madagascar.

Posted Sat, 11 Oct 2014 09:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bad news for corals and divers.

Posted Tue, 07 Oct 2014 08:30:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Voyage to/from Ancient New Zealand

Posted Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:15:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Language evolved quickly.

Posted Thu, 25 Sep 2014 08:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bitterling battle between parasite and host

Posted Wed, 15 Feb 2012 00:02:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Ancestor of Tyrannosaurus found

Posted Thu, 07 Nov 2013 08:58:59 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Forget cats - it's escaped pet snakes wreaking havoc in Florida Everglades

Posted Sat, 12 Mar 2011 16:57:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Remarkable rodent rediscovered after 113 years

Posted Thu, 19 May 2011 13:51:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Record-breaking 2010 Amazon drought seen from space

Posted Wed, 30 Mar 2011 12:28:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Largest group of largest fish shows Mexican waters importance

Posted Thu, 26 May 2011 15:46:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Born to roar - but lions are just big cry babies says new study

Posted Wed, 02 Nov 2011 21:01:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Icelandic volcano threatens travel plans - Update

Posted Tue, 24 May 2011 12:12:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Deadly tornado rips through Joplin, Missouri

Posted Tue, 24 May 2011 21:11:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

The hunting leech

Posted Tue, 01 Nov 2011 17:09:00 GMT by Ines Morales