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Wildlife

Ant eater lovers wanted

Ant eater lovers wanted



Why must we hunt and make extinct those animals we know need conservation and, better than that, protection of all kinds? Bolivia hunts the giant ant eater and they’re extinct in Costa Rica and Uruguay. These habits of old have to die, or there will be nothing left in places where there should be a highly saleable diversity.

Diverse worlds of animals and plants disappearing

Diverse worlds of animals and plants disappearing

We need help to preserve the fantastic variation found in some areas of the world, alongside a full-blooded conservation effort for all plants and animals such as the widespread but unique Echidna here!

Forest loss accelerates

Forest loss accelerates

We need these forests to retain some of the remaining carbon. We need these trees so that biodiversity around them remains. We need these animals to represent something of the old earth, that used to work as an entity. We need to act very very quickly.

Virunga National Park safe - for now

Virunga National Park safe - for now



We have one success with one of the most important wildlife sites on earth. Let’s move on from the Virunga with more knowledgeable executives and more support generally for these rich habitats that are now so few in number.

Foxy moves for successful species

Foxy moves for successful species



What a turn up for the book. The Arctic fox didn't evolve from Eurasian or North American relatives. Instead, the climates of the Himalaya and Arctic were at one time similar enough to encourage migration in several animals. This species of fox must now be counted as related to an extinct animal that adapted thousands of kilometres away to mountainous terrain that resembles its present niche.

Finding sheep 'geneius' in their genome

Finding sheep 'geneius' in their genome

What can we make of the revelations on how species are really related to each other - or not? Big business will certainly cash in on the wool or any wool substitute alternative, just as spider silk is building into a stiff competitor. We all benefit from the science that informs, with Open wherever possible, and creates almost automatic advances in our culture. The sheep has been with us from the beginning of settlements and still looks likely to give us information on how we have eaten and kept warm and how domestic animals have changed, not always for our convenience.

Rare crocodile increasing with grassroots conservation

Rare crocodile increasing with grassroots conservation

The rare animals of this word need government legal protection and local people involved in their conservation and that of their habitats. Tourism is only one of the benefits that comes from successful work, there’s also the huge pride in being the only people to have such a beast!

Orangs threatened again in Sumatra

Orangs threatened again in Sumatra



The Sumatran problem where people and industry are always given priority over natural ecosystems is reaching a climax, as the last vestiges of tropical forest go under thee axe. apart from the smoke pollution hanging over the burning, the animal species involved are among the rarest large animals anywhere. It's incredible that local interests can still prevent national government and international organisations from trying to conserve these precious areas still left.

Leatherback logging in the Atlantic

Leatherback logging in the Atlantic



The study of marine turtles is linked with tagging of many other animals, but if we lose these leatherback giants of the seas, we will have lost a species that can relay how conditions millions of years ago influenced even bigger turtles and of course every other species that existed at the time.

Spider sociability

Spider sociability

How did social behaviour evolve, and why do we see it in so many animals, no matter what level of taxonomy they are found? Spiders, sticklebacks and insects, birds, mammals and reptiles are all involved in complex social interaction.

Bats' flight changes

Bats' flight changes

When we study insects and birds in the air, or other animals in water, the interest often lies in how they can change their locomotive effort in order to counteract wind or currents. The use of computer modelling can also add the extra benefit of prediction of movement under various conditions.

The jumper, the weaver and the spitting spider

The jumper, the weaver and the spitting spider



The intricacies of life bamboozle us daily. When it gets down to social animals and those that associate with them, the fascination can be really endless.

Swimming sloths with aquatic adaptations

Swimming sloths with aquatic adaptations

One group of sloths made the quite unlikely shift to water, possibly because of a drying environment in the Miocene. This clever paper shows how they coped with a marine life, just like early whales, by adapting their bone compactness. Our pygmy sloths on the Panamanian island of Isla Escudo de Veraguas are the most recent speciation, around 9,000 years ago. These guys were several species on a sea trip!

Natural Curiosities and top ten animals

Natural Curiosities and top ten animals

Attenborough is at it again. His latest is a series starting Tuesday which relates the stories of animals that survive unusual situations.

The right whale, by satellite

The right whale, by satellite

When you want to count how many rare animals are out there, remote cameras have come into their own. Now even the spy in the sky can help, with the first study of a whale species that has been having high mortality problems with its calves.

Riverside vegetation and favoured birds

Riverside vegetation and favoured birds

Ways to improve our environment vary from cutting everything down to leaving corridors for animals and plants to penetrate. This study recommends really trying to encourage riverside vegetation. It achieves the complexity that we miss so often in anthropogenic landscapes.

Ocean acidity experience improves offspring responses

Ocean acidity experience improves offspring responses



How do marine animals cope with raised acidity in the sea? We have to study how adjustment can work, if species are able to adjust to future levels at all.

Winners and losers in the great warming!

Winners and losers in the great warming!



So will global warming affect your garden or the wild animals and plants around you? The answer is now clear, as more and more results appear around the earth, from drought and flood to simply warmer summers.

Bird speciations made clear

Bird speciations made clear

We can catalogue all the live and some extinct species on earth. The sooner we know all those insects and marine creatures, the quicker we can deal with conservation management in the most efficient ways possible.

Uruguayan fish show how they evolve

Uruguayan fish show how they evolve

Fish diversify into thousands of species, especially cichlids in African lakes. Mammals and birds can show equal diversity sometimes, so it would be intriguing to find more vertebrate classes subjected to investigations such as these, proving some genetic matches for lost and current animals we want to know more about.

Lions and tigers lived longer ago

Lions and tigers lived longer ago

How the lion and the tiger were related to American lions, the jaguar and several extinct species fascinates to the point of absorption. These are legendary, iconic animals whose presence on the planet has always caused us to admire their adaptations and abilities. And to fear their tremendous power, of course.

Ancestor of Tyrannosaurus found

Ancestor of Tyrannosaurus found

The sea levels in ancient America seem to have been one of the factors responsible for the isolation and speciation of magnificent beasts in Utah - and then their migration across continents.

The Lost World of Australia

The Lost World of Australia



Who says there’s no excitement, these days. Simply find an isolated stretch of forest and get yourself out there to see if the animals that live there are different from other species. Of course, you’ll need a doctorate involving the study of the species involved and plenty of funding, and a good camera, and somebody who can cook up some good tucker, and great boots, and tracking devices, and---. Well maybe stay home for now and just read about somebody else doing it!

Conservation and sport help turtles

Conservation and sport help turtles

New methods of promoting conservation are very much needed, as turtles approach extinction for some species. The golfers are among those who could easily give a lead in helping out endangered animals, or even those plants on the links!

