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Record-breaking 2010 Amazon drought seen from space

Record-breaking 2010 Amazon drought seen from space

Posted Wed, 30 Mar 2011 12:28:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Last summer's drought in the Amazon left vast swathes of forest visibly stressed, according to a study of images from 2 NASA satellites. This worryingly matches the predictions of drier, harsher times for one of the world's most biodiverse areas - and sets the scene for possible massive outpouring of CO2.

Record-breaking 2010 Amazon drought seen from space

New species of green pit viper snake discovered

New species of green pit viper snake discovered

Posted Wed, 30 Mar 2011 10:24:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

A new green pit viper has been found by scientists working in the forests of Southeast Asia. An undiscovered species of snake, which has been called the ruby-eyed green pit viper, was found nestled into a tree branch by researchers studying snakes in Southeast Asia. They captured the stunning creature in a photograph which has been used to help identify it as a new species previously unknown to humans.

New species of green pit viper snake discovered

Mountain gorillas face human health hazard

Mountain gorillas face human health hazard

Posted Tue, 29 Mar 2011 15:07:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Mountain gorillas are under assault from a new enemy - human pneumonia-type viruses - according to research published in Emerging Infectious Diseases. The closeness of our relationship to our magnificent genetic cousins has led to this increased disease risk, that may well require changes to our approaches to conserve them.

Mountain gorillas face human health hazard

Japan's continuing history of seismic disasters

Japan's continuing history of seismic disasters

Posted Mon, 28 Mar 2011 21:16:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Throughout its history Japan has been subject to seismic disasters. This latest one shows no sign of abating and could even result in a global catastrophe. As if this catastrophe was not enough, the crippling of the Fukushima No 1 power plant has exposed a mortifying catalogue of complacency and shortfalls in safety procedures. Conflicting stories and evasive explanations became the norm once it was clear that things were going badly wrong

Japan's continuing history of seismic disasters

Survival of the unfittest can work for bacteria

Survival of the unfittest can work for bacteria

Posted Mon, 28 Mar 2011 14:55:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Evolution doesn't always favor the fit, according to a new paper in Nature. In certain circumstances, both fit and unfit bacteria can live in diverse communities, even in very simple environments. The key factor is how mutation rates and food-exploiting efficiency are interlinked - it turns out that the best bacteria are often prone to higher levels of mutation.

Survival of the unfittest can work for bacteria

'Songs For Japan' album released

'Songs For Japan' album released

Posted Mon, 28 Mar 2011 14:36:00 GMT by Andy Tillett

'Songs for Japan' featuring U2, Lady Gaga, Beyonce Knowles and Justin Timberlake has been released through online music store iTunes. The compilation album sees 38 artists donate tracks and waive royalties to benefit the Japanese Red Cross Society's relief efforts in the country, which was devastated by a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami earlier this month.

'Songs For Japan' album released

UK's Buglife invites the nation on an Oil Beetle Hunt!

UK's Buglife invites the nation on an Oil Beetle Hunt!

Posted Sun, 27 Mar 2011 10:30:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

With the UK's hedgerows abuzz again as spring finally unfurls, the charity for creepy-crawly conservation, Buglife, is calling on all garden adventurers to join them on an Oil Beetle Hunt. Keep your eyes peeled, identify them and then upload your sightings - photos and all - to help save one the UK's most beautiful but threatened bug species.

UK's Buglife invites the nation on an Oil Beetle Hunt!

Sloth dung points to stark future for Joshua Trees

Sloth dung points to stark future for Joshua Trees

Posted Fri, 25 Mar 2011 12:02:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

The Joshua tree could be badly affected by this century's predicted temperature rise - it could be eliminated from up to 90% of its current range. That's the message coming from sloth dung, which scientists have pored over to discern the effect of prior periods of warming on the Joshua tree.

Sloth dung points to stark future for Joshua Trees

From garbage tip to wildlife haven - new theory for Everglades tree islands

From garbage tip to wildlife haven - new theory for Everglades tree islands

Posted Tue, 22 Mar 2011 16:55:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Human waste-tips some 5,000 years ago helped to build south Florida's tree-islands, new research being presented at today's American Geophysical Union's Chapman Conference shows. As the waste piled up, the ground became raised enough for trees to colonize - and then stabilize - these island wildlife sanctuaries in the Everglades' Shark River Slough.

From garbage tip to wildlife haven - new theory for Everglades tree islands

Genetic analysis ends 20 years of debate over whether the Amsterdam albatross is separate species

Genetic analysis ends 20 years of debate over whether the Amsterdam albatross is separate species

Posted Mon, 21 Mar 2011 20:24:00 GMT by Helen Roddis

Genetic analysis confirms the world's rarest albatross is a separate species. The Amsterdam albatross is classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. It is an extremely large albatross that breeds only on Amsterdam Island in the southern Indian Ocean, where its total population is made up of just 130 individuals. The Amsterdam albatross's breeding range is restricted further still, to a single area of the island known as the Plateau des Tourbieres.

