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Our Rivers campaign launches survey to identify best UK rivers for wildlife

Our Rivers campaign launches survey to identify best UK rivers for wildlife

Posted Tue, 12 Jul 2011 12:33:01 GMT by John Dean

A survey has been launched to identify the best rivers in the UK for wildlife, with support coming from a wide range of environmentalists including television broadcaster Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. The Our Rivers campaign, run by WWF, the RSPB, the Angling Trust and the Salmon & Trout Association, aims to assess the damage done to wildlife by the poor state of many rivers.

Our Rivers campaign launches survey to identify best UK rivers for wildlife

New research suggests dinosaurs were warm blooded and active

New research suggests dinosaurs were warm blooded and active

Posted Tue, 12 Jul 2011 11:09:01 GMT by Julian Jackson

Tiny holes in bones show creatures were not sluggish as often thought. New Research at Australia's Adelaide University suggests that contrary to some beliefs, dinosaurs were active and even fast-moving creatures, not cold-blooded and sluggish.

New research suggests dinosaurs were warm blooded and active

Underwater volcanoes found under the Southern Ocean

Underwater volcanoes found under the Southern Ocean

Posted Mon, 11 Jul 2011 22:17:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Active volcanoes discovered deep under cold waters. Previously unknown volcanoes have been discovered under the Southern Ocean around the remote South Sandwich Islands. Scientists from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) used sea-floor mapping technology to find 12 underwater volcanoes, some up to 3 kilometres high.

Underwater volcanoes found under the Southern Ocean

Plants bloom earlier in Canada

Plants bloom earlier in Canada

Posted Thu, 07 Jul 2011 17:08:00 GMT by Gracie Valena

Researchers report that flowers are blooming up to two weeks earlier than they did 70 years ago in Alberta because of the weather has become substantially warmer, and this may put the species at risk. Researchers are wary that it may lead to problems for the plant species involved if they are exposed to late-spring frosts.

Plants bloom earlier in Canada

Dangerous liaisons - how Ireland's brown bears shaped polar bear evolution

Dangerous liaisons - how Ireland's brown bears shaped polar bear evolution

Posted Thu, 07 Jul 2011 16:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Modern polar bear can trace their family tree back to brown bears from Britain and Ireland, says a team publishing in Current Biology today. Their extensive work on mitochondrial DNA shows that polar and brown bears have often 'gotten intimate' in the past - and such liaisons may be critical for the future survival of polar bars.

Dangerous liaisons - how Ireland's brown bears shaped polar bear evolution

Hotspots driving tectonic plate movement

Hotspots driving tectonic plate movement

Posted Wed, 06 Jul 2011 22:15:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

New research published in Nature shows that plumes of hot magma are responsible for the movement of whole continents. This movement is driven by the heat of the Earth's core, causing the viscous substance beneath the Earth's crust to flow and move the plates above, like pieces of toast floating in a massive bowl of hot beans.

Hotspots driving tectonic plate movement

Gray whales cruised through Ice Age on krill and herring

Gray whales cruised through Ice Age on krill and herring

Posted Wed, 06 Jul 2011 21:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

California gray whales may be able to quadruple their numbers to nearer 100,000, say paleontologists looking at how these encrusted denizens of the Pacific survived the last Ice Age. The paper, appearing online in today's edition of PloS ONE, shows that adaptable gray whales can shift their feeding to krill and herring; they could even thrive with rising sea-levels, the paper's authors suggest.

Gray whales cruised through Ice Age on krill and herring

Australian volcanoes overdue an eruption warn scientists

Australian volcanoes overdue an eruption warn scientists

Posted Wed, 06 Jul 2011 20:02:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

By using the latest dating techniques Australian scientists believe that parts of the country are at risk from overdue volcano eruptions and are calling for emergency plans to be put in place. There are concerns that no plans are in place to deal with eruptions or seismic activity.

Australian volcanoes overdue an eruption warn scientists

Minuscule water boatman boasts loudest shout of them all

Minuscule water boatman boasts loudest shout of them all

Posted Fri, 01 Jul 2011 15:57:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

A minute species of water boatman has been shown to be able to 'turn up the volume to 11', and so out-shout all other animals in the noise-making department, according to a study being presented the Society for Experimental Biology annual conference. At 99 decibels, the mating call of Micronecta scholtzi blasts out louder than elephant or whale, when body weight is taken into consideration.

Minuscule water boatman boasts loudest shout of them all

How urchins see when they have no eyes

How urchins see when they have no eyes

Posted Fri, 01 Jul 2011 15:25:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Sea urchins don't have eyes, yet they react to light. How? Researchers from Sweden argue that the whole creature is studded with light sensors making it one giant seeing eye. So, while they have no eye as such, the urchins have many many light receptors, found on the end of the feet that cover their entire body.

