Earth Times Logo
RSS Feed Google+ Facebook Twitter Linked In Pinterest


Nature News

A fishy tale for the origins of some MCS Chilean sea bass

A fishy tale for the origins of some MCS Chilean sea bass

Posted Mon, 22 Aug 2011 16:02:57 GMT by Martin Leggett

Not all MCS-labeled fish turn out to be true to their sticker, according to a new study on the make-up of the Chilean sea bass, commonly found in US grocery stores. Many of the fish labeled as sustainably-sourced in fact comes from different South American fisheries, or even from oceans on the other side the world, say the authors of the work published in Current Biology.

A fishy tale for the origins of some MCS Chilean sea bass

Wildlife moving faster as the heat piles on

Wildlife moving faster as the heat piles on

Posted Thu, 18 Aug 2011 18:01:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

A new study in Science shows that the natural world moving three times faster to the poles, away from the tropics, than expected. Climate change is blamed, say the researchers, and not all species can keep up at that rate.

Wildlife moving faster as the heat piles on

Are zoos a force for good or just plain cruel?

Are zoos a force for good or just plain cruel?

Posted Thu, 18 Aug 2011 12:33:00 GMT by David Hewitt

In a new series of features, the Earth Times asks two leading experts to give their views on some of the hottest green topics of the 21st century. This week, we ask: Are zoos a force for good, or just an out-dated mode of animal cruelty? Tackling the issue head-on are Liz Tyson and Rosalind Smith.

Are zoos a force for good or just plain cruel?

Soft corals crucial to reef building

Soft corals crucial to reef building

Posted Tue, 16 Aug 2011 20:32:54 GMT by Melanie J. Martin

Previously believed to be mere decorative carpets, soft corals play a vital role in reef ecosystems, scientists find. Previously, scientists believed soft corals simply disintegrated, their sclerites scattering to the sea floor.

Soft corals crucial to reef building

Marine reserve's dramatic recovery shocks scientists

Marine reserve's dramatic recovery shocks scientists

Posted Sun, 14 Aug 2011 21:44:01 GMT by Melanie J. Martin

A local community's dedication led marine reserve Cabo Pulmo to the most dramatic fish recovery scientists have ever seen. Ten years ago, the marine reserve Cabo Pulmo in the Gulf of California struggled for survival but the depleted ecosystem has become a biodiversity hotspot in less than 10 years.

Marine reserve's dramatic recovery shocks scientists

Japanese tsunami broke chunks off Antarctica's ice sheet

Japanese tsunami broke chunks off Antarctica's ice sheet

Posted Thu, 11 Aug 2011 19:29:00 GMT by Kieran Ball

Photographic evidence has emerged that suggest the Japanese earthquake and subsequent Tohoku Tsunami caused 50 square miles of ice to break off Antarctica. Images from the European Space Agency show that icebergs, some larger than Manhattan island, broke away from Antarctica just a few days after the quake.

Japanese tsunami broke chunks off Antarctica's ice sheet

Tackling invasive species together

Tackling invasive species together

Posted Sun, 07 Aug 2011 08:38:00 GMT by Jessica Allan

The UK Environment Agency has released a list of the top 10 most threatening invasive species and there are fears that many UK rivers may fail to meet European ecological status targets as a result of the impacts of these species on ecosystems.

Tackling invasive species together

Could flirting make males age faster?

Could flirting make males age faster?

Posted Fri, 05 Aug 2011 12:41:00 GMT by Kieran Ball

Scientists looking at the sex lives of birds have concluded that attracting members of the opposite sex through mating rituals could cause males to age faster. The scientists put forward the theory that because the birds lived in a habitat with many predators, they evolved a mechanism by which they put more energy into mating in early life - a form of biological trade-off that resulted in premature aging.

Could flirting make males age faster?

Track the prey, miss the whale

Track the prey, miss the whale

Posted Tue, 02 Aug 2011 23:00:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

A novel way to avoid the tragedy of boats and right whales colliding is being suggested by new research into the feeding habits of the North Atlantic right whales - by tracking their prey. These endangered whales may number as few as four hundred, and inadvertent ship strikes account for worryingly high number of deaths each year.

Track the prey, miss the whale

The siren call of the vine - how plants lure bats in for supper

The siren call of the vine - how plants lure bats in for supper

Posted Thu, 28 Jul 2011 18:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Plants can use more than scent and flowers to attract pollinators - an upcoming paper in Science describes how a Cuban vine uses the sound reflected off a dish-shaped leaf to pull in echo-sounding bats. Experiments show the bats are twice as likely to find nectar-laden flowers adorned with the 'echo-beacon', giving the dispersed vine more chance of a successful pollination.

