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Cancer

Skin cancer selected our ancestors?

Skin cancer selected our ancestors?



We can't find the fossils and the genome can give only some hints. How did the first human-like species survive and why did they have to be black. Mel Greaves has the answers.

World Cancer Day - 4th February 2013

 World Cancer Day - 4th February 2013

Although medical advances and understanding of the causes of cancer have made it less of a killer than it used to be,it is estimated that during the current year the worldwide death toll from cancer will reach 8 million. The majority of these cases are in the developing world.

Tanning beds 'can cause non-melanoma skin cancer'

Tanning beds 'can cause non-melanoma skin cancer'

Using indoor tanning beds can cause non-melanoma skin cancer, the most common human skin cancer, according to a new study.

Lung cancer tumours in smokers have 10-times more genetic mutations

Lung cancer tumours in smokers have 10-times more genetic mutations

Lung cancer sufferers with a history of smoking have 10-times more genetic mutations in their tumours than non-smokers with the disease, according to a new study.

Evolution in medicine - Part II

Evolution in medicine - Part II

The medical connection to evolution is further explained by reference to ageing and immortality. Stephen Searle explains how cancer is evolving and why treatment should change in its emphasis A section on various pathogens intriguingly connects to his previous section on how early humans gained immunity from parasites, then concludes on how to integrate all such ongoing information into medical courses.

Cancer risk fails to motivate overweight Brits into losing weight

Cancer risk fails to motivate overweight Brits into losing weight

The increased risk of developing cancer is not enough to make overweight Britons slim down and the main problem is lack of willpower, says new research from Cancer Research UK.

Exercise and caffeine 'prevent skin cancer'

 Exercise and caffeine 'prevent skin cancer'

Exercise and caffeine can help prevent skin cancer, a top cancer charity has been told at its annual meeting.

Breast cancer and the environment

Breast cancer and the environment

A review of research on environmental risk factors for breast cancer. These days, all over the world and in the United States in particular, breast cancer is one of the most common health risks for women.

The drawback of eating starch

The drawback of eating starch



The link between starch intake levels and risk for breast cancer recurrence. So many different factors go into the development of breast cancer: physiological changes; environmental factors; genetic predisposition.

Early Detection of COPD could help prevent lung cancer

Early Detection of COPD could help prevent lung cancer

Detection of COPD could allow for the early detection of lung cancer. The term COPD covers various diseases of the lungs which cause airway obstruction and narrowing. The most common are chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

Men, women and oral contraception

Men, women and oral contraception



New research on female use of contraceptives and its possible connection to male prostate cancer.

A new technology to help combat breast cancer

A new technology to help combat breast cancer

The development of C-Path, a computerized diagnostic tool to help combat breast cancer. The full research paper will be published today in Science Transitional Medicine, outlining a breakthrough in the symptom diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

Screening could cut bowel cancer deaths by a quarter, says study

Screening could cut bowel cancer deaths by a quarter, says study



Bowel cancer deaths fell by 27 per cent after Scottish patients took part in a home screening test, a National Cancer body's annual conference heard.

Tasmanian Devils fight hardest battle yet

Tasmanian Devils fight hardest battle yet

The Tasmanian Devil, an animal with a ferocious reputation is fighting for its life against an infectious cancer that is now beyond culling control according to a new study. While culling of diseased livestock is a relatively common agricultural practice, it remains controversial where wild animals are concerned.

Worried about prostate

Worried about prostate

UCLA has researched one of those worrying areas in life, for men at least. Over 75 years old, they reckon, and you may have your prostate cancer neglected by doctors. The researchers studied men with only one different comorbid disease alongside those with no other condition.

Experts call for equal access to cancer care worldwide

Experts call for equal access to cancer care worldwide



At the 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, held this week in Berlin, scientists from the Lancet Oncology Commission delivered a manifesto of sorts, calling on global officials to implement radical changes in the way cancer care is handled, in an effort to improve affordability and access to cancer care for all people.

First 'green Nobel' winner, Wangari Maathai dies

First 'green Nobel' winner, Wangari Maathai dies

Environmental campaigner dies after battle with cancer. The environmental campaigner, political conscience and winner of the first 'green Nobel', Wangari Maathai, has died. She was 71 and was suffering from cancer.

Tumour aggression linked to breast cancer patients' stress

Tumour aggression linked to breast cancer patients' stress



Researchers say they have found a link between stress levels in newly-diagnosed breast cancer sufferers and the aggression of their tumours. Women from ethnic minorities are most likely to suffer in this way says the report.

Spice up your broccoli to help cancer fight

Spice up your broccoli to help cancer fight

Many spicy foods contain an enzyme which not only makes your broccoli more palatable but also boosts its cancer-fighting properties. To get the best out of your broccoli you should cook it as little as possible - steaming for two to four minutes according to our scientific experts.

Fish oil supplements 'should not be used' by those on chemo

Fish oil supplements 'should not be used' by those on chemo



A study published today in Cancer Cell is recommending that widely-used fish-oil supplements – prized for their high omega-3 and -6 contents - should not be taken by those undergoing chemotherapy. Although these remain a healthy option for those suffering from cancer, they appear to halt the effects of chemotherapy, and may play a role in developing chemotherapy resistance.

Virus shrinks cancer cells

Virus shrinks cancer cells

Engineered viruses can be successfully infused into a cancer patient's body to selectively infect and shrink cancer cells, researchers show. Twenty-three advanced-cancer patients who had failed to respond to available treatments were infused with an engineered strain of vaccinia virus.

New initiative for early diagnosis of genetic colorectal cancer

New initiative for early diagnosis of genetic colorectal cancer

A new early diagnosis program for the family members of patients diagnosed with Lynch syndrome has been launched in Texas. UT Southwestern and Parkland Memorial Hospital have teamed up to offer a new screening program for families thought to be at risk from colorectal cancer.

Could the ecstasy drug be used to treat cancer?

Could the ecstasy drug be used to treat cancer?

Scientists at the University of Birmingham believe that a modified version of the 'dance' drug, ecstasy, could be effective at treating blood cancers. MDMA could be used to target leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma after researchers at the University of Birmingham ran tests showing that modifying the active ingredient in the drug, MDMA, boosted its cancer-killing properties.

Early morning smokers at higher cancer risk

Early morning smokers at higher cancer risk



Smokers who light up as soon as they wake are more addicted to their habit and more at risk from associated cancers says new research published by the American Cancer Society. Those who lit up a cigarette between 31 and 60 minutes after waking were 1.31 times more likely to develop lung cancer as those who waited for an hour.

How the genes of Cedric and Spirit can help save the Tasmanian devils

How the genes of Cedric and Spirit can help save the Tasmanian devils

Tasmanian devils, the pug-shaped ferocious predators of the marsupial world, are under mortal threat from a face-eating cancer. But ground-breaking new genetic research, online now in the latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is helping conservationists to form a plan to protect the last of the big carnivorous marsupials.

'Map-reading' for male mice falls foul of BPA

'Map-reading' for male mice falls foul of BPA

Bisphenol A (BPA) - a widely-used chemical that has been connected to health worries over cancer, heart disease, and hormone disruption - has left male deer-mice unable to find, or impress, the ladies. The research, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences adds credence to concerns that mothers and infants exposed to BPA in the womb may suffer from reproductive and behavioral knock-ons.

Perils of a sunny lifestyle

Perils of a sunny lifestyle

A sunnier world encourages young people to expose more skin. This increases the risk of malignant melanoma skin cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recently reported on two studies using new drugs to prolong the life of those with advanced melanomas.

Children's cancers decoded

Children's cancers decoded

A computational method that can identify cancer-causing genetic errors has been reported by the Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, a joint effort of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Tennessee and Washington University.

Cancer threat from mobile phone use is real

Cancer threat from mobile phone use is real



World Health Organisation confirms link between mobile phones and cancer. The research could lead to the United Nations revisiting its guidelines on mobile phone usage. In the meantime, the World Health Organisation suggests users take protective action by limiting usage and using headsets.

Protein responsible for drug resistance in breast cancer found

Protein responsible for drug resistance in breast cancer found

Scientists are looking for ways to block a protein that helps breast cancers become resistant to drug treatments. It is thought that the protein, known as LMTK3, will now become a target for new breast cancer treatments.

Lower incidence of prostate cancer in coffee drinkers

Lower incidence of prostate cancer in coffee drinkers



Men who drink more coffee could be at less risk from prostate cancer. The study, which focussed on a group of 50,000 men, found that those who drank six or more cups of coffee per day were 20% less like to contract prostate cancer than those who didn't drink coffee.

US Government dedicates day to skin cancer education

US Government dedicates day to skin cancer education

The Environmental Protection Agency has named the Friday before Memorial Day Don't Fry Day in an effort to educate Americans about the dangers of skin cancer, now the most common cancer in the states.

Yoga boosts women in recovery from breast cancer treatment

Yoga boosts women in recovery from breast cancer treatment



Yoga doesn't just keep mind and body fit - it can aid recovery from stressful treatments such as radiation therapy. So says a new study on the benefits of yoga for women undergoing breast cancer treatment - to be presented at June's meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The meditative aspect of yoga has a crucial part to play in enhancing women's health, lowering their stress, and improving their mental outlook.

Stem cell research: Two steps forward, one step back

Stem cell research: Two steps forward, one step back

A flurry of stem cell research brings us closer to stem cell therapies for cancer and other degenerative diseases. In a stem cell step forward, Christine Chaffer and colleages at the Whitehead Institute overturned a long-held belief that cell differentiation only moves forward - that is stem cells become specific cell types, but not the other way around.

Marine organism reveals hidden secrets that could help fight disease

Marine organism reveals hidden secrets that could help fight disease

Potentially beneficial bacteria has genome sequenced. The research has groundbreaking implications for treatments of several human diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. This follows on from recent research which shows that L. majuscula produces substances potentially useful in fighting these human diseases.

Can nutrition alone reverse established cancers?

Can nutrition alone reverse established cancers?

A reputed nutritionist and biochemist says changes in diet can cause cancers to regress. We know that following a healthy diet can help prevent certain forms of cancer, just as an unhealthy diet can promote cancer. It has also been shown that a radical change of diet will help in the fight against established cancer when used in combination with traditional treatments, but can nutrition alone reverse cancer?

Tweaking a natural chemical produces anti-cancer drugs

Tweaking a natural chemical produces anti-cancer drugs

Young UK scientists find a way of tweaking chemical structures of molecules from deepsea sponges to make anti-cancer drugs. A report in a recent edition of Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry, the journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry, described how a young scientist from Imperial College London had been awarded a grant of £106,079 to investigate naturally occurring chemicals found in sea sponges in an effort to find out more about anti-cancer drugs.

Passive smoking a killer with children smoked out in cars

Passive smoking a killer with children smoked out in cars



Passive smoking, where non-smokers breathe in the second-hand smoke of others took a little longer to be recognised. After the popular British entertainer Roy Castle died in 1994 from lung cancer caused by passive smoking, people generally began to take notice. Although he had never smoked, Roy Castle had spent much of his life working in smoky clubs.

Watch Your Drink, Hexavalent Chromium found in some Tap Water

Watch Your Drink, Hexavalent Chromium found in some Tap Water

The Environmental Working Group of Washington, D.C. in a report released this morning has said that drinking water from taps in America isn't not safe. The laboratory tests, they conducted found very high levels of cancer-causing chemical hexavalent chromium in tap water in 31 U.S. cities, including Bend.