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Trees killed by Pine Beetles create more dangerous fires

Trees killed by Pine Beetles create more dangerous fires

Posted Fri, 06 May 2011 14:55:00 GMT by Melanie J. Martin

Fire ignites and spreads more easily in forests devastated by pine beetles, making new fire management plans crucial. In areas where many trees have been killed by pine beetle infestations, forest fires can spread more quickly, new research says. The dead trees are much drier than live wood, as are the red needles. The way fire behaves in areas struck by pine beetles, such as much of British Columbia and Montana, is changing dramatically in a short time.

Trees killed by Pine Beetles create more dangerous fires

Increase in whale strandings causes concern

Increase in whale strandings causes concern

Posted Fri, 06 May 2011 08:26:00 GMT by Melanie J. Martin

Whale and dolphin strandings and deaths may be on the rise due to sonar. In the past few years, whale strandings have risen, says a spokesperson for the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) in a May 4 article on ABC News. The DEC isn't sure why whales are stranding more frequently, he says, but it plans to investigate the causes.

Increase in whale strandings causes concern

Rodent eradication declared a success in South Georgia

Rodent eradication declared a success in South Georgia

Posted Thu, 05 May 2011 17:20:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

50 tonnes of rodenticide spread by helicopter to remove invasive species. South Georgia has been colonised by invasive rodent species. These introduced rodents feed on the eggs and young of ground-nesting native birds, which can offer no resistance. Every year thousands, perhaps millions, of young birds are eaten alive by rats.

Rodent eradication declared a success in South Georgia

Forearms point to Tasmanian tiger as a solitary hunter

Forearms point to Tasmanian tiger as a solitary hunter

Posted Tue, 03 May 2011 23:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

The Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, really was more like a solitary stalking tiger than a wolf, says a study into the bones of this extinct marsupial in the latest Biology Letters. That means it wasn't a direct competitor with the introduced dingo - raising questions about exactly how this top predator met its untimely demise in mainland Australia.

Forearms point to Tasmanian tiger as a solitary hunter

Look out for the little guys - smaller fish more vulnerable than thought

Look out for the little guys - smaller fish more vulnerable than thought

Posted Mon, 02 May 2011 19:00:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Small fry may be at greater risk from population plunges than the big predatory fish, says a study out today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That flips the convention that has fish species at the top of the food pyramid as most vulnerable to pollution and overfishing pressures; anchovies and sardines need looking after too.

Look out for the little guys - smaller fish more vulnerable than thought

Curious or cowardly - how greenfinches personality shines through

Curious or cowardly - how greenfinches personality shines through

Posted Thu, 28 Apr 2011 18:38:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

An experimental study on greenfinch personality has shown that being brave or curious has real biochemical consequences, when it comes to defending against dangerous oxidants. Braver and bolder finches show better antioxidant defenses than more timid and less adventurous birds, says the study in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

Curious or cowardly - how greenfinches personality shines through

Deep ocean larvae hitch ride on powerful eddies

Deep ocean larvae hitch ride on powerful eddies

Posted Thu, 28 Apr 2011 18:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Oceanic eddies 300-miles wide don't just stretch across the surface of the ocean - they reach down to its depths, helping to connect isolated areas of the mid-oceanic ridges, and even providing 'lifts' to their inhabitants. So claims a new paper in Science which shows that these rotating currents help bring the 'seasons' of the surface to the darkest corners of the oceans.

Deep ocean larvae hitch ride on powerful eddies

Humpback whales in super-aggregation in Antarctica

Humpback whales in super-aggregation in Antarctica

Posted Wed, 27 Apr 2011 21:10:00 GMT by Louise Murray

In a wildlife spectacle, a massive aggregation of over 300 humpback whales followed the biggest swarm of Antarctic krill seen in twenty years into bays in the Western Antarctic peninsula. The humpbacks were gorging on swarms of the tiny shrimp-like crustaceans. Almost all life in the Southern Ocean is ultimately dependent on the protein-rich crustaceans, from seabirds, seals and penguins, to the filter feeding whales.

Humpback whales in super-aggregation in Antarctica

Massive public evolutionary study sights ¾ million brightly colored snails

Massive public evolutionary study sights ¾ million brightly colored snails

Posted Wed, 27 Apr 2011 21:05:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

In one of the biggest mass-participation studies of its kind, 6,000 members of the public across Europe have helped document the evolutionary track of banded snails over the last fifty years. The Evolution Megalab project, published today in PloS One, shows that warmer temperatures are influencing snails in some areas – and threw up some interesting surprises.

Massive public evolutionary study sights ¾ million brightly colored snails

Wild parakeets face a UK cull

Wild parakeets face a UK cull

Posted Wed, 27 Apr 2011 10:46:00 GMT by Laura Brown

The government announces measures to kill the non-native species that is becoming a pest. The UK government is to remove a species of parakeet from the British countryside because it poses a threat to crops, electricity grids and native birds.

