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Flatworm Sexuality

Flatworm Sexuality

Posted Mon, 17 Oct 2011 21:57:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The Turbellarian flatworms are cute, minute slug-like metazoans that are so primitive, they haven’t got a body space (or coelom) like the rest of the animal nation. We know that some flatworms, such as Dugesia, have at least three races with different reproductive modes: asexual race, sexual race, and physiological race.

Flatworm Sexuality

Piranha Pop

Piranha Pop

Posted Thu, 13 Oct 2011 22:27:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Messrs Millot, Vandewalle and Parmentier took some piranhas to Liege and lost half of a finger. In the process, though, they managed to record the Red Belly sound. The red-bellied piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri has a good bark when it is picked up from the water, as do many of its kind.

Piranha Pop

Bringing up (T. rex) Baby

Bringing up (T. rex) Baby

Posted Thu, 13 Oct 2011 16:18:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Five brave researchers have completed a computer analysis of Tyrannosaurus rex, looking especially at the implications for locomotion, ontogeny and growth. Giant dinosaurs grew quickly as far as we know, and the process is ultimately fascinating to everyone. From a 10 kg hatch weight to the 6000 kg adult Tyrannosaurus rex in 20 years is a speedy growth of a kind rarely found outside theropod dinosaurs.

Bringing up (T. rex) Baby

Birds like it sweet, bees like it sweeter

Birds like it sweet, bees like it sweeter

Posted Thu, 13 Oct 2011 09:16:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

MIT mathematicians delved into the arena of biology recently to explore optimization in nature. It turns out, bees are 'dippers' who feed by probing flowers with their tongues. For them, a thicker, sweeter fluid is best. But birds and butterflies draw nectar through thin tubes, and that's easier when flowers supply a thinner, less sugary fluid.

Birds like it sweet, bees like it sweeter

Release the 'Kraken', well the Artistic Triassic Cephalopod

Release the 'Kraken', well the Artistic Triassic Cephalopod

Posted Mon, 10 Oct 2011 14:07:00 GMT by Dave Collier

A strange explanation is given for a puzzling arrangement of Triassic era fossils. It could seem strange to apply the word 'artistic' to a Triassic creature but an in-depth examination of Ichthyosaur fossils has renewed the general confusion about what happened to the animals on display at Nevada's Berlin-Ichthyosaur State Park.

Release the 'Kraken', well the Artistic Triassic Cephalopod

Polar photography exhibition by Earth Times writer Louise Murray

Polar photography exhibition by Earth Times writer Louise Murray

Posted Sat, 08 Oct 2011 17:55:00 GMT by Louise Murray

The Earth Times environmental writer and award-winning photographer Louise Murray has a new exhibition of her polar photography at the Lacock Photography Gallery in the UK from October 15th 2011 to 31st January 2012.

Polar photography exhibition by Earth Times writer Louise Murray

Jumping like a fish out of water

Jumping like a fish out of water

Posted Thu, 06 Oct 2011 17:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Prof. Alice Gibb watched the catch jump from the net back into the water. It had jumping skills and knew what it wanted to do. Her study of feeding behaviour was abandoned and 'studies of stranding' became the new research aim. By now, she has achieved unbelievable results relevant to the (possibly frequent) evolution of land vertebrates from the fish, more than 300 million years ago.

Jumping like a fish out of water

Acrocanthosaurus atokensis dino tracks discovered in Arkansas

Acrocanthosaurus atokensis dino tracks discovered in Arkansas

Posted Thu, 06 Oct 2011 09:29:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Discovery of giant tracks from the Cretaceous in Arkansas from 120 million years ago. Acrocanthosaurus atokensis is one of the largest carnivores that ever existed. It is likely that the 60 cm x 30 cm footprint fit its profile, perfectly preserved in the desert-like Cretaceous mud.

Acrocanthosaurus atokensis dino tracks discovered in Arkansas

Largest ever butterfly map completed

Largest ever butterfly map completed

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2011 15:37:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

A European atlas recording the distribution of all of Europe's 441 butterfly species will be a vital tool to record how climate change is affecting these lovely creatures. The work of 272 field volunteers, say the publishers, has been vital to this grand new publication project.

Largest ever butterfly map completed

Tasmanian Devils fight hardest battle yet

Tasmanian Devils fight hardest battle yet

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2011 13:21:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

The Tasmanian Devil, an animal with a ferocious reputation is fighting for its life against an infectious cancer that is now beyond culling control according to a new study. While culling of diseased livestock is a relatively common agricultural practice, it remains controversial where wild animals are concerned.

