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Something old, something blue - how cyanobacteria are helping forests grow

Something old, something blue - how cyanobacteria are helping forests grow

Posted Fri, 25 Feb 2011 14:55:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Exciting research into the rain forests of British Columbia show that the blue bacteria living on mosses on the oldest trees have a big impact on the nutrient cycle of these forests. The more old trees there are, the more nitrogen is fixed, so helping forests grow. This helps our understanding of the forest nitrogen cycle, but raises new questions about the impact of forest age on greenhouse gases.

Something old, something blue - how cyanobacteria are helping forests grow

New bird discovery raises profile of Madagascar's endangered dry forests

New bird discovery raises profile of Madagascar's endangered dry forests

Posted Fri, 25 Feb 2011 14:26:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

A new bird, and a new hope for a threatened ecosystem. The Beanka Forest of Madagascar, an area rich in biodiversity, continues to contribute species new to science, heightening concerns about its protection. Local conservation groups are seeking to protect these unique dry forests by enlisting the help of locals, and addressing their needs.

New bird discovery raises profile of Madagascar's endangered dry forests

Further Wildlife Deaths Linked To Gulf Oil Spill

Further Wildlife Deaths Linked To Gulf Oil Spill

Posted Thu, 24 Feb 2011 18:29:01 GMT by Kieran Ball

Almost a year later, the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is still affecting wildlife. An unusual increase in the mortality rate among dolphins on the Alabama and Mississippi coasts is being reported this week. At least 24 dolphins have died since the beginning of the year, the majority of which have been infant dolphins, either aborted or stillborn during the calving season.

Further Wildlife Deaths Linked To Gulf Oil Spill

Coral Reefs in Crisis

Coral Reefs in Crisis

Posted Wed, 23 Feb 2011 21:24:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Reefs at Risk Revisited finds that three quarters of the world's coral reefs are under threat. Reefs at Risk Revisited, a World Resources Institute (WRI) project, is a groundbreaking analysis of threats to the world's coral reefs. This comprehensive assessment  found that three quarters of the world's coral reefs are under threat from pollution, overfishing and climate change.

Coral Reefs in Crisis

Oysters in danger of extinction

Oysters in danger of extinction

Posted Mon, 14 Feb 2011 15:01:01 GMT by Astrid Madsen

Despite their resilience, oysters numbers are falling. Over the past century 85% of oyster reefs have been lost globally, and in most bays 90% of them are functionally extinct. That's according to a study published in the journal Bioscience by a team of American marine scientists.

Oysters in danger of extinction

A Dutch study of the development of river deltas

A Dutch study of the development of river deltas

Posted Mon, 14 Feb 2011 09:38:00 GMT by Michael Evans

A study of subsoil patterns to help to understnd the formation of deltas and the management of rivers. Researchers at the Delft University of Technology (TU Deft) have been adding information about the subsoil to an existing sedimentation and erosion model to obtain a clearer picture of how rivers and deltas develop over time.

A Dutch study of the development of river deltas

Nations 'need to work together' to save wildlife

Nations 'need to work together' to save wildlife

Posted Sun, 13 Feb 2011 12:41:00 GMT by John Dean

Countries will have to improve their co-operation if they are to protect endangered wildlife in an age of climate change, according to an international study. A team of scientists have come up with a conservation index designed to help policy-makers to deal with the effects of climate change on birds in Africa, the theory of which could help governments across the world as climate change forces species to move to new areas.

Nations 'need to work together' to save wildlife

Sea cucumbers. A big future for this sea creature?

Sea cucumbers. A big future for this sea creature?

Posted Fri, 11 Feb 2011 12:52:00 GMT by John Dean

A humble sea creature is being hailed as the possible solution in the campaign to save the world's oceans from pollution. Scientists at Newcastle University, in North East England, working with colleagues in Africa, say the sea cucumber is important because it is responsible for cleaning up the sea bed by consuming and mixing marine sediments.

Sea cucumbers. A big future for this sea creature?

England's most-important natural refuges identified

England's most-important natural refuges identified

Posted Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:26:00 GMT by David Hewitt

A handful of unremarkable spots are serving as valuable refuges for England's rarest species, a new report has revealed. England's rarest species of animals are not majestic eagles or regal deer, nor are the country's most important natural sites to be found in any of the popular National Parks. Instead, the rarest plants and animals are to be found - usually with a magnifying glass - in some of less presupposing parts of this green and pleasant land.

