Earth Times Logo
RSS Feed Google+ Facebook Twitter Linked In Pinterest


Nature News

Zombie Worms Live

Zombie Worms Live

Posted Tue, 01 Nov 2011 11:40:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

If you can keep out of sight, don't mind darkness and leave no trace when you're dead, you too could be a zombie worm. After a few million years, we now have a way to detect the presence of these intriguing animals on fossil whales - otherwise known as bone worms.

Zombie Worms Live

Quick mapping of underwater volcano

Quick mapping of underwater volcano

Posted Mon, 31 Oct 2011 19:44:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Spanish scientists have taken just two weeks to map an underwater volcano in the Canary Islands in high resolution and continue to monitor its effects.

Quick mapping of underwater volcano

Wild Carpathia - Filming the Last Untouched European Wilderness

Wild Carpathia - Filming the Last Untouched European Wilderness

Posted Fri, 28 Oct 2011 13:41:00 GMT by Julian Jackson

Documentary featuring Prince of Wales premieres on Travel Channel. Wild Carpathia is a stunning documentary about a little-known part of Europe. Romania has a huge virtually-untouched area of mountains almost the size of Britain.

Wild Carpathia - Filming the Last Untouched European Wilderness

The Coral Triangle in Print

The Coral Triangle in Print

Posted Thu, 27 Oct 2011 13:21:00 GMT by Dave Collier

A book has been commissioned by the WWF to highlight the importance of the Coral Triangle. Covering approximately 6 million square kilometres of land and sea, the Coral Triangle is one of the world's most important natural habitats. It includes several nations including Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines and provides sustenance for over 120 million people.

The Coral Triangle in Print

A low oxygen switch may save crops from flooding

A low oxygen switch may save crops from flooding

Posted Tue, 25 Oct 2011 12:27:01 GMT by Dave Collier

Researchers have been investigating the mechanisms that allow some rice varieties to survive flooding. They believe that this will result in flood resistant crops.

A low oxygen switch may save crops from flooding

Bees Please

Bees Please

Posted Thu, 20 Oct 2011 20:49:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Personally speaking, a new species always delights the soul and two new stingless bees can't get up anyone's nose. David Roubik of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute thinks that changing sea levels brought a 'new' bee to western Panama before Coiba and Rancheria were separated from the mainland, presumably after an Ice Age.

Bees Please

Coral Diversified

Coral Diversified

Posted Tue, 18 Oct 2011 10:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

As corals go, Seriatopora hystrix, the bird's nest coral, is one of the attractive stony (scleractinian) corals that people love to see on the reef. The fact that it has different varieties (is 'genetically partitioned') on the northern Barrier Reef, means that for the first time, we can study the mechanisms of the natural selection of their symbiont algae and the corals themselves.

Coral Diversified

Flatworm Sexuality

Flatworm Sexuality

Posted Mon, 17 Oct 2011 21:57:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The Turbellarian flatworms are cute, minute slug-like metazoans that are so primitive, they haven’t got a body space (or coelom) like the rest of the animal nation. We know that some flatworms, such as Dugesia, have at least three races with different reproductive modes: asexual race, sexual race, and physiological race.

Flatworm Sexuality

Piranha Pop

Piranha Pop

Posted Thu, 13 Oct 2011 22:27:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Messrs Millot, Vandewalle and Parmentier took some piranhas to Liege and lost half of a finger. In the process, though, they managed to record the Red Belly sound. The red-bellied piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri has a good bark when it is picked up from the water, as do many of its kind.

Piranha Pop

Bringing up (T. rex) Baby

Bringing up (T. rex) Baby

Posted Thu, 13 Oct 2011 16:18:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Five brave researchers have completed a computer analysis of Tyrannosaurus rex, looking especially at the implications for locomotion, ontogeny and growth. Giant dinosaurs grew quickly as far as we know, and the process is ultimately fascinating to everyone. From a 10 kg hatch weight to the 6000 kg adult Tyrannosaurus rex in 20 years is a speedy growth of a kind rarely found outside theropod dinosaurs.

Bringing up (T. rex) Baby

Birds like it sweet, bees like it sweeter

Birds like it sweet, bees like it sweeter

Posted Thu, 13 Oct 2011 09:16:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

MIT mathematicians delved into the arena of biology recently to explore optimization in nature. It turns out, bees are 'dippers' who feed by probing flowers with their tongues. For them, a thicker, sweeter fluid is best. But birds and butterflies draw nectar through thin tubes, and that's easier when flowers supply a thinner, less sugary fluid.