Oil threat to Virunga National Park

Oil threat to Virunga National Park



When oil money contaminates Africa, it has produced no improvement in the lot of local people. In perhaps the most spectacular of wildlife 'locations' on earth, it is time to draw the line and pull out all the stops that conservation has.

Tapirs losing habitat and they’re still hunted!

Tapirs losing habitat and they’re still hunted!

Worldwide, even the obvious and large animals are in danger, never mind the tiny and inconspicuous species, such as the tapir. How on earth can we manage to restrain our own species from the careless and useless destruction of habitat that is the basis of almost every extinction?

World Animal Day 2013

World Animal Day 2013



Why not rediscover your enthusiasm for every animal on earth? While we concentrate on wildlife, the love of life easily stretches to farm animals, our pets and, of course, the mistreatment that some creatures, both domestic and wild and free, suffer from human interference.

Smallest animals around, for now!

Smallest animals around, for now!

A simple summary of some small creatures, missing out some such as the flies and beetles, because I know there will be new discoveries around the corner!

Animals of the world, complete!

Animals of the world, complete!

All the animals on earth deserve a better fate. We have made them extinct and rare in so many cases. Now is the time to make some amends by at least listing, as perfectly as possible, the entirety of their species.

Travelling orang

Travelling orang

Sumatran male orang-utans make their intentions clear in this paper on behaviour that makes planning one of those details that makes some animals different.

Kemp's Ridley turtles saved by science?

Kemp's Ridley turtles saved by science?

Evidence is needed for the survival of many critically endangered animals when they disappear from our sight and reappear many years later in situations such as the open ocean or the dense tropical forests. Conservationists desperately need to know how they can be helped through their young stages and brought back from the brink of extinction.

Niches and speciation in orca

Niches and speciation in orca

It might seem disappointing to fond that your Atlantic orcas don’t have the speciation evident in some Pacific pods. However, the great find here is that populations almost certainly have to be physically separated, as well as having different niches, in order for a new species to be evolved.

Goat History

Goat History



When we look at the cultures that use the goat as a symbol, an icon or simply as an image of domesticity, we begin to understand just how long people have used animal species as an integrated part of their lives. The animals also changed to suit us.

The Rise of the Continents

The Rise of the Continents



The marvels of African wildlife, followed by other continents, as Iain Stewart points out the tectonic reasons why life has assumed its rich variety of shapes and sizes.

Eels, Alps and Trees

Eels, Alps and Trees

The ways of the world mean we lose rare species frequently these days. What we haven’t so far realised is they are the very plants and animals that keep us going!

Pangolin Paradise in Vietnam

Pangolin Paradise in Vietnam

When Chinese people eat scales of pangolins, they are destroying several species of a unique and precious mammal in the forest food web. Vietnam has begun the slow process of re-education and also getting the animals back into a depleted number of habitats.

The Nudibranch Exposed - Correction

The Nudibranch Exposed - Correction

The naming of some sea-slugs is plagued with aged specimens that seem to have become extinct and poorly understood relationships, even between the common species. Here is a valiant and successful attempt to sort out these beautiful animals.

Neonicotinoid nightmares

Neonicotinoid nightmares

Pesticide use in increasing with a concurrent loss in the abundance of many animals. Here, a Dutch team discover some new correlations between the two.

Dolphin ecology from the inside out

Dolphin ecology from the inside out

The bottlenose dolphin is the key species to check if strandings and live animals have different stomach contents. This study confirms they have not, which leaves the field clear for extremely valuable research on rare species.

Evolving Doors

Evolving Doors



A new study has been published on how environmental change effects the evolutionary process. The question of whether speciation is a quick process or a cold unending and slow bore is nearing an answer.

Conservationists celebrate increase in mountain gorilla numbers

Conservationists celebrate increase in mountain gorilla numbers

The world population of mountain gorillas has increased to 880 individuals, according to the latest census data released by the Uganda Wildlife Authority.

The wolf at the door and the sandpiper that migrates: Animals in their niches

The wolf at the door and the sandpiper that migrates: Animals in their niches



Do lots of packs of wolves exist in an ideal habitat, with fewer wolves away from this centre of a geographical area?

That oil palm problem - again?

That oil palm problem - again?



The interminable expansion of oil palm plantations in the Far East is the cause of carbon emissions, climate change and loss of wildlife habitat.

World Rhino Day ~ 22nd September 2012

World Rhino Day ~ 22nd September 2012

The rhino is one of the most endangered animals in the world. Poachers using sophisticated methods kill enormous numbers for their horns, which are thought by Chinese medicine advocates to have medicinal properties. This has been proved to be untrue and since it is impossible to stop the poachers, the only hope for the rhino is to persuade users of rhino horn that using it for medical treatment is a futile exercise.

Asian Species in Crisis

Asian Species in Crisis



From orang-utan to giant catfish, the exotic animals of Asia are just about the most endangered, and loved, on earth.

Bold or shy, elk find shooting very selective

Bold or shy, elk find shooting very selective

New research on elk shows two different personality traits - the 'bold' and the 'shy'. University of Calgary, the University of Alberta and the University College, Dublin publish their paper on elk, and artificial selection by hunters.

Endemism - how does it work?

Endemism - how does it work?



An island is often a haven for speciation but many mainland species have developed to be endemic in isolated areas too. A new study compares rates of species turnover on Caribbean islands and the Neotropical mainland.

Aping parrots?

Aping parrots?

A new study into African Grey parrot intelligence using acoustic association. While several animals now appear to almost equal the apes in intelligence, conclusive proof was needed.

Killing Simbas: Lion Trade

Killing Simbas: Lion Trade



Banning the lion trade, stopping lion poachers and trophy hunters. Lions have always been victims to poaching and game hunting for egotistical humans who can only affirm their value by boasting trophy killings as a display of their dominion over all other animals.

Slow loris poaching and the illegal pet trade

Slow loris poaching and the illegal pet trade

International Animal Rescue help suffering animals such as slow lorises. The slow loris is a species affected by the illegal pet trade, poachers catch them and remove their poisonous teeth. Marta and Willis were the first attempt by IAR to rehabilitate slow lorises and return them back to the wild.

Springwatch: Which trio are as fruity as a nuthatch?

Springwatch: Which trio are as fruity as a nuthatch?



Springwatch is back on TV and the wildlife webcams are now live. So the nuthatch and the mole, the worm and hopefully maybe the mole cricket will be up for it and leaping into the capable cameras of the BBC Natural History unit.

Bluefin Tuna dispersal tracked for the first time

Bluefin Tuna dispersal tracked for the first time

Satellite tagging is becoming fascinating in some animals, none more so than the endangered bluefin tuna. 132 juvenile tuna fish were tagged and implanted, then followed for four years.

Light Pollution: Animals affected by HPS lighting interference

Light Pollution: Animals affected by HPS lighting interference

Study looks at the impact of artificial light on the environment. Light pollution can be just as severe as any, given its immense significance to living organisms, their physiology, behaviour, reproduction and predator - prey interactions.

Are Conservation Groups Right to Prioritize 'Iconic' Species?

Are Conservation Groups Right to Prioritize 'Iconic' Species?



Conservationists are often accused of prioritizing 'cute and cuddly' animals over les glamorous species. For their part, some conservationists argue that harnessing the potential of 'flagship species' such as gorillas, tigers and pandas does far more good than harm. Tackling this issue for 'The Earth Times Asks' series of debates are Helen Buckland and Nathan Yaussy.

Giant polyandrous bees

Giant polyandrous bees



New research done on giant honey bees (Apis dorsata). New study highlights the genetic difficulties of working with animals that mate with many partners (polyandry).

Biological community building

Biological community building

Scientists have approached the community of plants and animals that builds in a natural habitat from a novel direction in a new study. Using caves as isolated, extreme habitats for a community, they worked out whether the organism's niche acts as a mechanism to keep the community operating in an ecosystem.

Peregrines produce despite vandals and egg stealers

Peregrines produce despite vandals and egg stealers



Peregrine falcon and osprey lay eggs in Scotland. Lady of the Loch (and partner) plus a pair of Peregrine falcons have laid eggs confirmed by the Scottish Wildlife Trust.

WCS pledges to protect endangered freshwater turtles and tortoises

WCS pledges to protect endangered freshwater turtles and tortoises

The Wildlife Conservation Society says it plans to do all it can to protect some of the world's most endangered freshwater turtles and tortoises.

Burgess Shale - Life and death as they knew it

Burgess Shale - Life and death as they knew it

The Burgess Shale fossils are one major example of the Cambrian carbonaceous compressions of small bodied animals in mud.

Fishy modelling

Fishy modelling



Modelling and hydrodynamics. If locomotion drove evolution in the same way as it seemed to drive the industrial revolution, ignoring the efficiency of an animal's metabolism, these models of marine animals could almost be the real thing.

New York State aims to protect coastal wildlife and promote wind power

New York State aims to protect coastal wildlife and promote wind power



A new collaborative report has been compiled to help promote offshore renewable energy developments in New York State, while protecting fish and birdlife.

Coral reef fish saviours?

Coral reef fish saviours?

A new study has shown how co-managed fisheries prove quite successful. To protect fish stocks from overfishing co-management schemes have been evaluated by the Wildlife Conservation Society and various universities.

Foodies Fake the Future

Foodies Fake the Future

Is animal-free meat a real possibility? We eat meat and always have done, but a revolution is slowly taking place to end cruel factory-like conditions that some animals, large and small, suffer. There is need for a meat that can be produced cheaply and, here's the crunch, how about animal free.

Dragonflies and Damselflies disperse in the heat

Dragonflies and Damselflies disperse in the heat

A new study looks at how water habitats affect the dispersal ability of animals. The hypothesis tested is if dragonflies and damselflies are able to adapt more quickly to recent climate change where the water is still or lentic.

Fungal infection kills rare rattlesnakes

Fungal infection kills rare rattlesnakes

Eastern Massasauga rattlesnakes are being killed by a rare fungal infection seldom found in wild animals, says a wildlife vet. Chrysosporium is killing the endangered snake in America.

New sanctuaries for rare freshwater dolphins in Asia

New sanctuaries for rare freshwater dolphins in Asia

Three new wildlife sanctuaries, created in the giant Sundarbans mangrove forest, in Bangladesh, will help protect endangered Irrawaddy and Ganges River dolphins.

Unique fish are dealt a dodgy deal

Unique fish are dealt a dodgy deal



For three species in the family Notthenioidae, a bleak outlook once again threatens. Climate change is about to deal a double evolutionary deal on a group of Antarctic animals that have adapted well to the icy environment only to lose out to global warming.

New clues to animal climate change adaption

New clues to animal climate change adaption



Mummified 30,000-year-old bison bones have been used to help scientists discover clues about how animals adapt to rapid climate change.

Bushmeat in NYC!

Bushmeat in NYC!

Illegal wildlife products include live rats, chimpanzees and monkeys (bushmeat), but meat from these creatures is also imported. At risk of infecting humans are the RNA viruses, herpes viruses, retroviruses and many other potential health problems.

Colobus chorus

Colobus chorus



There is nothing more delightful than waking in South East Asian forests to the gibbon dawn chorus, but South America Howlers and African Colobus seem to compete more loudly. In an intriguing and difficult investigation by Anne Schel and Klaus Zuberbuhler, communication in animals reports a dawn chorus from insect, amphibian and bird.

Wildlife, Genes and Speciation Part II

Wildlife, Genes and Speciation Part II

The second part of The Earth Times coverage of the Conference of The Wildlife Society taking place in Waikoloa, Hawaii this week, written by Dave Armstrong.

Wildlife, Genes and Speciation Part I

Wildlife, Genes and Speciation Part I



In Waikoloa, Hawaii this week, there is the most remarkable collection of sessions and workshops. Whether eco-freak or mountain (wo)man, we can all regard with awe this mix of science, policy and wildlife management which is the US. Wildlife Society. This the first part of The Earth Times coverage of this event, written by Dave Armstrong.

East Winch'ed to Safety

East Winch'ed to Safety

East Winch Wildlife Centre in King's Lynn, Norfolk and three other RSPCA centres save thousands of animals at each location every year as RSPCA hospitals. Research on success of seal rehabilitation began with a desire to measure the effectiveness of returning the animal to the wild.

Zombie Worms Live

Zombie Worms Live

If you can keep out of sight, don't mind darkness and leave no trace when you're dead, you too could be a zombie worm. After a few million years, we now have a way to detect the presence of these intriguing animals on fossil whales - otherwise known as bone worms.

Wild Carpathia - Filming the Last Untouched European Wilderness

Wild Carpathia - Filming the Last Untouched European Wilderness

Documentary featuring Prince of Wales premieres on Travel Channel. Wild Carpathia is a stunning documentary about a little-known part of Europe. Romania has a huge virtually-untouched area of mountains almost the size of Britain.

Coyote cross breeding threatens wolf survival

Coyote cross breeding threatens wolf survival

Expanding across North America with European settlers, the coyote has helped push out the wolf population and now the animals are showing signs of cross breeding which could wipe out the genetically distinct wolf.

This week's top environment news stories: October 14th 2011

This week's top environment news stories: October 14th 2011

Top news headlines, stories and issues from the environment world this week up to October 14th 2011. Topics this week include conservation and wildlife in the UK, North Sea oil drilling, arctic ice and the oil spill in New Zealand.

Release the 'Kraken', well the Artistic Triassic Cephalopod

Release the 'Kraken', well the Artistic Triassic Cephalopod



A strange explanation is given for a puzzling arrangement of Triassic era fossils. It could seem strange to apply the word 'artistic' to a Triassic creature but an in-depth examination of Ichthyosaur fossils has renewed the general confusion about what happened to the animals on display at Nevada's Berlin-Ichthyosaur State Park.

A Wildlife Corridor Under Severe Threat in the Kilombero Valley, Tanzania

A Wildlife Corridor Under Severe Threat in the Kilombero Valley, Tanzania



The Kilombero Valley in Tanzania is home to over 350 species of plants and a wide variety animals, many of them endemic or threatened with extinction. It also contains an important bird community, including three endemic species, namely a weaver bird and two species of Cisticola.

Tasmanian Devils fight hardest battle yet

Tasmanian Devils fight hardest battle yet

The Tasmanian Devil, an animal with a ferocious reputation is fighting for its life against an infectious cancer that is now beyond culling control according to a new study. While culling of diseased livestock is a relatively common agricultural practice, it remains controversial where wild animals are concerned.

Green Light for Green States (can you Bear it?)

Green Light for Green States (can you Bear it?)



The journal Science has given US states the green light literally. Where any native species is not under any special protection, there is an obligation for conservation. Because wildlife is not owned, all citizens and therefore the State concerned must act, according to the public trust doctrine.

Nearly 400 aquatic species to be considered for protection under Endangered Species Act

Nearly 400 aquatic species to be considered for protection under Endangered Species Act

Nearly 400 species of southeastern U. S. aquatic plants and animals have been proposed for review by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, to determine if they warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act.

Act on rhino horn demand WWF tells Asian governments

Act on rhino horn demand WWF tells Asian governments

Action on rhino poaching in South Africa is putting more criminals behind bars for longer, but to protect these threatened animals, WWF says Asian governments need to act to cut demand too.

Visiting mosquitoes threaten Galapagos with deadly virus

Visiting mosquitoes threaten Galapagos with deadly virus

Scientists are worried that a disease that has caused damage to wildlife in North and South America could travel to the Galapagos Islands via mosquitoes hitching a ride with visiting boats and planes.

Award winning Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Park

Award winning Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Park

Award winning Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Park is not only a stunning place to enjoy your holiday but we have created a show case conservation project where we've set up a predator control programme without the use of poisons. This is a time consuming process but we've enjoyed the help of many young volunteers from all over the world.

Mountain butterflies provide rare glimpse of hybrid speciation

Mountain butterflies provide rare glimpse of hybrid speciation

Observant scientists have discovered a rare example of animal hybrid speciation, in the forests of the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States. The creature in question, the Appalachian tiger swallowtail butterfly (Papilio appalachiensis), is the genetically unique result of the union of two related butterflies.

Rhino horn use slammed by Chinese traditional medicinal practitioners

Rhino horn use slammed by Chinese traditional medicinal practitioners



Another important body in the Chinese medicinal community has come out strongly against the use of rhino horn in traditional remedies. The Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine has put out a statement condemning the practice, which may go a long way to shifting attitudes, and reducing demand for the horns of these endangered animals.

Wildlife and farmers - should we share or spare?

Wildlife and farmers - should we share or spare?



A paper out in Science suggests that both conservation and farming could benefit by living separately - while still being good neighbors. Sharing the same land in a more mixed landscape, by contrast, appears to leave wildlife and food harvests worse off in the long run, the team from the University of Cambridge and the RSPB conclude.

Twenty critically endangered Siamese crocodiles hatch in Lao PDR

Twenty critically endangered Siamese crocodiles hatch in Lao PDR

Researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society have good news about one of the world's rarest crocodiles. Twenty critically endangered Siamese crocodiles have hatched in a zoo in Lao PDR, representing a significant step in the successful conservation of this species.

Britain's most improved rivers revealed

Britain's most improved rivers revealed



The Environment Agency has named the top 10 most improved rivers in the country - changed from industrial dead zones to thriving wildlife habitats. Britain's rivers are the healthiest for over 20 years and otters, salmon and other wildlife are returning for the first time since the industrial revolution.

US landowners key to wildlife projects

US landowners key to wildlife projects

United States landowners have a key role to play in the protection of endangered American wildlife. That's one of the key messages to come out of the recent award by the US Government of $53m in grants to wildlife projects.

Clean-up for Lake Ellesmere, New Zealand's most polluted Lake

Clean-up for Lake Ellesmere, New Zealand's most polluted Lake



$11.6 million to clean-up Lake Ellesmere, the most polluted lake in New Zealand, but how effective will it be? Lake Ellesmere, in the Canterbury region of the South island and the fifth largest in the country was noted for the levels of pollution, damaging indigenous wildlife and its ecology, in a report last year.

Wildlife moving faster as the heat piles on

Wildlife moving faster as the heat piles on

A new study in Science shows that the natural world moving three times faster to the poles, away from the tropics, than expected. Climate change is blamed, say the researchers, and not all species can keep up at that rate.

WWF hits out at CITES closed door ivory talks

WWF hits out at CITES closed door ivory talks



WWF, the wildlife charity, says the decision by the body which monitors illegal trade in endangered species to close the doors on its discussions over the ivory trade risk harming the body's credibility.

Mekong river Irrawaddy dolphins face extinction

Mekong river Irrawaddy dolphins face extinction

The WWF is reporting that the Irrawaddy dolphin population in the Mekong river is on the verge of extinction. Irrawaddy dolphins could disappear from the Mekong river if action is not taken soon. That's the message from the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), having conducted 11 studies of dolphin populations in the area between 2007 and 2010.

Eradicating domestic cat populations for wildlife protection on Christmas Island

Eradicating domestic cat populations for wildlife protection on Christmas Island



Cats in the Australia shire of Christmas Island are now legally required to be de-sexed, tattooed, and micro-chipped for registration and further importation is no longer permitted. This is considered to be the first step in controlling the long-term impact of stray and feral cats for the protection of local wildlife.

Kangaroo Island - The Galapagos of Australia

Kangaroo Island - The Galapagos of Australia

A place to escape to, a place to see the beauty of the natural world; Kangaroo Island is a very special ecotourism destination. Words really do fail to describe the beauty of this island. Kangaroo Island, fondly known by many as the Galapagos of Australia, is a pristine wilderness that is home to a vast amount of animals that are native to Australia.

Trade in snakes, macaques, sharks out of control, CITES affirms

Trade in snakes, macaques, sharks out of control, CITES affirms

CITES convention examines effects of trade on at-risk species like long-tailed macaques, sharks, and several snake species. Unsustainable wildlife trade not only devastates local ecosystems, it also causes great suffering to individual animals and can introduce invasive species that damage ecosystems abroad.

The road to 'pollination heaven' is narrow - not broad

The road to 'pollination heaven' is narrow - not broad

A paper out in today's Current Biology has described how the path lined with gold - rich in natural resources - can distract animals from completing their journeys between fragments of endangered habitat. Sometimes it is better to lay paths narrow and rocky, to encourage pollinators, such as hoverflies, to keep moving between stranded natural habitats.

Conservation without borders - the future of global conservation initiatives

Conservation without borders - the future of global conservation initiatives

Cross-country conservation is the key to successful wildlife preservation. A new publication shows that conservation is most effective when it is carried out collaboratively, across country borders. Conservation projects involving neighbouring countries increase the benefits to wildlife and bring help to conserve large areas of natural habitats.

Snow Leopard spotted in Afghanistan

Snow Leopard spotted in Afghanistan

The Wildlife Conservation Society takes steps to protect a newly discovered population of snow leopards in Afghanistan. Snow leopards are doing well in a wild corner of war-torn Afghanistan according to the Wildlife Conservation Society published in the Journal of Environmental Studies.

Our Rivers campaign launches survey to identify best UK rivers for wildlife

Our Rivers campaign launches survey to identify best UK rivers for wildlife



A survey has been launched to identify the best rivers in the UK for wildlife, with support coming from a wide range of environmentalists including television broadcaster Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. The Our Rivers campaign, run by WWF, the RSPB, the Angling Trust and the Salmon & Trout Association, aims to assess the damage done to wildlife by the poor state of many rivers.

Bluefin tuna at 'risk of collapse' without drastic action

Bluefin tuna at 'risk of collapse' without drastic action



The first comprehensive assessment of tuna and billfish has put 5 of 8 tuna species on the Red List for threatened or endangered animals – and the IUCN is warning that Bluefin tuna are particularly vulnerable to vanishing, without the closure of fisheries. The report, out today in Science puts part of the blame on the higher prices of the remaining numbers of tuna and marlin.

Wildlife charity hits out a Conservative MEPs over CO2 target vote

Wildlife charity hits out a Conservative MEPs over CO2 target vote

British Conservative MEPs were instrumental in throwing out an EU report that goes against the wishes of their party's national government says WWF-UK. The European Parliament voted not to follow the recommendations of an EU report that called for a 30% reduction from 1990 levels in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020.

Conservation mission to save petrels on Henderson Island underway

Conservation mission to save petrels on Henderson Island underway



Rats to be eradicated from unique bird sanctuary in remote part of the globe. Britain's Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) in partnership with the US Fish & Wildlife Service and other nature conservancy projects is funding a world-leading mission to Henderson Island in the Pitcairn Islands.

Minuscule water boatman boasts loudest shout of them all

Minuscule water boatman boasts loudest shout of them all

A minute species of water boatman has been shown to be able to 'turn up the volume to 11', and so out-shout all other animals in the noise-making department, according to a study being presented the Society for Experimental Biology annual conference. At 99 decibels, the mating call of Micronecta scholtzi blasts out louder than elephant or whale, when body weight is taken into consideration.

Letting London's parks grow wild again key to bringing back wildlife

Letting London's parks grow wild again key to bringing back wildlife

Central London's birding expert talks conservation, kestrels and keeping the public happy as he takes The Earth Times on a wildlife-themed tour of Regent's Park. Arguably the last place you'd think of if you were asked to name London's top havens for birds but the figures don't lie: last year alone, some 124 species of birds were spotted either just feeding or nesting in the Royal Park, among them ospreys, little owls common terns and peregrine falcons.

Biodiversity Research Institute studies wind turbine dangers to wildlife

Biodiversity Research Institute studies wind turbine dangers to wildlife



Careful location of renewable energy developments may reduce impacts on birds and bats. Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI) has established a new wildlife and renewable energy program to study and understand the movements of birds and bats and to assess the potential interactions between energy facilities and wildlife.

Good news for wildlife in Afghanistan

Good news for wildlife in Afghanistan

Despite a decade of conflict in Afghanistan, the country's wildlife is holding on. A new survey carried out by Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) scientists has shown that large mammals are surviving in some areas of Afghanistan after ten years of conflict.

New map tracks protected fish and wildlife

New map tracks protected fish and wildlife



Online resource provides mapping tool to see where protected fish and wildlife live and blossom. A new interactive map has gone live online in Washington helping to keep track of populations of fish and wildlife deemed to be at risk of changing habitat and falling numbers.

Act now to prime the green growth pump says WWF

Act now to prime the green growth pump says WWF

Governments need to act quickly and in concert to direct private enterprise towards the clean technologies needed for a greener future says world wildlife charity. Enabling the Transition - Climate Innovation Systems for a Low Carbon Future, calls for concerted action from governments, working together to back the private sector in developing clean technologies.

Save the old men of the forest to house the forest's young

Save the old men of the forest to house the forest's young



An old tree can support dozens of different nesting animals and birds who don't have the woodpecker's powers. Trees are a good thing for the environment right? Well, yes, but replacing old with new is bad news for a multitude of creatures that rely on the ravages of time to help them make a home in the trees.

Kill ship speed not whales, say wildlife conservation groups

Kill ship speed not whales, say wildlife conservation groups

Whales swimming near the Californian coast have increasingly become victims of hit-and-sail accidents, as shipping crowds into the important marine sanctuaries there. Now conservation groups have filed a petition with the US Department of Commerce, asking for a speed limit to halt the sea-lane carnage.

Airports play their part to protect wildlife

Airports play their part to protect wildlife



Several US airports are taking steps to ensure that they protect precious wildlife habitats at times when they are making increasing demands on land. The latest one to be recognised is the St. Lucie County International Airport, which was awarded the Regional Director's Conservation Award from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region.

New technology to transform India's Project Tiger

New technology to transform India's Project Tiger



Tools helping to map the tiger's habitat and protect numbers. Project Tiger is run by Indian wildlife and forest management officials. Its aim to produce a 'tiger atlas' alongside a 'tiger habitat population evaluation system'.

Texas Park and Wildlife Department goes solar

Texas Park and Wildlife Department goes solar

The department tasked with protecting the Texan environment is doing its bit to reduce its own impact by installing solar power at many sites, the scheme also hopes to inspire others to follow their lead.

The Good Fish Guide makes choosing sustainable fish easy

The Good Fish Guide makes choosing sustainable fish easy

Help safeguard the future of fish and other marine wildlife by using the Marine Conservation Society's Good Fish Guide. It can be overwhelming keeping up with all the changes needed to support a more sustainable and environmentally friendly future, but the Marine Conservation Society has made it a little bit easier.

First Canadian city bans shark fin trade

First Canadian city bans shark fin trade

The city of Brantford, Ontario, has captured the attention of the world by becoming the first city in Canada to call a halt to the trade in shark fins. The World Wildlife Fund estimates that around 73 million sharks are killed every year, mostly for their fins. The majority of the fins are taken using barbaric methods where the shark is thrown back into the ocean alive and without its fin.

Plan aims to manage white nose syndrome across borders

Plan aims to manage white nose syndrome across borders

A new plan released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service aims to coordinate management of white nose syndrome, a deadly disease killing bats. The plan provides a framework for investigating and responding to white nose syndrome, outlining who is responsible for which activities, and how they will coordinate their efforts.

Water and wildlife at risk from sweeping changes to forest rule, say top scientists

Water and wildlife at risk from sweeping changes to forest rule, say top scientists

A bold vision for U.S. forests, but scientists are worried. After a 90 day public review period, more than 300,000 comments from people across the U.S. have urged the administration to develop a more direct policy on how to manage national forests.

China and U.S. announce fisheries and climate change deals

China and U.S. announce fisheries and climate change deals

The world's two largest economies have announced cooperation on fisheries and greenhouse gases. They hope to stop unregulated fish stocks from going on sale, monitor the management of threatened species and to reduce the toll of protected marine animals like sea turtles.

Lone Male Black Bears Responsible for Most Attacks on Humans

Lone Male Black Bears Responsible for Most Attacks on Humans

Predatory male black bears are responsible for more deaths than female bears. An article in the Journal of Wildlife Management reports that the majority of fatal bear attacks on people are carried out by lone male black bears. Perhaps more significantly, the report also suggests that these attacks are on the increase.

WSC wades in to stop US bog turtle decline

WSC wades in to stop US bog turtle decline

Bog turtles, tiny fen-dwelling reptiles found at scattered sites in the north-east and eastern US, are being hit by a mysterious decline in numbers. Now the Wildlife Conservation Society (WSC) has partnered with other wildlife agencies to track the scope of the problem, and try and find out why North America's smallest turtle is coming under renewed threat.

2011 State of Birds Report

2011 State of Birds Report



''This year's report brings attention to the importance of public lands and waters for conserving America's wildlife and habitats.'' The recent release of the 2011 State of Birds report has given new insight into the welfare of America's bird populations, as well as the status of wildlife and conservation efforts.

Gray wolves lose protection in US states

Gray wolves lose protection in US states



Gray wolves have lost their protection in parts of the United States after their numbers made a recovery, a move that means they can be hunted again. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has removed Endangered Species Act protection from gray wolves in the northern Rocky Mountains, including Idaho, Montana, eastern Oregon and Washington, and northern Utah.

Warning about forestry loss

Warning about forestry loss

Wildlife pressure group WWF has warned that more than 230 million hectares of forest could disappear by 2050. The Living Forests Report argues that policymakers and businesses should unite around a goal of zero net deforestation and forest degradation by 2020.

Humpback whales in super-aggregation in Antarctica

Humpback whales in super-aggregation in Antarctica



In a wildlife spectacle, a massive aggregation of over 300 humpback whales followed the biggest swarm of Antarctic krill seen in twenty years into bays in the Western Antarctic peninsula. The humpbacks were gorging on swarms of the tiny shrimp-like crustaceans. Almost all life in the Southern Ocean is ultimately dependent on the protein-rich crustaceans, from seabirds, seals and penguins, to the filter feeding whales.

US wolves to be hunted again

US wolves to be hunted again

In historic move on Friday, the US Fish and Wildlife service removed endangered species status protection from gray wolves in five US rocky mountain states. Wolf hunts are already planned in Montana and Idaho, where the animals are blamed for attacking livestock, and a decline in elk numbers.

Greenpeace: Oceans Still in Peril, Hope on the Horizon

Greenpeace: Oceans Still in Peril, Hope on the Horizon

According to an April 2011 report released by Greenpeace, the earth's oceans are in jeopardy due to the devastating effects of overfishing and bycatch. DThe report's findings indicate that careless industrial fishing practices continue to be a large part of our ocean's troubles, and are now responsible for reducing populations of ecologically vital animals like cod, sharks and tuna by up to 90 percent.

Gulf Wildlife and Wetlands Vulnerable, says NWF

Gulf Wildlife and Wetlands Vulnerable, says NWF

With the one-year anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon Gulf oil spill disaster looming in the near future, the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) has released a report written by senior scientist Dr. Doug Inkley that details the current state of both the wildlife and the wetlands in the region. Although the report's findings indicate that some species have begun to show signs of recovery, many others are still in peril and will require the help of legislators, conservation groups, scientists and regulatory bodies in order to survive.

Is Brazil's Cerrado the ''ugly duckling'' of conservation?

Is Brazil's Cerrado the ''ugly duckling'' of conservation?

A renewed campaign to encourage consumers and campaigners to save the Cerrado, being destroyed twice as fast as the Amazon Rainforest. Because of a generation of destroying the land to plant crops for European consumers, and eradication of wildlife and plant life at twice the rate of that in the Amazon Rainforest, conservationists fear it could disappear within two decades.

£100 million investment for UK river wildlife

£100 million investment for UK river wildlife

New funding to clean rivers and waterways to boost wildlife. The funding represents the start of a four year programme to tackle pollution, invasive weeds and removing redundant man-made structures like dams and weirs that inhibit the growth and development of natural wildlife.

Climate change 'poses threat to caribou'

Climate change 'poses threat to caribou'



Melting sea ice, brought about by climate change, could be forcing two species of caribou nearer to extinction, according to wildlife campaigners. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has responded to the claims about the Peary caribou and the Barren-ground Caribou by launching a review of their status.

Bats show gender differences are important in conservation

Bats show gender differences are important in conservation



Conservationists may be taking a second look at how close to extinction some animals are, thanks to scientists who have spotted important differences between how male and female bats feed. They found that female bats feed in completely different areas to males. The females prefer to hunt specifically in aquatic habitats, such as lakes and marshes, but males hunt in a broad range of areas, including rivers, cities and farmland.

Chantelle Houghton dresses in lettuce for PETA campaign

Chantelle Houghton dresses in lettuce for PETA campaign

Chantelle Houghton appeared dressed as a salad in London last Thursday (24.03.11) to promote the vegetarian lifestyle. The former 'Big Brother' contestant and model wore only lettuce leaves styled into a dress to front a campaign by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, encouraging the public to stop eating meat.

Dolphins evolving into groups separated by ocean conditions

Dolphins evolving into groups separated by ocean conditions

New techniques have shown that groups of dolphins are separated by environmental factors which are starting to produce new species. Conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, and other conservation and research groups found that currents are among the factors preventing dolphin mixing in the western Indian Ocean.

Skinny worms provide new approach for obesity drugs

Skinny worms provide new approach for obesity drugs

Chemicals tested on worms may be of use in human medicines say a team of American researchers, and it's a major breakthrogh in designing new drugs. Scientists at the University of California, San Francisco have found a new way to understand human obesity in the unlikeliest of animals - the traditionally long and thin worm.

