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Budgies negotiate gaps

Budgies negotiate gaps

Posted Sun, 21 Sep 2014 11:06:39 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Flight in our birds and bats is an interesting process as well as a part of life that we always seem to want to emulate. Avoiding obstacles within a flock, or negotiating forests is an area we need to study for our own needs, even if we simply use it for in-flight entertainment. The serious use of bird mechanisms for various aircraft such as drones is always likely as robotic systems develop.

Budgies negotiate gaps

 It's a peach of a story

It's a peach of a story

Posted Sat, 06 Sep 2014 23:20:00 GMT by JW Dowey

How did the peach become selected from the typical forest tree. Was it developed like many fruits as a recent addition to food habits, or did it become domesticated early, like the goat, the dog and the pig, to provide a rich varied diet for early agriculturalists?

It's a peach of a story

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Posted Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:01:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The mammals and the birds are in competition. How many species will we find that can understand tool-using concepts, and then socially interact with their uses?

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Posted Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:44:00 GMT by JW Dowey

The sale of the most remarkable egg ever known is about to take place. Your local museum may not be able to attract the visitors it would like for a simple egg, but the imagination runs wild at the ancient world this egg would have hatched into!

Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Jackdaws lose their winning ways

Jackdaws lose their winning ways

Posted Wed, 06 Aug 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A lovely species like the Eurasian jackdaw could be expected to have an interesting, eventful and full life among its colleagues, his mate and his nestlings. Not so, I’m afraid, for the high-fliers in society.

Jackdaws lose their winning ways

Diet in mammals is complex

Diet in mammals is complex

Posted Wed, 09 Jul 2014 04:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

How could you classify the diets of mammals for so long without noting the need many species have for fruit, certain plants, or even a bit of animal material for a so-called herbivore? Carnivores need roughage in the same way the human diet has special requirements and herbivores can cheat by gaining essential minerals they would be unable to extract from plants.

Diet in mammals is complex

Forest loss accelerates

Forest loss accelerates

Posted Mon, 30 Jun 2014 08:58:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We need these forests to retain some of the remaining carbon. We need these trees so that biodiversity around them remains. We need these animals to represent something of the old earth, that used to work as an entity. We need to act very very quickly.

Forest loss accelerates

How are butterflies and moths related?

How are butterflies and moths related?

Posted Wed, 25 Jun 2014 07:14:00 GMT by JW Dowey

When science illuminates an area, it's not always easy to see how. In this case we try and show that the brilliant butterfly or moth has a fascinating ancestry and intriguing sets of current relatives. The publication of this paper is great progress, but we doubt if we can fully explain, more than just show the pics and links!

How are butterflies and moths related?

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Posted Wed, 18 Jun 2014 07:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Why and how do island species suffer so much from cats, rats and dogs, and the rest of the invasive species? A few hundred years too late, we might finally be getting around to countering the effects of predators on the most vulnerable of animal species. There are also the native predators to consider, of course.

Cats control lizard populations but the reptiles adapt well

Bear with us

Bear with us

Posted Tue, 10 Jun 2014 06:50:28 GMT by JW Dowey

Nature has wonderful problems to solve, but human help is needed when the precarious genetic integrity of our Pyrenean bears is threatened. One bear has built up the population, but now the inbreeding that threatens all small rare species' populations must be reversed.

Bear with us

Gannets prove to be discard specialists

Gannets prove to be discard specialists

Posted Wed, 04 Jun 2014 11:32:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

When fisheries policies change, we have rarely managed to avoid mistakes in estimating the effects. Here we have happy gannets but when fishing discards are prevented, the rocky islands around Ireland and the rest of Europe will be less populous than before.

Gannets prove to be discard specialists

Desert memories and route guidance - for ants

Desert memories and route guidance - for ants

Posted Wed, 28 May 2014 12:08:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

This desert ant is an amazing route finder in extreme conditions. Efforts to discover its 'technique' have so far faltered, but this research shows the ant-centric approach works.

Desert memories and route guidance - for ants

The whales don't mix between ocean basins

The whales don't mix between ocean basins

Posted Wed, 21 May 2014 00:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Known for migration, their sweet songs and the tremendous breaching behaviour they exhibit near some coasts, the humpbacks are unique, like many whale species. Now it looks like their uniqueness could be threefold.

The whales don't mix between ocean basins

Tiny Australian crayfish is brand new species

Tiny Australian crayfish is brand new species

Posted Wed, 09 Apr 2014 07:55:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

How can we make sure that tiny new species with newly-discovered populations are not predated by novel predators, run over by bulldozers or simply forgotten about during developments? The answer needs to be found from the Amazon to central Asia, Africa and Australia. And who can say that we don't all need to check the other wild places, even near our cities and waste sites?

Tiny Australian crayfish is brand new species

Visual effects created by bower birds

Visual effects created by bower birds

Posted Wed, 02 Apr 2014 08:51:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Among the most intricate displays of courtship in any species, the bower birds have intrigued us for centuries. Finally, we may be getting close to a full understanding of how such glorious behaviours work and how they came about!

Visual effects created by bower birds

Spider sociability

Spider sociability

Posted Wed, 26 Mar 2014 10:00:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

How did social behaviour evolve, and why do we see it in so many animals, no matter what level of taxonomy they are found? Spiders, sticklebacks and insects, birds, mammals and reptiles are all involved in complex social interaction.

Spider sociability

Nature News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

Horse Sense

Posted Mon, 13 Oct 2014 20:04:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We’re mad about Madagascar.

Posted Sat, 11 Oct 2014 09:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bad news for corals and divers.

Posted Tue, 07 Oct 2014 08:30:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Voyage to/from Ancient New Zealand

Posted Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:15:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Language evolved quickly.

Posted Thu, 25 Sep 2014 08:17:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Monkeys redden up for breeding.

Posted Wed, 24 Sep 2014 07:54:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Budgies negotiate gaps

Posted Sun, 21 Sep 2014 11:06:39 GMT by Dave Armstrong

It's a peach of a story

Posted Sat, 06 Sep 2014 23:20:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Tool use and manufacture, but by birds

Posted Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:01:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Eggs of elephant birds still reign supreme

Posted Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:44:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Hurricane Katia becomes category 4 storm

Posted Tue, 06 Sep 2011 08:56:56 GMT by Laura Brown

Comparing cities and blood systems with Atta forest ants

Posted Wed, 15 Feb 2012 00:05:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The memory of squamates is better than you think

Posted Wed, 29 Aug 2012 13:39:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Remarkable rodent rediscovered after 113 years

Posted Thu, 19 May 2011 13:51:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Whale sharks regulate their body temperature

Posted Wed, 17 Oct 2012 13:29:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Bison Hazing by Helicopter Sparks Lawsuit

Posted Thu, 19 May 2011 14:33:01 GMT by Melanie J. Martin

Meet Lesula, Congo's Colourful New Species of Monkey

Posted Thu, 13 Sep 2012 18:14:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

New Caledonian crows and their tools

Posted Sat, 17 Dec 2011 09:18:29 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Yet another natural disaster in the offing for California

Posted Wed, 26 Jan 2011 11:55:00 GMT by Michael Evans

DNA tests unravel a tricky tortoise mystery

Posted Wed, 29 Jun 2011 16:11:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry