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Oysters in danger of extinction

Oysters in danger of extinction

Posted Mon, 14 Feb 2011 15:01:01 GMT by Astrid Madsen

Despite their resilience, oysters numbers are falling. Over the past century 85% of oyster reefs have been lost globally, and in most bays 90% of them are functionally extinct. That's according to a study published in the journal Bioscience by a team of American marine scientists.

Oysters in danger of extinction

A Dutch study of the development of river deltas

A Dutch study of the development of river deltas

Posted Mon, 14 Feb 2011 09:38:00 GMT by Michael Evans

A study of subsoil patterns to help to understnd the formation of deltas and the management of rivers. Researchers at the Delft University of Technology (TU Deft) have been adding information about the subsoil to an existing sedimentation and erosion model to obtain a clearer picture of how rivers and deltas develop over time.

A Dutch study of the development of river deltas

Nations 'need to work together' to save wildlife

Nations 'need to work together' to save wildlife

Posted Sun, 13 Feb 2011 12:41:00 GMT by John Dean

Countries will have to improve their co-operation if they are to protect endangered wildlife in an age of climate change, according to an international study. A team of scientists have come up with a conservation index designed to help policy-makers to deal with the effects of climate change on birds in Africa, the theory of which could help governments across the world as climate change forces species to move to new areas.

Nations 'need to work together' to save wildlife

Sea cucumbers. A big future for this sea creature?

Sea cucumbers. A big future for this sea creature?

Posted Fri, 11 Feb 2011 12:52:00 GMT by John Dean

A humble sea creature is being hailed as the possible solution in the campaign to save the world's oceans from pollution. Scientists at Newcastle University, in North East England, working with colleagues in Africa, say the sea cucumber is important because it is responsible for cleaning up the sea bed by consuming and mixing marine sediments.

Sea cucumbers. A big future for this sea creature?

England's most-important natural refuges identified

England's most-important natural refuges identified

Posted Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:26:00 GMT by David Hewitt

A handful of unremarkable spots are serving as valuable refuges for England's rarest species, a new report has revealed. England's rarest species of animals are not majestic eagles or regal deer, nor are the country's most important natural sites to be found in any of the popular National Parks. Instead, the rarest plants and animals are to be found - usually with a magnifying glass - in some of less presupposing parts of this green and pleasant land.

England's most-important natural refuges identified

Yet another natural disaster in the offing for California

Yet another natural disaster in the offing for California

Posted Wed, 26 Jan 2011 11:55:00 GMT by Michael Evans

We are used to hearing that an earthquake will be the next natural disaster in California, but a recent study suggests that a severe storm is just as likely and could cause three times as much damage.

Yet another natural disaster in the offing for California

Disrupted routine causes feline hypochondria

Disrupted routine causes feline hypochondria

Posted Wed, 19 Jan 2011 07:04:01 GMT by Michael Evans

Domestic cats show symptoms of illness when routine is disturbed. For thousands of years people all over the world have kept cats as household pets. The earliest known example comes from a grave that was discovered in Cyprus in 2004. It and contains two skeletons laid closely together, one of a human and the other of a cat and is believed to be 9,500 years old.

Disrupted routine causes feline hypochondria

Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Posted Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:40:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Viruses affecting honey bees can cross over from other species of native pollinator and vice versa. The decline in pollinator populations during the past two decades has caused major concern in the agricultural and scientific community. Pollinators of all types are vital to agriculture and are responsible for the production of crops worth US$225 billion worldwide. In the United States alone honey bees account for an added market crop exceeding US$15 million.

Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog

Posted Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:10:02 GMT by Michael Evans

Chaser is a super smart border collie who can recognise and understand the names of 1022 objects. Many readers will have seen or read of amazing animals who can count, or respond to complex commands. Most of these are the result of simple stage tricks, but researchers at South Carolina's prestigious Wofford College have Chaser the Wonder Dog.

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog

Global Warming could put an end to North Sea Cod

Global Warming could put an end to North Sea Cod

Posted Mon, 17 Jan 2011 08:50:00 GMT by Lynn Parr

A new study shows that increasing water temperature in the North Sea is pushing zooplankton species further north, resulting in less food for young cod. Global warming will adversely affect the recovery of the Atlantic Cod in the North Sea, a new study shows.

Global Warming could put an end to North Sea Cod

Busy as bee? They need their rest too!

Busy as bee? They need their rest too!

Posted Wed, 12 Jan 2011 08:29:00 GMT by Paromita Pain

Its not just humans but bees too need their rest. A recent study by the University of Texas at Austin shows that sleep-deprived honey bees also experienced communication problems. Dr. Barrett Klein, a ecology, evolution and behavior researcher at the university says that they advertised the direction to a food site less precisely to their fellow bees.