Climate Change Has Huge Effect On Birdlife

Climate Change Has Huge Effect On Birdlife

Climate change is having a bigger effect than previously thought on bird species. There is no doubt that climate change is affecting many ecological events, such as flowering and reproduction seasons in animals. In the case of birdlife, there is growing evidence that this effect is particularly profound.

From garbage tip to wildlife haven - new theory for Everglades tree islands

From garbage tip to wildlife haven - new theory for Everglades tree islands



Human waste-tips some 5,000 years ago helped to build south Florida's tree-islands, new research being presented at today's American Geophysical Union's Chapman Conference shows. As the waste piled up, the ground became raised enough for trees to colonize - and then stabilize - these island wildlife sanctuaries in the Everglades' Shark River Slough.

Crackdown on illegal bear trade and horrific bear bile spectacle

Crackdown on illegal bear trade and horrific bear bile spectacle

Wildlife campaigners have welcomed a decision by the Vietnamese government to crack down on the illegal extraction of bear bile for tourists. The news comes after the World Society for the Protection of Animals' (WSPA) recently published a report highlighting the practice, which occurs because the bile has medicinal applications.

Stricken ship threatens environmental disaster, putting endangered wildlife at risk

Stricken ship threatens environmental disaster, putting endangered wildlife at risk



The wreckage of a cargo vessel that has grounded off a South Atlantic Island is causing an impending environmental disaster, threatening one of the world's most endangered penguins. 1500 tonnes of heavy crude oil has spilled into the sea.

Animals help increase diversity of plant life in forested areas of France

Animals help increase diversity of plant life in forested areas of France

Although large animals in French forests are responsible for a certain amount of damage, they also are effective in contributing to plant diversity. They discovered that one plant, the gypsy flower, was not found at the time of the original survey and only began to appear in 1981. It is now widespread, particularly in areas most frequented by large forest mammals.

Zoos being urged to breed endangered species

Zoos being urged to breed endangered species



Zoos around the world are being asked to team up to shelter and breed endangered animals as a form of biodiversity insurance. The research found that between 20 and 25 percent of endangered species of mammals are already kept at the zoos and just a slightly lower figure for birds. However, the concern is that the species that are facing an acute risk of extinction are not so well represented.

Not just a pretty face: adult Barbary macaques recognise photos of friends

Not just a pretty face: adult Barbary macaques recognise photos of friends

According to new research, untrained Barbary macaques are able to differentiate between pictures of familiar and unfamiliar faces. Scientists discovered that the monkeys were able recognise photographs of group members, and spent more time studying pictures of animals that were not part of their social circle.

Eat an apple a day ... really

Eat an apple a day ... really



Chinese scientists report that eating apples extended the lifespan of test animals by 10%. Apples are traditionally associated with health. Most of us will be familiar with the saying, said to originate in 19th century Wales, that ''an apple a day keeps the doctor away''. Many of us will also be familiar with Prince Ahmed's apple in Tales of the Arabian Nights that was said to be ''the cure for every disorder.''

Join in with National Wildlife Week

Join in with National Wildlife Week

Celebrate U.S. flora and fauna during National Wildlife Week, 14-20 March. ''Walk, Climb, Run and Leap your way into celebrating National Wildlife Week!'' That's the message from the National Wildlife Foundation. They want Americans to get out and celebrate the amazing wildlife diversity in their country, whether it's panthers in Florida or monk seals in Hawaii.

Pollution driving sea stars to evolve apart

Pollution driving sea stars to evolve apart

Description: Sea stars are among marine animals being fenced off genetically by plumes of pollution flowing into the sea. That's the conclusion of a genetic study on Californian sea stars by a pair of scientists at the University of Hawaii. Filed in enviromental issues: pollution/conservation.

Mum at 60 - oldest bird in the U.S. has a chick

Mum at 60 - oldest bird in the U.S. has a chick



Spring is sprung, the grass is green and a 60 year old albatross has a new addition to her brood! At 60 years old, Wisdom, a Laysan albatross, is the oldest wild bird known in the U.S. First recorded in 1956 as she incubated an egg, Wisdom has seen it all - from the first man on the moon, to the fall of the Berlin Wall and beyond. Filed under environmental issues: Wildlife/Nature.

Pamela Anderson campaigns for animal rights in Israel

Pamela Anderson campaigns for animal rights in Israel



Pamela Anderson has travelled to Israel to discuss animal rights in the nation. The former 'Baywatch' actress - who is a worldwide ambassador for the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) organisation - praised the Israeli people for their "progressive" views on animal rights activism.

Lions under growing threat from U.S. hunters

Lions under growing threat from U.S. hunters

American trophy hunters are an increasing threat to lions, a coalition of wildlife charities reports. The coalition of wildlife charities demonstrated that trophy hunting by U.S. hunters is a serious and growing threat to African lions. They state that between 1998 and 2008, 64 per cent of wild lions traded international for trophy hunting were imported to the U.S.

Endangered Great hammerhead sharks tracked into the north Atlantic

Endangered Great hammerhead sharks tracked into the north Atlantic



Endangered Great hammerhead sharks have been tracked by satellite into the North Atlantic for the first time by scientists at the University of Miami. The animals are under threat from shark finning operations who prize them for their large fins.

Worrying news for critically endangered Siberian tigers

Worrying news for critically endangered Siberian tigers

The critically endangered Siberian tiger has an effective population of just 14 animals - that's the worrying conclusion of a recent study into these stunning cats. The Siberian tiger, also known as the Amur tiger, is the world's largest cat. Previously it ranged far across northern China, Korea and south eastern Russia. In the early 20th Century the Siberian tiger was driven close to extinction through poaching and habitat loss and was wiped out from 90% of its once large range.

Smithsonian Wild website gathers images of nature uncut

Smithsonian Wild website gathers images of nature uncut

A new site from the Smitsonian, called Smithsonian WILD, gives public access to hundreds of thousands of wildlife research images from around the world. The Smithsonian has collected over 202,000 striking images from wildlife researchers around the globe in a new publicly accessible collection.

Further Wildlife Deaths Linked To Gulf Oil Spill

Further Wildlife Deaths Linked To Gulf Oil Spill

Almost a year later, the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is still affecting wildlife. An unusual increase in the mortality rate among dolphins on the Alabama and Mississippi coasts is being reported this week. At least 24 dolphins have died since the beginning of the year, the majority of which have been infant dolphins, either aborted or stillborn during the calving season.

Multi-million dollar fund announced for US wildlife projects

Multi-million dollar fund announced for US wildlife projects

The longstanding connection between nature conservation and hunting and fishing in the US has been confirmed with the announcement of a $749 million fund for wildlife projects. US Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said that the money was coming from excise tax revenues generated by sportsmen and women and would go to state and territorial fish and wildlife agencies.

