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Penguins smell good - who knew?

Penguins smell good - who knew?

Posted Thu, 22 Sep 2011 20:34:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

New research shows for the first time that penguins use scent to tell one another apart and avoid interbreeding. Scientists at the University of Chicago and the Chicago Zoological Society report that penguins use a highly-developed sense of smell to identify their kin, thus avoiding interbreeding with relatives.

Penguins smell good - who knew?

Oldest North American Beaver Remains Found in the Beaver State

Oldest North American Beaver Remains Found in the Beaver State

Posted Mon, 19 Sep 2011 17:23:01 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Paleontologists working in northern Oregon's Rattlesnake Formation have identified fossilized beaver teeth believed to be about 7 million years old, which is at least 2 million years older than any previously discovered beaver remains. The finding sheds new light on our understanding of when modern beavers first came to North America and diverged from the Eurasian beaver.

Oldest North American Beaver Remains Found in the Beaver State

Visiting mosquitoes threaten Galapagos with deadly virus

Visiting mosquitoes threaten Galapagos with deadly virus

Posted Sat, 17 Sep 2011 16:09:27 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Scientists are worried that a disease that has caused damage to wildlife in North and South America could travel to the Galapagos Islands via mosquitoes hitching a ride with visiting boats and planes.

Visiting mosquitoes threaten Galapagos with deadly virus

Why slow-and-steady jellyfish beat fish in oceanic contest

Why slow-and-steady jellyfish beat fish in oceanic contest

Posted Thu, 15 Sep 2011 18:00:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

A new paper in Science has gone a long way to clearing-up why primitive jelly-fish are often able to out-compete hard-pressed fish. The inclusion of their low-energy use into the modeling equations used by ecologists, shows that jellyfish and fish are on more of an equal footing than previously believed - and so jellyfish may carry on winning-out whilst over-fishing continues.

Why slow-and-steady jellyfish beat fish in oceanic contest

Mountain butterflies provide rare glimpse of hybrid speciation

Mountain butterflies provide rare glimpse of hybrid speciation

Posted Wed, 14 Sep 2011 14:21:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Observant scientists have discovered a rare example of animal hybrid speciation, in the forests of the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States. The creature in question, the Appalachian tiger swallowtail butterfly (Papilio appalachiensis), is the genetically unique result of the union of two related butterflies.

Mountain butterflies provide rare glimpse of hybrid speciation

In the crowded canopy, fruit bats get flexible with sonar

In the crowded canopy, fruit bats get flexible with sonar

Posted Tue, 13 Sep 2011 21:01:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Fruit bats have the ability to vary the scope of their sonar probings, to match up with the complexity of the feeding ground they are flying through, according to scientists. This flexible adaptation of the senses could be a first, say the research team, who are publishing their paper on the PLoS ONE website today.

In the crowded canopy, fruit bats get flexible with sonar

The world's dying oceans

The world's dying oceans

Posted Tue, 13 Sep 2011 08:47:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

A United Nations top scientist believes that coral reefs will potentially be the first ecosystem that human activity effectively destroys. A new book released this week in the United States, Professor Peter Sale, who leads the United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health, states his concern that the world's coral reef ecosystems are likely to disappear this century.

The world's dying oceans

Natural disasters pose threat to coral reefs

Natural disasters pose threat to coral reefs

Posted Mon, 12 Sep 2011 18:12:00 GMT by Melanie J. Martin

Earthquakes launched half of the Belizean Barrier Reef into deeper waters. Studying the possible effects of natural disasters must play a role in protecting ecosystems, researchers assert. The Belizean Barrier Reef is the second largest reef ecosystem in the world, second only to Australia's Great Barrier Reef.

Natural disasters pose threat to coral reefs

Rhino horn use slammed by Chinese traditional medicinal practitioners

Rhino horn use slammed by Chinese traditional medicinal practitioners

Posted Mon, 12 Sep 2011 16:31:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Another important body in the Chinese medicinal community has come out strongly against the use of rhino horn in traditional remedies. The Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine has put out a statement condemning the practice, which may go a long way to shifting attitudes, and reducing demand for the horns of these endangered animals.

Rhino horn use slammed by Chinese traditional medicinal practitioners

Fluttering tail-feathers strike winning note for male hummingbirds

Fluttering tail-feathers strike winning note for male hummingbirds

Posted Thu, 08 Sep 2011 18:01:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Intriguing research published in Science today has uncovered the details of the fluttering sound-scaping used by male hummingbirds, as part of the dramatic diving displays, given to impress watching females. The tones produced by feather-fanning are more complex than first thought, and are distinct for each humming bird species, say the researchers.