How urchins see when they have no eyes

Call in the army to protect Great Lakes from carp invasion says study

Call in the army to protect Great Lakes from carp invasion says study

Posted Fri, 01 Jul 2011 14:16:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Academics don't often call for less study, but experts on the Great Lakes in North America warn that unless radical action is taken quickly, Asian carp will cause terrible damage to native species and fishery economies. The study calls for action and even calling in the army in the shape of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to help separate the lakes from the carp's Mississippi home.

Call in the army to protect Great Lakes from carp invasion says study

Tarantula in the scanner unveils its double-beating heart

Tarantula in the scanner unveils its double-beating heart

Posted Fri, 01 Jul 2011 00:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

An innovative use of MRI scanners and tarantulas has revealed intriguing new information about a spider's heart - it may show a double-beat, similar to that felt by humans. The research, being presented at this week's annual conference of the Society for Experimental Biology, in Glasgow, also holds out the possibility of investigating useful properties in spider venom, and the evolution of the brain.

Tarantula in the scanner unveils its double-beating heart

DNA tests unravel a tricky tortoise mystery

DNA tests unravel a tricky tortoise mystery

Posted Wed, 29 Jun 2011 16:11:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Just how many species of desert tortoises are there? For 150 years since the species' discovery, it was believed that the desert tortoise is one species. However, evidence has been mounting that desert tortoises should in fact be two separate species.

DNA tests unravel a tricky tortoise mystery

Right time for whales to return to New Zealand's calving grounds

Right time for whales to return to New Zealand's calving grounds

Posted Mon, 27 Jun 2011 12:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

The playful antics of the gentle-but-gigantic right whales may be about to return to New Zealand, after an absence of 50 years - according to a new study published in Marine Ecology Progress Series. These formerly teeming calving grounds are being rediscovered by intrepid pioneers from near the Antarctic - and this may herald a return to the stunning yearly spectacle, last seen 100 years ago, before the whalers laid waste to these graceful giants.

Right time for whales to return to New Zealand's calving grounds

Bird's eye view has four dimensions of color

Bird's eye view has four dimensions of color

Posted Thu, 23 Jun 2011 12:07:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

The hidden world of the feathered color-spectrum has been mapped out in detail, in a new study of color - as seen from the bird's point of view - just published in Behavioral Ecology, out today. It seems for all their dazzle to our eyes, there is even more possibility for bird's evolutionary display to explore – as two-thirds of possible colors have yet to be painted on their plumage.

Bird's eye view has four dimensions of color

Major Pacific study reveals top predators homing in on ocean's sweet-spots

Major Pacific study reveals top predators homing in on ocean's sweet-spots

Posted Wed, 22 Jun 2011 17:11:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

After a decade of surveying that has pooled marine experts from institutions from across the globe, the first results of TOPP - a critical part of the Census of Marine Life – are published in Nature today. They show that the Pacific Ocean's top predators move across an ever-changing oceanic landscape, in order to enjoy shifting biological feasts, that move with the the currents and the seasons.

Major Pacific study reveals top predators homing in on ocean's sweet-spots

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

Jackdaws lose their winning ways

Posted Wed, 06 Aug 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Diet in mammals is complex

Posted Wed, 09 Jul 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Forest loss accelerates

Posted Mon, 30 Jun 2014 08:58:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

How are butterflies and moths related?

Posted Wed, 25 Jun 2014 07:14:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Posted Wed, 18 Jun 2014 07:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bear with us

Posted Tue, 10 Jun 2014 06:50:28 GMT by JW Dowey

Gannets prove to be discard specialists

Posted Wed, 04 Jun 2014 11:32:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Desert memories and route guidance - for ants

Posted Wed, 28 May 2014 12:08:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The whales don't mix between ocean basins

Posted Wed, 21 May 2014 00:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Tiny Australian crayfish is brand new species

Posted Wed, 09 Apr 2014 07:55:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Warming throws flowers off schedule threatening birds and bees

Posted Mon, 20 Jun 2011 11:00:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Taking the Plan Bee roads

Posted Tue, 12 Apr 2011 13:30:01 GMT by John Dean

Cockroach copycat sex chemical could save rare woodpeckers

Posted Tue, 20 Dec 2011 14:09:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Jelly and Sea Tomatoes?

Posted Sat, 26 Jan 2013 11:57:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The jumping fish with a tale of the earliest land creatures

Posted Wed, 31 Aug 2011 15:47:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

New Caledonian crows and their tools

Posted Sat, 17 Dec 2011 09:18:29 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Endangered Great hammerhead sharks tracked into the north Atlantic

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 19:09:00 GMT by Louise Murray

New population of the Endangered Andean cat discovered

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 21:28:00 GMT by Helen Roddis

Marine reserve's dramatic recovery shocks scientists

Posted Sun, 14 Aug 2011 21:44:01 GMT by Melanie J. Martin

The whales are calling you

Posted Tue, 29 Nov 2011 19:44:00 GMT by Dave Collier