Busy as bee? They need their rest too!

Family social stress affects children - even birds

Family social stress affects children - even birds

Posted Mon, 10 Jan 2011 12:11:23 GMT by Michael Evans

Franco-Austrian study indicates that stressed female birds can lay eggs that produce stressed chicks. The debate between nature and nurture first began in the mid-19th century when Charles Darwin's cousin, Francis Galton raised the question of whether hereditary or environmental factors were the prime influences with respect to social advancement.

Family social stress affects children - even birds

How invasive species can trigger mass extinctions

How invasive species can trigger mass extinctions

Posted Fri, 07 Jan 2011 11:26:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Researchers from Ohio suggest that human activity that is allowing the introduction of invasive species into ecosystems tcould potentially lead to the Eath's sixth mass extinction. 65 million years ago dinosaurs dominated the Earth. Global temperatures were between six and 14 degrees Celsius warmer than at present and sea levels were over 300 metres higher. 40% of the present land mass was under the sea.

How invasive species can trigger mass extinctions

Pesticides threaten social, ecological aspect of ant hunting in Brazil

Pesticides threaten social, ecological aspect of ant hunting in Brazil

Posted Fri, 07 Jan 2011 11:03:12 GMT by Paromita Pain

Içás, or queen ants in Brazil are a delicacy. Spring rains in October and November drive the ants out of the ground, and for a few short weeks. But this year pesticides have threatened the social and the ecological aspect of ant hunting. The principal culprits are pesticides used on eucalyptus trees that are planted to produce cellulose for paper and other products.

Pesticides threaten social, ecological aspect of ant hunting in Brazil

The Silvereye Learns to Shout Above Traffic

The Silvereye Learns to Shout Above Traffic

Posted Fri, 07 Jan 2011 09:12:46 GMT by Lynn Parr

One species of Australian bird, the silvereye, has been found to change its songs to compensate for lound traffic noise in urban areas. Some Australian birds are learning to shout to make themselves heard above traffic noise. The silvereye in urban environments have been found to sing higher-pitched but slower songs than those in rural areas.

The Silvereye Learns to Shout Above Traffic

Super Efficient Feeding Habits of Blue Whales

Super Efficient Feeding Habits of Blue Whales

Posted Tue, 04 Jan 2011 09:56:54 GMT by Michael Evans

A Canadian study to contrast the amount of energy a blue whale could expend during one dive, with the amount of energy it could get from the food it collected. As most people will know, the blue whale is the largest animal alive and probably the largest animal that has ever lived. When a blue whale calf is born it is as big as a fully-grown hippopotamus and during its first seven months it will drink about 400 litres of its mother's milk every day.

Super Efficient Feeding Habits of Blue Whales

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

Tiny Australian crayfish is brand new species

Posted Wed, 09 Apr 2014 07:55:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Visual effects created by bower birds

Posted Wed, 02 Apr 2014 08:51:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Spider sociability

Posted Wed, 26 Mar 2014 10:00:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Bats' flight changes

Posted Wed, 19 Mar 2014 11:53:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The jumper, the weaver and the spitting spider

Posted Thu, 13 Mar 2014 07:27:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Natural Curiosities and top ten animals

Posted Tue, 18 Feb 2014 07:45:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Interesting albatross personalities

Posted Sun, 09 Feb 2014 07:55:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Interesting frog father behaviour

Posted Tue, 21 Jan 2014 20:22:33 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Tropical forests have been downed before!

Posted Sat, 18 Jan 2014 13:30:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Ocean acidity experience improves offspring responses

Posted Wed, 08 Jan 2014 10:25:01 GMT by JW Dowey

Lone Male Black Bears Responsible for Most Attacks on Humans

Posted Wed, 11 May 2011 16:29:00 GMT by Kieran Ball

Bad news for bees and us

Posted Thu, 10 Mar 2011 22:03:02 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Invasive coconut-smelling ants reach Hawaii

Posted Wed, 02 Nov 2011 19:44:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Honey Bee Numbers Drop

Posted Fri, 14 Jun 2013 19:22:40 GMT by JW Dowey

Singing Cousins

Posted Thu, 29 Sep 2011 10:38:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Hopes up for species survival

Posted Mon, 23 May 2011 02:54:01 GMT by Gracie Valena

Could flirting make males age faster?

Posted Fri, 05 Aug 2011 12:41:00 GMT by Kieran Ball

Jumping like a fish out of water

Posted Thu, 06 Oct 2011 17:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Volcano proves a big draw for American tourists

Posted Mon, 20 Dec 2010 08:45:00 GMT by John Dean

Marine reserve's dramatic recovery shocks scientists

Posted Sun, 14 Aug 2011 21:44:01 GMT by Melanie J. Martin