Fluttering tail-feathers strike winning note for male hummingbirds

New flood warnings for New York as Tropical Storm crosses northeast

New flood warnings for New York as Tropical Storm crosses northeast

Posted Wed, 07 Sep 2011 15:46:00 GMT by Laura Brown

Tropical Storm Lee is likely to cause heavy rain and flooding in areas still cleaning up after Hurricane Irene. Flood warnings have been issued for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and upstate New York. The National Weather Service has issued a flooding notice to Catskills and Schoharie Creek as the storm moves northeast out of Pennsylvania.

New flood warnings for New York as Tropical Storm crosses northeast

Stranded calf whale freed after 8 hour battle

Stranded calf whale freed after 8 hour battle

Posted Wed, 07 Sep 2011 09:45:10 GMT by Laura Brown

Calf whale swims to freedom after becoming beached in River Humber. A calf whale who became stranded off the English coast after becoming separated from its mother has been freed after an 8 hour rescue effort by emergency services.

Stranded calf whale freed after 8 hour battle

500 Texas homes destroyed by wildfires

500 Texas homes destroyed by wildfires

Posted Tue, 06 Sep 2011 09:14:00 GMT by Laura Brown

Officials continue efforts to control blazes covering 25,000 acres in drought conditions. Wildfires have destroyed almost 500 homes in Texas, as strong winds hamper the ability of firefighters to control the blaze.

500 Texas homes destroyed by wildfires

Hurricane Katia becomes category 4 storm

Hurricane Katia becomes category 4 storm

Posted Tue, 06 Sep 2011 08:56:56 GMT by Laura Brown

Latest storm off US coast gathers pace. Hurricane Katia, currently around 450 miles south of Bermuda is now capable of reaching winds up to 135 mph according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm has moved over warmer water, allowing it to pick up speed. However analysts believe that Hurricane Katia is unlikely to hit land over the coming days in the US.

Hurricane Katia becomes category 4 storm

Fungus from California suspected of killing cypress trees worldwide

Fungus from California suspected of killing cypress trees worldwide

Posted Sat, 03 Sep 2011 13:11:00 GMT by Gracie Valena

Genetic analysis has determined a fungus that has been causing cypress canker disease and killing trees in six out of the world's seven continents originated from California. The fungus, Seiridium cardinale, enters a tree through cracks in the bark. Once inside, it releases toxins that interfere with the flow of water, sap and nutrients, making the tree sick and eventually killing it.

Fungus from California suspected of killing cypress trees worldwide

The jumping fish with a tale of the earliest land creatures

The jumping fish with a tale of the earliest land creatures

Posted Wed, 31 Aug 2011 15:47:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

An extraordinary jumping, land-living fish could tell us a lot about how life first moved from sea to land according to the first detailed study of its life. The study, study published in the journal Ethology and led by Dr Terry Ord, of the UNSW Evolution and Ecology Research Centre is the first detailed examination of the extraordinary life of the Pacific leaping blenny.

The jumping fish with a tale of the earliest land creatures

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

Auks transform Arctic ecosystems.

Posted Wed, 15 Feb 2017 10:20:00 GMT by JW. Dowey

Tiger, leopard and dhole share resources in India

Posted Wed, 08 Feb 2017 10:28:00 GMT by JW. Dowey

Intriguing leadership roles in orcas linked to evolution, even in humans

Posted Thu, 12 Jan 2017 09:40:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Social interaction in vervets/its relevance to humans.

Posted Wed, 23 Nov 2016 10:35:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Tremendous cognition in tool-making, etc., in a cockatoo.

Posted Wed, 16 Nov 2016 14:30:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Whale cultures rule in Galápagos.

Posted Wed, 19 Oct 2016 11:30:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Sperm speed gene improves reproduction

Posted Tue, 18 Oct 2016 13:43:26 GMT by Paul Robinson

Common dolphins adapt to bay life.

Posted Wed, 28 Sep 2016 09:50:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Evolution of placental lizards gave us advanced skinks,

Posted Tue, 23 Aug 2016 23:00:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Superorganism extraordinaire-a full expose on army ants.

Posted Mon, 08 Aug 2016 14:40:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Jumping like a fish out of water

Posted Thu, 06 Oct 2011 17:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bottlenose dolphins whistle hello

Posted Wed, 29 Feb 2012 00:16:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Viral infections in native pollinators spell disaster for honey bees

Posted Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:40:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Eye in the Sky: Google Earth used to monitor animal behaviour

Posted Thu, 16 Jun 2011 13:07:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Monkeys' and apes' cultural learning

Posted Wed, 12 Nov 2014 04:00:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Orangutan engineer gains degree

Posted Wed, 18 Apr 2012 23:23:24 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Oysters in danger of extinction

Posted Mon, 14 Feb 2011 15:01:01 GMT by Astrid Madsen

The strange case of cats and dingo dogs

Posted Mon, 29 Oct 2012 07:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Colobus chorus

Posted Tue, 29 Nov 2011 18:12:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Horses look back

Posted Wed, 23 Nov 2011 16:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong