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Conservation News

Cocaine production spells doom for Colombia's rainforests

Cocaine production spells doom for Colombia's rainforests

Posted Wed, 16 Feb 2011 11:00:01 GMT by Michael Evans

Colombian rainforests under threat due to an increase in production of coca to meet world demand for cocaine. More than 1,821 species of birds, 623 species of amphibians, 467 species of mammals, 518 species of reptiles and 3,200 species of fish are found, mainly in the country's vast tracts of tropical forest.

Cocaine production spells doom for Colombia's rainforests

Elephant numbers on the increase in Kenya

Elephant numbers on the increase in Kenya

Posted Tue, 15 Feb 2011 17:18:00 GMT by Louise Murray

A real conservation success story, a new elephant census in Kenya's Tsavo ecosystem shows numbers increasing despite ivory poaching and a prolonged drought in the area. The Earth Times spoke to Patrick Omondi, senior assistant director of Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), who co-ordinated the elephant census, which is held every three years.

Elephant numbers on the increase in Kenya

Trade in bushmeat decimating Tanzanian forests

Trade in bushmeat decimating Tanzanian forests

Posted Tue, 15 Feb 2011 13:27:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

Bushmeat taken from one of the most threatened forests in the world is placing significant pressure on the Udzungwa forest species and ecosystems. In Tanzania, international and local environmentalists have just released a new report which confirms that bushmeat hunting alongside destruction of the forests is a major threat to this unique environment.

Trade in bushmeat decimating Tanzanian forests

Africa urged to come together to protect migratory birds

Africa urged to come together to protect migratory birds

Posted Mon, 14 Feb 2011 14:20:00 GMT by David Hewitt

The migratory map of Africa is tipped to change significantly over the next few decades as birds react to the effects of climate change. The Finnish ornithologist Johannes Leche is widely credited with undertaking the first proper study of the migratory patterns of birds, with his pioneering work in the mid-18th century based largely upon the technique of ringing individual animals.

Africa urged to come together to protect migratory birds

Cracking the Naturalist's Code: The Fight for the Great Bear

Cracking the Naturalist's Code: The Fight for the Great Bear

Posted Sat, 12 Feb 2011 17:16:00 GMT by Eric M. Keen

From a shack in the fjords of British Columbia, one young naturalist is waging war against a consortium of the world's largest oil companies. His arsenal: gum boots, binoculars, and data - lots of it. What would compel him to such extremes? Two reasons: Whales and oil. I'll explain...

Cracking the Naturalist's Code: The Fight for the Great Bear

2011: The Year of the Turtle, for conservationists at least

2011: The Year of the Turtle, for conservationists at least

Posted Thu, 10 Feb 2011 14:33:09 GMT by David Hewitt

Conservationists around the world have pledged to make 2001 the Year of the Turtle and bring some of the world's oldest species back from the brink of extinction. While for the Chinese 2011 is the Year of the Rabbit, for an international group of conservationists it is the Year of the Turtle. For, after some 220 million years of being on the planet, around half of all species are now under threat from a range of man-made problems

2011: The Year of the Turtle, for conservationists at least

Asian tiger numbers could triple

Asian tiger numbers could triple

Posted Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:07:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Concerted efforts to develop joined up tiger reserves could triple tiger numbers in Asia. In November 2010, the heads of government of the 13 tiger range countries signed the St Petersburg declaration promising to double the world's population of wild tigers by 2020. An international team of scientists led by Dr Eric Dinerstein of chief scientist at WWF in the United States set out to discover whether this was even possible.

Asian tiger numbers could triple

New reserves proposed to protect sub-Antarctic marine life

New reserves proposed to protect sub-Antarctic marine life

Posted Mon, 31 Jan 2011 09:51:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

The New Zealand Government has just unveiled plans to create three massive new marine reserves surrounding the sub-Antarctic Islands. Antarctic islands are protected in the future. Because of the remoteness of these islands and that they are not widely fished at this time, they require unique approaches.

New reserves proposed to protect sub-Antarctic marine life

Concern for shark populations in conservation report

Concern for shark populations in conservation report

Posted Fri, 28 Jan 2011 10:46:01 GMT by John Dean

A new report has expressed concern about the future of the world's shark populations despite a decade of conservation work. The 20 countries account for more than 640,000 tonnes annually, nearly 80 per cent of total shark catch reported globally. The top ten are named in the report as Indonesia, India, Spain, Taiwan, Argentina, Mexico, Pakistan, United States, Japan, and Malaysia.

Concern for shark populations in conservation report

Fish decline linked to weather cycle in Atlantic

Fish decline linked to weather cycle in Atlantic

Posted Wed, 26 Jan 2011 10:07:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

New research suggests that a cyclical weather pattern in the Atlantic Ocean is responsible for the recent reported decline in striped bass populations. The striped bass was once one of the success stories of conservation. Previously overfished, then serious catch limits were put in place and the population of striped bass was able to recover: fishermen where then once again able to fish for these large, trophy fish along the East Coast of America.