The siren call of the vine - how plants lure bats in for supper

Fight to battle amphibian fungus

Fight to battle amphibian fungus

Posted Thu, 28 Jul 2011 11:58:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Chytridiomycosis, a fungal infection which has caused 200 amphibian species to disappear is coming under renewed attack from scientists looking at combining previously used methods to tackle it.

Fight to battle amphibian fungus

Olive orchards a threat to Mediterranean soil

Olive orchards a threat to Mediterranean soil

Posted Mon, 25 Jul 2011 10:18:46 GMT by Mario Balzan

Researchers in Spain have measured and modelled the soil erosion rates in olive groves starting from 1752. Through their model they managed to reproduce patterns in time for soil erosion rates. Their results suggest that agronomical practices in olive orchards considerably increase erosion rates, though this does not appear to reduce yield loss.

Olive orchards a threat to Mediterranean soil

The road to 'pollination heaven' is narrow - not broad

The road to 'pollination heaven' is narrow - not broad

Posted Thu, 21 Jul 2011 16:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

A paper out in today's Current Biology has described how the path lined with gold - rich in natural resources - can distract animals from completing their journeys between fragments of endangered habitat. Sometimes it is better to lay paths narrow and rocky, to encourage pollinators, such as hoverflies, to keep moving between stranded natural habitats.

The road to 'pollination heaven' is narrow - not broad

Rare northern white-cheeked crested gibbons discovered in Vietnam

Rare northern white-cheeked crested gibbons discovered in Vietnam

Posted Mon, 18 Jul 2011 21:11:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Exciting find of northern white-cheeked gibbons in southeast Asia. Across the hoots, rustles and chirrups sounding through Vietnam's remote Pu Mat National Park, a dawn chorus can be heard. One haunting sound represents a new hope for a critically endangered primate, the northern white-cheeked crested gibbon.

Rare northern white-cheeked crested gibbons discovered in Vietnam

Snow Leopard spotted in Afghanistan

Snow Leopard spotted in Afghanistan

Posted Thu, 14 Jul 2011 12:01:23 GMT by Kieran Ball

The Wildlife Conservation Society takes steps to protect a newly discovered population of snow leopards in Afghanistan. Snow leopards are doing well in a wild corner of war-torn Afghanistan according to the Wildlife Conservation Society published in the Journal of Environmental Studies.

Snow Leopard spotted in Afghanistan

Our Rivers campaign launches survey to identify best UK rivers for wildlife

Our Rivers campaign launches survey to identify best UK rivers for wildlife

Posted Tue, 12 Jul 2011 12:33:01 GMT by John Dean

A survey has been launched to identify the best rivers in the UK for wildlife, with support coming from a wide range of environmentalists including television broadcaster Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. The Our Rivers campaign, run by WWF, the RSPB, the Angling Trust and the Salmon & Trout Association, aims to assess the damage done to wildlife by the poor state of many rivers.

Our Rivers campaign launches survey to identify best UK rivers for wildlife

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

Diet in mammals is complex

Posted Wed, 09 Jul 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Forest loss accelerates

Posted Mon, 30 Jun 2014 08:58:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

How are butterflies and moths related?

Posted Wed, 25 Jun 2014 07:14:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Posted Wed, 18 Jun 2014 07:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bear with us

Posted Tue, 10 Jun 2014 06:50:28 GMT by JW Dowey

Gannets prove to be discard specialists

Posted Wed, 04 Jun 2014 11:32:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Desert memories and route guidance - for ants

Posted Wed, 28 May 2014 12:08:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The whales don't mix between ocean basins

Posted Wed, 21 May 2014 00:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Tiny Australian crayfish is brand new species

Posted Wed, 09 Apr 2014 07:55:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Visual effects created by bower birds

Posted Wed, 02 Apr 2014 08:51:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bat predation is affected by odour

Posted Thu, 02 May 2013 11:20:43 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Rare Hihi shows us style is down to diet!

Posted Wed, 13 Feb 2013 01:02:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Loggerhead turtle migration mystery solved

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 09:35:00 GMT by Louise Murray

The bumblebee gecko from Papua New Guinea - Nactus kunan

Posted Thu, 19 Apr 2012 14:43:43 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Surprise in bee reproduction

Posted Wed, 25 Sep 2013 04:17:13 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Coral Reefs in Crisis

Posted Wed, 23 Feb 2011 21:24:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Super Efficient Feeding Habits of Blue Whales

Posted Tue, 04 Jan 2011 09:56:54 GMT by Michael Evans

Chick attacks highlighted in study on the Nazca booby

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2011 07:26:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Eye in the sky watching Arctic blooms

Posted Mon, 07 Mar 2011 16:44:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

It is important to get a head

Posted Wed, 21 Dec 2011 21:51:42 GMT by Dave Armstrong