Genetic analysis ends 20 years of debate over whether the Amsterdam albatross is separate species

Animals help increase diversity of plant life in forested areas of France

Animals help increase diversity of plant life in forested areas of France

Posted Mon, 21 Mar 2011 11:27:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Although large animals in French forests are responsible for a certain amount of damage, they also are effective in contributing to plant diversity. They discovered that one plant, the gypsy flower, was not found at the time of the original survey and only began to appear in 1981. It is now widespread, particularly in areas most frequented by large forest mammals.

Animals help increase diversity of plant life in forested areas of France

Not just a pretty face: adult Barbary macaques recognise photos of friends

Not just a pretty face: adult Barbary macaques recognise photos of friends

Posted Fri, 18 Mar 2011 15:16:00 GMT by Helen Roddis

According to new research, untrained Barbary macaques are able to differentiate between pictures of familiar and unfamiliar faces. Scientists discovered that the monkeys were able recognise photographs of group members, and spent more time studying pictures of animals that were not part of their social circle.

Not just a pretty face: adult Barbary macaques recognise photos of friends

On the move - 'endangered species should shift with climate'

On the move - 'endangered species should shift with climate'

Posted Fri, 18 Mar 2011 15:01:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Climate-endangered species should be moved to new compatible habitats, in order to prevent extinctions threatened by global warming. So says a conservationist from the University of York. As long as care is taken is selecting suitable new locations, such radical steps should help slow down rising species loss.

On the move - 'endangered species should shift with climate'

New population of the Endangered Andean cat discovered

New population of the Endangered Andean cat discovered

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 21:28:00 GMT by Helen Roddis

The Andean cat, an elusive species of feline has been discovered to inhabit a much bigger range than was previously imagined. A single photograph of two Andean cats in the foothills of Argentina convinced the WCS researchers and their team to extensively survey 31,000 square kilometres of Argentina's Mendoza and Neuquen provinces.

New population of the Endangered Andean cat discovered

Deep water thresher sharks come into the shallows for a wash and scrub-up

Deep water thresher sharks come into the shallows for a wash and scrub-up

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 16:40:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Pelagic thresher sharks are coming up from the deeps in the Philippines to be cleaned of ectoparasites. This is the first study of wild shark interactions with cleaner fish. The sharks will drown if they do not continuously circulate oxygenated water over their gills, so they make repeat circular passes over the discreet areas of the reef where the cleaner species hold court.

Deep water thresher sharks come into the shallows for a wash and scrub-up

Foo Fighters to play New Zealand earthquake benefit show

Foo Fighters to play New Zealand earthquake benefit show

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 15:57:01 GMT by Andy Tillett

Foo Fighters are playing a show to raise money for victims of the recent New Zealand earthquake. The 'Rope' rockers are heading to the Auckland Town hall in the nation's capital on March 22 to raise money for the Christchurch Earthquake Relief Fund. The earthquake killed nearly 200 people and wreaked devastation over the city, the second largest in New Zealand, on February 22.

Foo Fighters to play New Zealand earthquake benefit show

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

Horse Sense

Posted Mon, 13 Oct 2014 20:04:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We’re mad about Madagascar.

Posted Sat, 11 Oct 2014 09:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bad news for corals and divers.

Posted Tue, 07 Oct 2014 08:30:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Voyage to/from Ancient New Zealand

Posted Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:15:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Language evolved quickly.

Posted Thu, 25 Sep 2014 08:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Monkeys redden up for breeding.

Posted Wed, 24 Sep 2014 07:54:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Budgies negotiate gaps

Posted Sun, 21 Sep 2014 11:06:39 GMT by Dave Armstrong

It's a peach of a story

Posted Sat, 06 Sep 2014 23:20:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Posted Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:01:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Posted Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:44:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Whales don't eat gulls, so why?

Posted Tue, 02 Jul 2013 15:48:01 GMT by JW Dowey

Pigeon variations not always due to genetics

Posted Thu, 19 Jan 2012 17:00:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

For baboons it pays to be sociable

Posted Wed, 02 Nov 2011 22:11:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Singing Cousins

Posted Thu, 29 Sep 2011 10:38:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The strange case of cats and dingo dogs

Posted Mon, 29 Oct 2012 07:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

England's most-important natural refuges identified

Posted Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:26:00 GMT by David Hewitt

Eye in the Sky: Google Earth used to monitor animal behaviour

Posted Thu, 16 Jun 2011 13:07:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Tropical forests have been downed before!

Posted Sat, 18 Jan 2014 13:30:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Cuckoos mimic hawks

Posted Fri, 18 Oct 2013 12:44:30 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Japan's continuing history of seismic disasters

Posted Mon, 28 Mar 2011 21:16:00 GMT by Michael Evans