Fish decline linked to weather cycle in Atlantic

Britain's great bustards population set to take off thanks to EU funding boost

Britain's great bustards population set to take off thanks to EU funding boost

Posted Thu, 20 Jan 2011 12:33:01 GMT by David Hewitt

Once extinct in the UK, the great bustard looks on the verge of a remarkable comeback, thanks to a new injection of funding from the European Union. It was way back in 1832 that the great bustard finally went the way of the dodo and disappeared from the British Isles. Over-zealous gamekeepers and hunters, combined with a loss of habitat also led to the disappearance of the world's biggest flying bird from several other European countries.

Britain's great bustards population set to take off thanks to EU funding boost

Sharks dying for soup - stop shark finning

Sharks dying for soup - stop shark finning

Posted Wed, 19 Jan 2011 14:55:00 GMT by Louise Murray

An average of five humans have been killed by sharks each year since 2000, yet every year we kill up to 75 million sharks for their fins, used in Chinese shark's fin soup, and as bycatch in our fisheries. Shark finning has expanded globally due to rising demand by affluent Chinese for the high status shark fin soup. Retailing at about US$ 430/kg in Hong Kong the trade is a lucrative one for fishermen. Finning is inhumane and cruel in the extreme.

Sharks dying for soup - stop shark finning

Whaling fleet prevented from refueling as the fight for whales heats up

Whaling fleet prevented from refueling as the fight for whales heats up

Posted Tue, 18 Jan 2011 09:35:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

Anti-whaling activists are continuing to make life difficult for the whalers in the Southern Ocean and they may now return to Japan empty handed. The Sea Shepherd group has managed to intercept the ship that is supplying the Japanese vessels hunting for whales in the South Ocean. The conservation group is planning to prevent the Japanese whaling supply ship, the Sun Laurel, from delivering fuel and other supplies to both the whalers and their factory ship.

Whaling fleet prevented from refueling as the fight for whales heats up

Environmentalists believe sanctuary failing to protect polar bears

Environmentalists believe sanctuary failing to protect polar bears

Posted Mon, 17 Jan 2011 10:22:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

A conservation group is planning to sue the US government for what they believe is a failure to care for a critical polar bear sanctuary in Alaska. The Centre for Biological Diversity believes that the US Interior Department has allowed harmful oil and gas developments to go ahead and as a result has significantly damaged polar bears habitat in Alaska.

Environmentalists believe sanctuary failing to protect polar bears

Saving the Jaguar

Saving the Jaguar

Posted Wed, 12 Jan 2011 11:00:00 GMT by John Dean

A campaign has been launched to save the jaguar in Northern Mexico and parts of south-western United States where its numbers are endangered. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will develop a plan to preserve habitats, starting with research into numbers and distribution of the animals, about which very little is known. A Jaguar Recovery Team has been assembled

Saving the Jaguar

US Carvers Creek State wildlife park continues to expand

US Carvers Creek State wildlife park continues to expand

Posted Wed, 12 Jan 2011 10:30:02 GMT by John Dean

A collaboration between conservationists and the Military has led to the expansion of an American park being managed for tourism and wildlife. International conservation organisation The Nature Conservancy has recently transferred almost 3,000 acres of land in Harnett and Cumberland counties to help Carvers Creek State Park continue to grow. That takes to 4,181 acres the amount of land protected by the organisation in the two counties.

US Carvers Creek State wildlife park continues to expand

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New monkeys, same old monkeying-around with forests.

Posted Thu, 05 Mar 2015 10:31:01 GMT by JW Dowey

Where have all the forests gone?

Posted Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:09:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Pangolin conservation corrupted/immense losses explained.

Posted Tue, 24 Feb 2015 09:35:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Spider monkey Valentine that you can help.

Posted Thu, 12 Feb 2015 14:16:41 GMT by Paul Robinson

Baby elephants go on holiday to China!

Posted Mon, 09 Feb 2015 16:39:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Poaching tigers, and all the rest!

Posted Fri, 06 Feb 2015 15:20:35 GMT by JW Dowey

New Andean frog species survives, for now.

Posted Tue, 03 Feb 2015 10:02:45 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Losing our ocean life?

Posted Sun, 01 Feb 2015 17:37:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Hatching Giants on Galapagos!

Posted Tue, 27 Jan 2015 17:45:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Wolfing it in Oregon

Posted Thu, 08 Jan 2015 11:41:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Serengeti World Heritage Site under threat from new highway

Posted Thu, 17 Feb 2011 13:05:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

Time for fishing bans to protect threatened tuna stocks says report

Posted Tue, 16 Aug 2011 16:37:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Hand over forests for better management

Posted Tue, 12 Jul 2011 15:44:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Is the sixth mass extinction of life on earth already happening?

Posted Fri, 04 Mar 2011 11:20:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Bird kill during wind farm construction

Posted Fri, 13 Apr 2012 19:29:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Mapping mangroves aids conservation of valuable habitats

Posted Thu, 28 Jul 2011 12:21:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Delight at mountain gorilla twin surprise

Posted Fri, 03 Jun 2011 13:14:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

The resilience of Hawaiian reefs suggests a real opportunity for conservation

Posted Wed, 05 Oct 2011 12:36:00 GMT by Dave Collier

Bald eagle population increasing in Florida

Posted Thu, 05 Jul 2012 12:45:55 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Kids' books 'use paper that destroys rainforests'

Posted Thu, 25 Nov 2010 15:22:05 GMT by Steve Humphreys