Wild parakeets face a UK cull

Report Calls For Improved Earthquake Resilience in USA

Report Calls For Improved Earthquake Resilience in USA

Posted Mon, 25 Apr 2011 15:46:01 GMT by Mike Campbell

The continental USA sits on the North American Plate which shares near coastal boundaries with the Caribbean and Pacific Plates and two smaller tectonic plates. Earthquakes are a geological fact of life in America, but the nation has escaped a major earthquake for more than 100 years and this, according to a report by the National Research Council (NRC) has led to a false sense of security in Americans. America has suffered moderate to strong earthquakes in recent decades, but these have struck in sparsely populated regions.

Report Calls For Improved Earthquake Resilience in USA

Toxic chemicals found in peregrine falcon eggs

Toxic chemicals found in peregrine falcon eggs

Posted Fri, 22 Apr 2011 14:23:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

Scientists have discovered flame retardant chemicals in peregrine falcon eggs. The study looked at eggs that had failed to hatch in falcon nests around Spain and Canada, including the Great Lakes Region. It was discovered that the levels of chemical compounds were higher in the eggs of birds living in coastal environments.

Toxic chemicals found in peregrine falcon eggs

'Remixes' top humpback whale song charts

'Remixes' top humpback whale song charts

Posted Thu, 14 Apr 2011 16:01:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Humpback whale song - Whales singing in the vast expanses of the oceans introduce new song elements into their repertoire each year, creating new 'remixes'. And the most popular tunes quickly ripple across the oceans in a massive cultural interchange that has no known parallels outside of homo sapiens. So say scientists studying Pacific humpback whales.

'Remixes' top humpback whale song charts

Tigers to return to Central Asia

Tigers to return to Central Asia

Posted Thu, 14 Apr 2011 13:04:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Kazakhstan government announces programme to reintroduce tigers. In an unexpected announcement, WWF-Russia and the Kazakhstan government have initiated a programme to reintroduce tigers to Central Asia. The Kazakhstan government has taken steps to deal with poaching and habitat loss, the two biggest threats to the tiger reintroduction programme.

Tigers to return to Central Asia

There's a buzz in their air in London as urban beekeeping really takes off

There's a buzz in their air in London as urban beekeeping really takes off

Posted Thu, 14 Apr 2011 12:44:00 GMT by David Hewitt

The Earth Times caught up with one of London's top bee experts to discover what's prompting growing numbers of city-dwellers to set up hives in their own back yards. From New York to Paris and all points in between, city-dwellers are embracing the simple pleasures of beekeeping in their thousands.

There's a buzz in their air in London as urban beekeeping really takes off

Gulf Wildlife and Wetlands Vulnerable, says NWF

Gulf Wildlife and Wetlands Vulnerable, says NWF

Posted Thu, 14 Apr 2011 10:51:00 GMT by Kirsten E. Silven

With the one-year anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon Gulf oil spill disaster looming in the near future, the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) has released a report written by senior scientist Dr. Doug Inkley that details the current state of both the wildlife and the wetlands in the region. Although the report's findings indicate that some species have begun to show signs of recovery, many others are still in peril and will require the help of legislators, conservation groups, scientists and regulatory bodies in order to survive.

Gulf Wildlife and Wetlands Vulnerable, says NWF

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Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Posted Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:44:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Jackdaws lose their winning ways

Posted Wed, 06 Aug 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Diet in mammals is complex

Posted Wed, 09 Jul 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Forest loss accelerates

Posted Mon, 30 Jun 2014 08:58:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

How are butterflies and moths related?

Posted Wed, 25 Jun 2014 07:14:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Posted Wed, 18 Jun 2014 07:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bear with us

Posted Tue, 10 Jun 2014 06:50:28 GMT by JW Dowey

Gannets prove to be discard specialists

Posted Wed, 04 Jun 2014 11:32:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Desert memories and route guidance - for ants

Posted Wed, 28 May 2014 12:08:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The whales don't mix between ocean basins

Posted Wed, 21 May 2014 00:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The soaring habits of Golden Eagles

Posted Tue, 15 May 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Smart, social bats use ring-tone cues

Posted Wed, 23 Oct 2013 08:00:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Tail of a rat who won't chew but he's a new species and new genus

Posted Tue, 21 Aug 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Invasions from 'above' worse than those from 'below'

Posted Wed, 28 Sep 2011 06:08:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Jelly and Sea Tomatoes?

Posted Sat, 26 Jan 2013 11:57:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Largest quake of its kind ever recorded

Posted Wed, 26 Sep 2012 17:00:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Why biodiversity really does matter

Posted Sun, 06 Mar 2011 12:50:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Bitterling battle between parasite and host

Posted Wed, 15 Feb 2012 00:02:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Sea lice from farmed salmon infesting wild salmon in British Columbia

Posted Tue, 16 Nov 2010 17:49:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

The bigger the invader, the better

Posted Wed, 25 Sep 2013 04:09:02 GMT by JW Dowey