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Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Posted Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:40:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Viruses affecting honey bees can cross over from other species of native pollinator and vice versa. The decline in pollinator populations during the past two decades has caused major concern in the agricultural and scientific community. Pollinators of all types are vital to agriculture and are responsible for the production of crops worth US$225 billion worldwide. In the United States alone honey bees account for an added market crop exceeding US$15 million.

Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog

Posted Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:10:02 GMT by Michael Evans

Chaser is a super smart border collie who can recognise and understand the names of 1022 objects. Many readers will have seen or read of amazing animals who can count, or respond to complex commands. Most of these are the result of simple stage tricks, but researchers at South Carolina's prestigious Wofford College have Chaser the Wonder Dog.

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog

Global Warming could put an end to North Sea Cod

Global Warming could put an end to North Sea Cod

Posted Mon, 17 Jan 2011 08:50:00 GMT by Lynn Parr

A new study shows that increasing water temperature in the North Sea is pushing zooplankton species further north, resulting in less food for young cod. Global warming will adversely affect the recovery of the Atlantic Cod in the North Sea, a new study shows.

Global Warming could put an end to North Sea Cod

Busy as bee? They need their rest too!

Busy as bee? They need their rest too!

Posted Wed, 12 Jan 2011 08:29:00 GMT by Paromita Pain

Its not just humans but bees too need their rest. A recent study by the University of Texas at Austin shows that sleep-deprived honey bees also experienced communication problems. Dr. Barrett Klein, a ecology, evolution and behavior researcher at the university says that they advertised the direction to a food site less precisely to their fellow bees.

Busy as bee? They need their rest too!

Family social stress affects children - even birds

Family social stress affects children - even birds

Posted Mon, 10 Jan 2011 12:11:23 GMT by Michael Evans

Franco-Austrian study indicates that stressed female birds can lay eggs that produce stressed chicks. The debate between nature and nurture first began in the mid-19th century when Charles Darwin's cousin, Francis Galton raised the question of whether hereditary or environmental factors were the prime influences with respect to social advancement.

Family social stress affects children - even birds

How invasive species can trigger mass extinctions

How invasive species can trigger mass extinctions

Posted Fri, 07 Jan 2011 11:26:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Researchers from Ohio suggest that human activity that is allowing the introduction of invasive species into ecosystems tcould potentially lead to the Eath's sixth mass extinction. 65 million years ago dinosaurs dominated the Earth. Global temperatures were between six and 14 degrees Celsius warmer than at present and sea levels were over 300 metres higher. 40% of the present land mass was under the sea.

How invasive species can trigger mass extinctions

Pesticides threaten social, ecological aspect of ant hunting in Brazil

Pesticides threaten social, ecological aspect of ant hunting in Brazil

Posted Fri, 07 Jan 2011 11:03:12 GMT by Paromita Pain

Içás, or queen ants in Brazil are a delicacy. Spring rains in October and November drive the ants out of the ground, and for a few short weeks. But this year pesticides have threatened the social and the ecological aspect of ant hunting. The principal culprits are pesticides used on eucalyptus trees that are planted to produce cellulose for paper and other products.

Pesticides threaten social, ecological aspect of ant hunting in Brazil

The Silvereye Learns to Shout Above Traffic

The Silvereye Learns to Shout Above Traffic

Posted Fri, 07 Jan 2011 09:12:46 GMT by Lynn Parr

One species of Australian bird, the silvereye, has been found to change its songs to compensate for lound traffic noise in urban areas. Some Australian birds are learning to shout to make themselves heard above traffic noise. The silvereye in urban environments have been found to sing higher-pitched but slower songs than those in rural areas.

The Silvereye Learns to Shout Above Traffic

Super Efficient Feeding Habits of Blue Whales

Super Efficient Feeding Habits of Blue Whales

Posted Tue, 04 Jan 2011 09:56:54 GMT by Michael Evans

A Canadian study to contrast the amount of energy a blue whale could expend during one dive, with the amount of energy it could get from the food it collected. As most people will know, the blue whale is the largest animal alive and probably the largest animal that has ever lived. When a blue whale calf is born it is as big as a fully-grown hippopotamus and during its first seven months it will drink about 400 litres of its mother's milk every day.

Super Efficient Feeding Habits of Blue Whales

Bumblebee Paper by 8 to 10-year-olds published by Royal Society

Bumblebee Paper by 8 to 10-year-olds published by Royal Society

Posted Wed, 29 Dec 2010 09:11:00 GMT by Paromita Pain

Biology Letters, a peer-reviewed journal of Britain's Royal Society, on Wednesday published a report (complete with colored-pencil diagrams) on how bumblebees see colors and patterns -- conducted and written by a group of 8 to 10-year-olds in Devon, England. They reported that the bees were capable of learning and remembering cues based on color and pattern -- a finding that the Royal Society called ''a genuine advance.''