Elephant numbers on the increase in Kenya

Elephant numbers on the increase in Kenya

A real conservation success story, a new elephant census in Kenya's Tsavo ecosystem shows numbers increasing despite ivory poaching and a prolonged drought in the area. The Earth Times spoke to Patrick Omondi, senior assistant director of Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), who co-ordinated the elephant census, which is held every three years.

Africa urged to come together to protect migratory birds

Africa urged to come together to protect migratory birds

The migratory map of Africa is tipped to change significantly over the next few decades as birds react to the effects of climate change. The Finnish ornithologist Johannes Leche is widely credited with undertaking the first proper study of the migratory patterns of birds, with his pioneering work in the mid-18th century based largely upon the technique of ringing individual animals.

Nations 'need to work together' to save wildlife

Nations 'need to work together' to save wildlife

Countries will have to improve their co-operation if they are to protect endangered wildlife in an age of climate change, according to an international study. A team of scientists have come up with a conservation index designed to help policy-makers to deal with the effects of climate change on birds in Africa, the theory of which could help governments across the world as climate change forces species to move to new areas.

England's most-important natural refuges identified

England's most-important natural refuges identified



A handful of unremarkable spots are serving as valuable refuges for England's rarest species, a new report has revealed. England's rarest species of animals are not majestic eagles or regal deer, nor are the country's most important natural sites to be found in any of the popular National Parks. Instead, the rarest plants and animals are to be found - usually with a magnifying glass - in some of less presupposing parts of this green and pleasant land.

The impact of oxygen-poor oceans on the early evolution of animals

The impact of oxygen-poor oceans on the early evolution of animals

How fluctuations in levels of oceanic oxygen affected the early evolution of animal life. The accepted view of the Earth's history is that for its first four billion years it was in an anoxic state and that about 600 million years ago the oceans became oxygen-rich to approximately the degree that they are today.

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog

Chaser the Super Smart Wonder Dog



Chaser is a super smart border collie who can recognise and understand the names of 1022 objects. Many readers will have seen or read of amazing animals who can count, or respond to complex commands. Most of these are the result of simple stage tricks, but researchers at South Carolina's prestigious Wofford College have Chaser the Wonder Dog.

Good clean water as UK rivers enjoyed great decade

Good clean water as UK rivers enjoyed great decade

The UK's rivers have enjoyed a great decade. The Environment Agency want this to continue. The UK's Environment Agency has defined the last decade as 'the best for rivers since the industrial revolution'. With dramatic improvements in water quality and the general environment around rivers the results have been seen in the recovery of wildlife in the British countryside.

Saving the Jaguar

Saving the Jaguar

A campaign has been launched to save the jaguar in Northern Mexico and parts of south-western United States where its numbers are endangered. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will develop a plan to preserve habitats, starting with research into numbers and distribution of the animals, about which very little is known. A Jaguar Recovery Team has been assembled

US Carvers Creek State wildlife park continues to expand

US Carvers Creek State wildlife park continues to expand



A collaboration between conservationists and the Military has led to the expansion of an American park being managed for tourism and wildlife. International conservation organisation The Nature Conservancy has recently transferred almost 3,000 acres of land in Harnett and Cumberland counties to help Carvers Creek State Park continue to grow. That takes to 4,181 acres the amount of land protected by the organisation in the two counties.

The effects of a colder Bering Sea on the feeding habits of pollock

The effects of a colder Bering Sea on the feeding habits of pollock

A three-year dip in Bering Sea temperature has caused a change in the distribution of the staple food of pollock. The Bering Sea is considered to be one of the world's most productive fisheries and its northern portions are the home of sea ducks, grey whales, bearded seals and walruses, but a 30-year warming trend has been bad news for those animals that are adapted to a cold-water environment, causing them to migrate further north.

Scientists track leatherback turtle travels for the first time

Scientists track leatherback turtle travels for the first time



Satellite tracking technology has helped British scientists map the route taken by female leatherhead turtles for the first time. The marked decline seen in global populations of leatherback turtles can be partly attributed to the fact that their annual migratory routes force the animals to run the gauntlet of long-line fishing boats in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

Horses: Cruel victims of lucrative drug trade

Horses: Cruel victims of lucrative drug trade



Paying the price of the Mexican drug smuggling, horses. Young horses are used to carry drugs across the border into the US and are left to fend for themselves. These animals die out of neglect. They are often founds half starved and hurt wandering around open to more injury and harm. Activists often find 15 to 20 horses a month.

Earth Times Meets Cryptozoologist Karl Shuker

Earth Times Meets Cryptozoologist Karl Shuker

Cryptozoology is the study of 'hidden' animals. Those animals that have never previously been recognised by the scientific community and rediscovered animals that were thought to be extinct but show up again, often unexpectedly, in their original habitat.

Experience the Wild Wonders of Europe in stunning photographs

Experience the Wild Wonders of Europe in stunning photographs

Win a beautiful book as a prize in Earthtimes' first competition. Wild Wonders of Europe is the world's biggest nature photography conservation project ever. Sixty-nine top nature photographers were sent on 125 assignments to 48 countries, visiting nature reserves.

Dolphins in rehab get hearing tests

Dolphins in rehab get hearing tests



Most years about 4000 marine mammals beach on US coasts and the causes are often hard to determine. New research in Florida tested the hearing of beached or net-entangled animals that survived, and found that almost 60% of stranding bottlenose dolphins were severely or profoundly deaf.

Tracking down the elephant poachers

Tracking down the elephant poachers

A new tool could help wildlife crime officers worldwide to trace the origin of illegally traded elephant ivory. German scientists, in cooperation with WWF are building a database that will pinpoint the specific origin of illegal ivory.

Larger predators at greatest risk from environmental changes

Larger predators at greatest risk from environmental changes

Animals such as polar bears and tigers will be worst-hit by the environmental changes caused by habitat destruction, new research warns. Arguing that their findings could have important implications for global efforts to protect larger predatory animals, the likes of the polar bear and the tiger could be hit the hardest by ongoing changes to the Earth's climate.

Tackling Global Wildlife Crime

Tackling Global Wildlife Crime

At this week's International Tiger Forum in Saint Petersburg an important alliance was formed that will help not just tigers but a range of endangered species across the globe. A Letter of Understanding signed at the Forum brings into effect the International Consortium on Combating Wildlife Crime (ICCWC).

Past decade sees over 1000 tigers killed in continued illegal trade

Past decade sees over 1000 tigers killed in continued illegal trade

More than 1000 tigers have been reduced to skin and bone in continued illegal trade over the last decade according to Traffic, the wildlife trade monitoring organisation. Their report was released on the eve of a tiger summit to be hosted by Vladimir Putin in St Petersburg next week which will be attended by representatives from all tiger range countries.