England's most-important natural refuges identified

Yet another natural disaster in the offing for California

Yet another natural disaster in the offing for California

Posted Wed, 26 Jan 2011 11:55:00 GMT by Michael Evans

We are used to hearing that an earthquake will be the next natural disaster in California, but a recent study suggests that a severe storm is just as likely and could cause three times as much damage.

Yet another natural disaster in the offing for California

Disrupted routine causes feline hypochondria

Disrupted routine causes feline hypochondria

Posted Wed, 19 Jan 2011 07:04:01 GMT by Michael Evans

Domestic cats show symptoms of illness when routine is disturbed. For thousands of years people all over the world have kept cats as household pets. The earliest known example comes from a grave that was discovered in Cyprus in 2004. It and contains two skeletons laid closely together, one of a human and the other of a cat and is believed to be 9,500 years old.

Disrupted routine causes feline hypochondria

Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Posted Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:40:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Viruses affecting honey bees can cross over from other species of native pollinator and vice versa. The decline in pollinator populations during the past two decades has caused major concern in the agricultural and scientific community. Pollinators of all types are vital to agriculture and are responsible for the production of crops worth US$225 billion worldwide. In the United States alone honey bees account for an added market crop exceeding US$15 million.

Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog

Posted Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:10:02 GMT by Michael Evans

Chaser is a super smart border collie who can recognise and understand the names of 1022 objects. Many readers will have seen or read of amazing animals who can count, or respond to complex commands. Most of these are the result of simple stage tricks, but researchers at South Carolina's prestigious Wofford College have Chaser the Wonder Dog.

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog

Global Warming could put an end to North Sea Cod

Global Warming could put an end to North Sea Cod

Posted Mon, 17 Jan 2011 08:50:00 GMT by Lynn Parr

A new study shows that increasing water temperature in the North Sea is pushing zooplankton species further north, resulting in less food for young cod. Global warming will adversely affect the recovery of the Atlantic Cod in the North Sea, a new study shows.

Global Warming could put an end to North Sea Cod

Busy as bee? They need their rest too!

Busy as bee? They need their rest too!

Posted Wed, 12 Jan 2011 08:29:00 GMT by Paromita Pain

Its not just humans but bees too need their rest. A recent study by the University of Texas at Austin shows that sleep-deprived honey bees also experienced communication problems. Dr. Barrett Klein, a ecology, evolution and behavior researcher at the university says that they advertised the direction to a food site less precisely to their fellow bees.

Busy as bee? They need their rest too!

Family social stress affects children - even birds

Family social stress affects children - even birds

Posted Mon, 10 Jan 2011 12:11:23 GMT by Michael Evans

Franco-Austrian study indicates that stressed female birds can lay eggs that produce stressed chicks. The debate between nature and nurture first began in the mid-19th century when Charles Darwin's cousin, Francis Galton raised the question of whether hereditary or environmental factors were the prime influences with respect to social advancement.

Family social stress affects children - even birds

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

Spot (or hear) the vole - in the snow

Posted Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Horse Sense

Posted Mon, 13 Oct 2014 20:04:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We’re mad about Madagascar.

Posted Sat, 11 Oct 2014 09:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bad news for corals and divers.

Posted Tue, 07 Oct 2014 08:30:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Voyage to/from Ancient New Zealand

Posted Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:15:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Language evolved quickly.

Posted Thu, 25 Sep 2014 08:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Monkeys redden up for breeding.

Posted Wed, 24 Sep 2014 07:54:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Budgies negotiate gaps

Posted Sun, 21 Sep 2014 11:06:39 GMT by Dave Armstrong

It's a peach of a story

Posted Sat, 06 Sep 2014 23:20:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Posted Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:01:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Four centuries of forestry

Posted Fri, 06 Sep 2013 12:04:55 GMT by JW Dowey

Survival of the unfittest can work for bacteria

Posted Mon, 28 Mar 2011 14:55:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Travelling orang

Posted Fri, 13 Sep 2013 10:09:10 GMT by JW Dowey

Whales suffering sunburn in Gulf of California

Posted Wed, 10 Nov 2010 14:01:00 GMT by Emma McNeil

Natural Curiosities and top ten animals

Posted Tue, 18 Feb 2014 07:45:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Polar photography exhibition by Earth Times writer Louise Murray

Posted Sat, 08 Oct 2011 17:55:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Posted Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:40:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Losing sight of the real causes of mass animal death?

Posted Tue, 08 Mar 2011 16:15:00 GMT by Kieran Ball

Sloth dung points to stark future for Joshua Trees

Posted Fri, 25 Mar 2011 12:02:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Ancestor of Tyrannosaurus found

Posted Thu, 07 Nov 2013 08:58:59 GMT by Dave Armstrong