Bumblebee Paper by 8 to 10-year-olds published by Royal Society

Celebrating the years: Red-tailed hawk style

Celebrating the years: Red-tailed hawk style

Posted Wed, 22 Dec 2010 08:03:55 GMT by Paromita Pain

A red tailed hawk recently found in New York is being deemed to be the oldest hawk in history. The bird's age from a ring on its leg puts its age at 27 years. A female, this is remarkable because most red tailed hawks don't survive beyond 10 to 12 years.

Celebrating the years: Red-tailed hawk style

Volcano proves a big draw for American tourists

Volcano proves a big draw for American tourists

Posted Mon, 20 Dec 2010 08:45:00 GMT by John Dean

Eyjafjallajokull volcano created misery for millions of travellers, it resulted in a 16 per cent increase in tourism from North America to the island for the first eleven months of 2010, compared with the same period last year.

Volcano proves a big draw for American tourists

Be a bee fan: New York agrees to beekeepers

Be a bee fan: New York agrees to beekeepers

Posted Tue, 14 Dec 2010 20:35:01 GMT by Paromita Pain

New York City made beekeeping legal recently. It has changed the way residents view bees. No longer are they just pesky 'bugs'. People are now going out of their way to understand the importance of bees in the environmental and becoming avid beekeepers.The city has safety features in place to keep keepers and people safe.

Be a bee fan: New York agrees to beekeepers

Major increase in numbers of whales and dolphins stranded on UK beaches, figures show

Major increase in numbers of whales and dolphins stranded on UK beaches, figures show

Posted Thu, 09 Dec 2010 08:27:01 GMT by David Hewitt

The number of whales and dolphins being beached along the UK coastline has soared dramatically over the past few years, the latest statistics show. Britons are being called upon to watch out for stranded whales and dolphins as conservationists look to explain the ongoing rise in the number being washed onto the nation's beaches..

Major increase in numbers of whales and dolphins stranded on UK beaches, figures show

Experience the Wild Wonders of Europe in stunning photographs

Experience the Wild Wonders of Europe in stunning photographs

Posted Tue, 07 Dec 2010 16:39:00 GMT by Julian Jackson

Win a beautiful book as a prize in Earthtimes' first competition. Wild Wonders of Europe is the world's biggest nature photography conservation project ever. Sixty-nine top nature photographers were sent on 125 assignments to 48 countries, visiting nature reserves.

Experience the Wild Wonders of Europe in stunning photographs

Brown Bears versus Polar Bears

Brown Bears versus Polar Bears

Posted Mon, 06 Dec 2010 10:11:00 GMT by Michael Evans

The bleak future for polar bears as global warming encourages brown bears to range further north. Something that is not widely realised is that polar bears only evolved as a distinctive species as recently as 200,000 years ago during the Pleistocene.

Brown Bears versus Polar Bears

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

Jackdaws lose their winning ways

Posted Wed, 06 Aug 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Diet in mammals is complex

Posted Wed, 09 Jul 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Forest loss accelerates

Posted Mon, 30 Jun 2014 08:58:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

How are butterflies and moths related?

Posted Wed, 25 Jun 2014 07:14:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Posted Wed, 18 Jun 2014 07:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bear with us

Posted Tue, 10 Jun 2014 06:50:28 GMT by JW Dowey

Gannets prove to be discard specialists

Posted Wed, 04 Jun 2014 11:32:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Desert memories and route guidance - for ants

Posted Wed, 28 May 2014 12:08:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The whales don't mix between ocean basins

Posted Wed, 21 May 2014 00:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Tiny Australian crayfish is brand new species

Posted Wed, 09 Apr 2014 07:55:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

New flood warnings for New York as Tropical Storm crosses northeast

Posted Wed, 07 Sep 2011 15:46:00 GMT by Laura Brown

Stranded calf whale freed after 8 hour battle

Posted Wed, 07 Sep 2011 09:45:10 GMT by Laura Brown

Saith the Fly to the Spider

Posted Tue, 08 May 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Global Warming could put an end to North Sea Cod

Posted Mon, 17 Jan 2011 08:50:00 GMT by Lynn Parr

A high-speed camera reveals the secrets of a leaping frog

Posted Thu, 17 Nov 2011 21:35:00 GMT by Dave Collier

500 Texas homes destroyed by wildfires

Posted Tue, 06 Sep 2011 09:14:00 GMT by Laura Brown

Whales don't eat gulls, so why?

Posted Tue, 02 Jul 2013 15:48:01 GMT by JW Dowey

Colobus chorus

Posted Tue, 29 Nov 2011 18:12:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Earthquake damage report for 2011 published by CATDAT

Posted Sun, 22 Jan 2012 00:39:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Hurricane Katia becomes category 4 storm

Posted Tue, 06 Sep 2011 08:56:56 GMT by Laura Brown