Birds like it sweet, bees like it sweeter

Release the 'Kraken', well the Artistic Triassic Cephalopod

Release the 'Kraken', well the Artistic Triassic Cephalopod

Posted Mon, 10 Oct 2011 14:07:00 GMT by Dave Collier

A strange explanation is given for a puzzling arrangement of Triassic era fossils. It could seem strange to apply the word 'artistic' to a Triassic creature but an in-depth examination of Ichthyosaur fossils has renewed the general confusion about what happened to the animals on display at Nevada's Berlin-Ichthyosaur State Park.

Release the 'Kraken', well the Artistic Triassic Cephalopod

Polar photography exhibition by Earth Times writer Louise Murray

Polar photography exhibition by Earth Times writer Louise Murray

Posted Sat, 08 Oct 2011 17:55:00 GMT by Louise Murray

The Earth Times environmental writer and award-winning photographer Louise Murray has a new exhibition of her polar photography at the Lacock Photography Gallery in the UK from October 15th 2011 to 31st January 2012.

Polar photography exhibition by Earth Times writer Louise Murray

Jumping like a fish out of water

Jumping like a fish out of water

Posted Thu, 06 Oct 2011 17:20:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Prof. Alice Gibb watched the catch jump from the net back into the water. It had jumping skills and knew what it wanted to do. Her study of feeding behaviour was abandoned and 'studies of stranding' became the new research aim. By now, she has achieved unbelievable results relevant to the (possibly frequent) evolution of land vertebrates from the fish, more than 300 million years ago.

Jumping like a fish out of water

Acrocanthosaurus atokensis dino tracks discovered in Arkansas

Acrocanthosaurus atokensis dino tracks discovered in Arkansas

Posted Thu, 06 Oct 2011 09:29:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Discovery of giant tracks from the Cretaceous in Arkansas from 120 million years ago. Acrocanthosaurus atokensis is one of the largest carnivores that ever existed. It is likely that the 60 cm x 30 cm footprint fit its profile, perfectly preserved in the desert-like Cretaceous mud.

Acrocanthosaurus atokensis dino tracks discovered in Arkansas

Largest ever butterfly map completed

Largest ever butterfly map completed

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2011 15:37:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

A European atlas recording the distribution of all of Europe's 441 butterfly species will be a vital tool to record how climate change is affecting these lovely creatures. The work of 272 field volunteers, say the publishers, has been vital to this grand new publication project.

Largest ever butterfly map completed

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Posted Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:44:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Jackdaws lose their winning ways

Posted Wed, 06 Aug 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Diet in mammals is complex

Posted Wed, 09 Jul 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Forest loss accelerates

Posted Mon, 30 Jun 2014 08:58:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

How are butterflies and moths related?

Posted Wed, 25 Jun 2014 07:14:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Posted Wed, 18 Jun 2014 07:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bear with us

Posted Tue, 10 Jun 2014 06:50:28 GMT by JW Dowey

Gannets prove to be discard specialists

Posted Wed, 04 Jun 2014 11:32:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Desert memories and route guidance - for ants

Posted Wed, 28 May 2014 12:08:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The whales don't mix between ocean basins

Posted Wed, 21 May 2014 00:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Tarsier Secretly Squeaking

Posted Thu, 09 Feb 2012 16:11:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Shrimp backs scientists vertical migration theory

Posted Thu, 10 Mar 2011 21:31:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Coral Diversified

Posted Tue, 18 Oct 2011 10:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Ants, plants and pitchers

Posted Thu, 23 May 2013 18:07:19 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Tarantula in the scanner unveils its double-beating heart

Posted Fri, 01 Jul 2011 00:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Flatworm Sexuality

Posted Mon, 17 Oct 2011 21:57:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Shrink-wrapped Shrimps

Posted Wed, 28 Sep 2011 12:50:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

No Leopard like a Snow Leopard

Posted Fri, 02 Mar 2012 15:39:50 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Turtles are specialists at hearing underwater

Posted Tue, 20 Mar 2012 23:11:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Polar bears starvation risk as Hudson Bay ice is late arriving

Posted Tue, 23 Nov 2010 18:50:00 GMT by Lucy Brake