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Background Noise Can Effect Students Test Scores

Background Noise Can Effect Students Test Scores

Posted Mon, 31 Oct 2011 16:51:00 GMT by James Mathews

The Acoustical Society of America has been carrying out research to find what helps to increase the quality of a learning environment to help with the absorption of more information or better results and what can decrease these factors as well.

Background Noise Can Effect Students Test Scores

Secondhand smoke in California

Secondhand smoke in California

Posted Fri, 28 Oct 2011 17:19:00 GMT by Ines Morales

Article on secondhand smoke in California, according to a recent UCLA study. If official statistics are to be trusted, the state of California has less smokers than any other state in the U.S., except Missouri. Good for them, right? After all, it has been scientifically proved that smoking is hazardous for your health.

Secondhand smoke in California

Over 70's kidney transplants safe

Over 70's kidney transplants safe

Posted Fri, 28 Oct 2011 13:24:01 GMT by James Mathews

New research has shown that transplants from the elderly could be totally safe. It had previously been thought that people of senior age could be at serious risk when donating a kidney, however in Washington, DC a study in the CJASN, has claimed that healthy people over 70 years of age can indeed safely donate a kidney.

Over 70's kidney transplants safe

Room for one more

Room for one more

Posted Tue, 25 Oct 2011 12:39:31 GMT by Laura Brown

What impact will the world's seven billionth human have? The United Nations is estimating that next Monday, the world's 7 billionth inhabitant will be born. It is a milestone that has economists, scientists and politicians wondering whether the earth's population is reaching breaking point.

Room for one more

Relax guys, the stress will kill you

Relax guys, the stress will kill you

Posted Fri, 21 Oct 2011 08:19:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

A new long-term study concluded that middle-aged men who experience repeated episodes of moderate to high stress life events over a relatively short period experienced a 50% increase in mortality. Being married and drinking moderately may help reduce risk, however.

Relax guys, the stress will kill you

Antibody therapy to treat Hendra virus in humans

Antibody therapy to treat Hendra virus in humans

Posted Thu, 20 Oct 2011 18:52:01 GMT by Dave Collier

A antibody has been developed to treat the Hendra virus. This is the first treatment available for this disease. The Hendra virus is a type of henipavirus, a virus often carried by bats. The cross-species infection was alarming and the route from bat to horse and then to humans was something that researchers wanted to block. When infected with Nipa, another henipavirus, humans suffer a 75% fatality rate.

Antibody therapy to treat Hendra virus in humans

Malaria vaccine maybe closer after successful trial

Malaria vaccine maybe closer after successful trial

Posted Thu, 20 Oct 2011 14:26:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Drug giant GSK and Bill Gates' foundation say testing of a new malaria vaccine in Africa has produced promising results. In the 6,000 five to seventeen-month-old children vaccinated with three doses of the drug, there was a reduced risk of contracting clinical malaria (56% down) and severe malaria (47%).

Malaria vaccine maybe closer after successful trial

Mammals' heart disease risk may be a quirk of evolution

Mammals' heart disease risk may be a quirk of evolution

Posted Tue, 18 Oct 2011 01:21:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Mammals have developed a uniquely efficient blood clotting mechanism, which probably offered a survival advantage. But that same advantage comes at a price: a higher risk of heart disease. The culprits are important components of mammalian blood known as platelets, which helped protect early mammals from injury.

Mammals' heart disease risk may be a quirk of evolution

Chocolate may well be a girl's best friend

Chocolate may well be a girl's best friend

Posted Wed, 12 Oct 2011 00:41:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Chocolate consumption has been linked to a lower incidence of stroke in women. A new study published this week in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology concludes that women who wolfed down the most chocolate were significantly less likely to suffer a stroke than their peers who abstained from the delectable dark stuff.

Chocolate may well be a girl's best friend

Restless Legs Syndrome linked to hypertension in women

Restless Legs Syndrome linked to hypertension in women

Posted Tue, 11 Oct 2011 18:39:01 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is linked to high blood pressure incidence in middle-aged women, according to the results of a new study. Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is an often unpleasant condition characterized by intense pain in the legs and an inability to keep the legs still, especially at night.

Restless Legs Syndrome linked to hypertension in women

Optimistic people wired differently

Optimistic people wired differently

Posted Tue, 11 Oct 2011 05:37:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Optimistic people's sunny outlook may be due to 'faulty' brain functioning, according to the results of a new study published this week in Nature Neuroscience. The study shows that optimistic people tend to learn only from information that reinforces their sunny outlook. While it may be helpful in trying times, the trait is essentially due to 'faulty' functioning in the frontal lobes of their brains.

Optimistic people wired differently

Sixty-percent increase in TBIs among US youth athletes

Sixty-percent increase in TBIs among US youth athletes

Posted Sat, 08 Oct 2011 10:49:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Traumatic Brain Injuries are up by 60%, but the higher numbers probably reflect better awareness, rather than increased injuries. The higher rates may reflect the effectiveness of an awareness campaign, the Heads Up Initiative, launched about a decade ago to promote awareness about TBI among coaches, parents, clinicians and educators.

Sixty-percent increase in TBIs among US youth athletes

NIH to examine how climate change may affect public health

NIH to examine how climate change may affect public health

Posted Fri, 07 Oct 2011 13:18:04 GMT by Dale Kiefer

The U.S. National Institutes of Health is sponsoring extensive research to determine the potential ill effects of climate change on public health. Examples of potential climate related illnesses include asthma and other respiratory illnesses, gastrointestinal diseases, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, and deaths related to extreme weather, such as hurricanes, tornadoes and floods.

NIH to examine how climate change may affect public health

Smoking linked to rising tuberculosis deaths worldwide

Smoking linked to rising tuberculosis deaths worldwide

Posted Thu, 06 Oct 2011 07:21:00 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Efforts to eradicate tuberculosis in the developing world have been thwarted by rising rates of smoking addiction. Smoking is projected to account for 40 million additional deaths from tuberculosis between 2010 and 2050.

Smoking linked to rising tuberculosis deaths worldwide

Social Media may help college students with drinking problems

Social Media may help college students with drinking problems

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2011 11:36:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

College students likely to have problems with alcohol could be spotted and helped via their favourite social networking sites, according to a new study which found a good link between those students who talked online about heavy drinking and those who were rated as at risk from alcohol.

Social Media may help college students with drinking problems

$6.7 billion of medical spend wasted in one year says study

$6.7 billion of medical spend wasted in one year says study

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2011 08:22:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

With paying for healthcare a hot political topic in the USA, a study that found enormous amounts of money was wasted on branded drugs and pointless tests may have big implications. A staggering $6.7 billion of US medical spending in just one year is wasted on tests that aren't needed and expensive branded drugs according to new research.

$6.7 billion of medical spend wasted in one year says study

Health News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

Has the mosquito had its Day?

Posted Sat, 20 Aug 2016 10:40:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Latest Genetic Links with Medicine.

Posted Thu, 24 Dec 2015 12:51:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

On being the right size

Posted Sun, 06 Dec 2015 11:46:34 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Spider bites and necrosis!

Posted Fri, 13 Mar 2015 09:37:00 GMT by JW Dowey

How AIDS moved from chimpanzees and, now, gorillas.

Posted Tue, 03 Mar 2015 11:48:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Mosquitoes have the best malaria strategy!

Posted Sun, 08 Feb 2015 11:10:35 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Do we choose senescence or eternal youth?

Posted Tue, 20 Jan 2015 11:11:07 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Cats spread parasites (and destroy wildlife.)

Posted Fri, 16 Jan 2015 10:13:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Whale genes needed for age research

Posted Mon, 05 Jan 2015 09:44:01 GMT by JW Dowey

Natural Human Lives

Posted Sun, 07 Dec 2014 19:49:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Simple measures could drastically cut child diarrhea deaths

Posted Wed, 23 Mar 2011 11:57:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Stopping smoking during pregnancy reduces health risks to babies

Posted Wed, 06 Jul 2011 20:50:00 GMT by Kieran Ball

Three million babies and mothers lives could be saved in poorer countries

Posted Thu, 14 Apr 2011 06:17:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Social Media may help college students with drinking problems

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2011 11:36:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Stress increases damaging effects of traffic pollution in children

Posted Sat, 25 Jun 2011 11:36:00 GMT by Kieran Ball

Possible danger in fire safety chemicals revealed by fish tests

Posted Thu, 26 May 2011 09:42:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Background Noise Can Effect Students Test Scores

Posted Mon, 31 Oct 2011 16:51:00 GMT by James Mathews

Can nutrition alone reverse established cancers?

Posted Wed, 04 May 2011 14:49:00 GMT by Kieran Ball

Evolution in medicine - Part II

Posted Wed, 29 Aug 2012 20:47:10 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Virus shrinks cancer cells

Posted Fri, 02 Sep 2011 12:01:00 GMT by Gracie Valena