Tasmanian Devils fight hardest battle yet

Chick attacks highlighted in study on the Nazca booby

Chick attacks highlighted in study on the Nazca booby

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2011 07:26:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Nazca Boobies, related to other ocean travellers such as the famous wandering albatross, live in the Galapagos. Unfortunately, parents have to leave nestlings frequently to fish long-distance. On the islands, such as this booby colony on Isla Espanola, there is an intense interest by certain adults in unrelated chicks, especially when its parents are necessarily absent for long periods.

Chick attacks highlighted in study on the Nazca booby

Video documents tool use by wild fish

Video documents tool use by wild fish

Posted Sun, 02 Oct 2011 18:02:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

A new video documents, for the first time, tool use by a fish. The video shows an orange-dotted tuskfish - a type of Wrasse—digging a clam out of the sand, carrying it in its mouth and swimming some distance to an appropriate location, before repeatedly flinging the bivalve against a reef rock to break its hard shell and expose the tasty flesh within.

Video documents tool use by wild fish

Elephants can take the heat

Elephants can take the heat

Posted Sun, 02 Oct 2011 16:11:01 GMT by Dale Kiefer

New research shows how elephants have adapted to extreme heat in a manner similar to desert mammals such as camels. Elephants have evolved a novel strategy for regulating body temperature, which allows them to endure soaring temperatures during the day without succumbing to heat stress.

Elephants can take the heat

First Usain Bolt, and now, Bats

First Usain Bolt, and now, Bats

Posted Sat, 01 Oct 2011 18:25:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The unique audio reception of the bats is aided by this truly freaky muscle that contracts 100X faster than normal muscle and 20X faster than the fastest human muscle, surrounding the eye. Weep ye who admire Mr. Bolts 100 metres: this bat could do it a little better, in 0.1 seconds!

First Usain Bolt, and now, Bats

Beetles keeping it bottled-up

Beetles keeping it bottled-up

Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2011 16:17:05 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The resemblance of a beer bottle to a female has been mooted in the past, but rarely remembered the morning after. An Australian (beetle) has now confirmed that 'stubbies' are better! The male Buprestid (jewel) beetle, Julodimorpha bakewelli, is often noticed lolling around near brown beer bottles (stubbies) in Australia.

Beetles keeping it bottled-up

A Frog's tale

A Frog's tale

Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2011 12:06:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Australian researchers have found that green tree frogs Litoria spp. use condensation in the same way as windows on frosty mornings. During the dry season from June to September, Ozzy water is a precious commodity. These enterprising Amphibia expose themselves in such a way as to gather the air's excess moisture when temperatures plummet.

A Frog's tale

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

Horse Sense

Posted Mon, 13 Oct 2014 20:04:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We’re mad about Madagascar.

Posted Sat, 11 Oct 2014 09:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bad news for corals and divers.

Posted Tue, 07 Oct 2014 08:30:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Voyage to/from Ancient New Zealand

Posted Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:15:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Language evolved quickly.

Posted Thu, 25 Sep 2014 08:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Monkeys redden up for breeding.

Posted Wed, 24 Sep 2014 07:54:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Budgies negotiate gaps

Posted Sun, 21 Sep 2014 11:06:39 GMT by Dave Armstrong

It's a peach of a story

Posted Sat, 06 Sep 2014 23:20:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Posted Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:01:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Posted Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:44:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Meet the wasp king - Megalara garuda

Posted Sun, 25 Mar 2012 17:23:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Dangerous liaisons - how Ireland's brown bears shaped polar bear evolution

Posted Thu, 07 Jul 2011 16:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Puma contribution to condors and scavengers in Patagonia

Posted Tue, 12 Jun 2012 23:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Humpback whales in super-aggregation in Antarctica

Posted Wed, 27 Apr 2011 21:10:00 GMT by Louise Murray

From garbage tip to wildlife haven - new theory for Everglades tree islands

Posted Tue, 22 Mar 2011 16:55:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Piranha Pop

Posted Thu, 13 Oct 2011 22:27:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bees know what's what

Posted Wed, 06 Nov 2013 07:36:56 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A new weapon against invasive species

Posted Wed, 16 Nov 2011 18:22:00 GMT by Ines Morales

A low oxygen switch may save crops from flooding

Posted Tue, 25 Oct 2011 12:27:01 GMT by Dave Collier

Why biodiversity really does matter

Posted Sun, 06 Mar 2011 12:50:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts