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Conservation News

Native plants pushed out by introduced species as cities grow

Native plants pushed out by introduced species as cities grow

Posted Fri, 18 Mar 2011 18:19:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Urbanisation is a human phenomenom but plants too are affected by the growth of cities and a new study finds flora is becoming less diverse. While the number of species in the city has remained constant at around 700, the team found many changes in the make up of the city's flora. Many non-native plants have been introduced and flourished in the city in the past 70 years, while native plants have been declining at a rate of 2.4 species-a-year.

Native plants pushed out by introduced species as cities grow

Global conservation issues for 2011

Global conservation issues for 2011

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 20:12:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

15 environmental issues with far-reaching implications for the Earth's biodiversity. In researching this report, the authors aimed to ''identify emerging issues that could have substantial impacts on the conservation of biological diversity and... to encourage policy-relevant, practical research on those issues''.

Global conservation issues for 2011

New measures to tackle the deaths of birds of prey in Scotland

New measures to tackle the deaths of birds of prey in Scotland

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 17:15:00 GMT by Laura Brown

An increase in the numbers of birds of prey killed in Scotland leads to the government to take action. Figures releases showing hotspots of the birds killed by poisonous chemicals reveal last year seven red kites and four golden eagles were killed. A sea eagle, brought to Scotland as part of a reintroduction programme was killed in the last twelve months.

New measures to tackle the deaths of birds of prey in Scotland

Tackling the toll of bycatch marine creatures

Tackling the toll of bycatch marine creatures

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 16:24:00 GMT by John Dean

An international animal welfare organisation has launched a competition to reduce the amount of sea creatures accidentally caught in fishermen's nets, known as by bycatch. The competition is offering a first prize of $30,000 and two $10,000 runner-up prizes. Additionally, working with the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF), the competition offers a $7,500 prize for the idea that will reduce the amount of bycatch found in tuna fisheries.

Tackling the toll of bycatch marine creatures

Unique tropical frog gives insight into amphibian genetics

Unique tropical frog gives insight into amphibian genetics

Posted Wed, 16 Mar 2011 19:17:01 GMT by Helen Roddis

Unusual hybrid frog reveals importance of considering genetics in amphibian conservation. The hybrid frog is providing scientists with exclusive insights into the genetic make-up of different amphibian populations - with important bearing on future conservation measures. The unique hybrid was produced by scientists at the University of Manchester, who allowed two entirely different, critically endangered species of Central American leaf frogs to interbreed

Unique tropical frog gives insight into amphibian genetics

WWF - 50 Years of Conservation

WWF - 50 Years of Conservation

Posted Mon, 14 Mar 2011 23:07:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Happy Birthday WWF! This year marks a momentous anniversary for WWF - 50 years of environmental conservation. Over the past 50 years, WWF has had many notable achievements. In the 1970s, Operation Tiger was launched - the first ever global campaign to save a species across its range. In the 1980s WWF, in conjunction with Save the Whales, successfully campaigned for a moratorium on commercial whaling. Filed in environmental issues: WWF/conservation.

WWF - 50 Years of Conservation

The school children that saved a rainforest

The school children that saved a rainforest

Posted Mon, 14 Mar 2011 09:31:02 GMT by Nick St Clair

The story of how a small group of Swedish school children started a movement that saved a rain forest in Costa Rica. It was just over a year ago the Copenhagen climate talks opened to fervent hopes that the world would finally come together and address the planet's most pressing environmental problems. After a great deal of posturing and rhetoric, it sadly failed to deliver even a fraction of its promises. Filed in environmental issues: rainforests/conservation.

The school children that saved a rainforest

Keep off the seagrass! Why these vital grasses are vanishing

Keep off the seagrass! Why these vital grasses are vanishing

Posted Sun, 13 Mar 2011 16:10:00 GMT by Hunter R. Wert

Seagrass beds play an undoubtedly vital role within their ecosystem. Whether it's regulating the food chain, protecting the shoreline, attracting migratory sea life or providing shelter and an overall habitat to countless creatures seagrass is always being productive and giving back to the environment. Find out about the dangers these amazing organisms face, how it affects the environment and what you can do to help prevent these vital grasses from disappearing forever! Filed in environmental issues: seagrass/conservation.

Keep off the seagrass! Why these vital grasses are vanishing

Pollution driving sea stars to evolve apart

Pollution driving sea stars to evolve apart

Posted Sun, 13 Mar 2011 11:07:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Description: Sea stars are among marine animals being fenced off genetically by plumes of pollution flowing into the sea. That's the conclusion of a genetic study on Californian sea stars by a pair of scientists at the University of Hawaii. Filed in enviromental issues: pollution/conservation.

Pollution driving sea stars to evolve apart

Mel Gibson battles to save the rainforest

Mel Gibson battles to save the rainforest

Posted Fri, 11 Mar 2011 11:55:00 GMT by Louise Saunders

Mel Gibson has travelled to Guatemala in a bid to help protect a tropical rainforest. The 55-year-old actor - who is well-known for his environmental advocacy - joined forces with Prince Albert of Monaco to take part in a private fund-raising trip to the Central American nation in the hope of guaranteeing the future sustainability of the remote rainforest of the El Mirador Basin. Filed in environmental issues: celebrity/rainforests/conservation.

Mel Gibson battles to save the rainforest

A Sad Shark's Tale: The Great White

A Sad Shark's Tale: The Great White

Posted Wed, 09 Mar 2011 16:09:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Great white shark population is worryingly low, say scientists. Great white sharks have an unwarranted reputation. In the media, sharks are cast as villains - man-eaters and killing machines. This couldn't be further from the truth. Great white sharks rarely attack humans and they play a vital role in the marine ecosystem. As top predators, sharks help to control many fish and marine mammal populations

A Sad Shark's Tale: The Great White

Give Women in Forest Communities a Voice

Give Women in Forest Communities a Voice

Posted Tue, 08 Mar 2011 16:48:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

What's special about today? Within developing countries, women are the main users of forests. These forests provide women with a vital source of food, fuel and shelter. As women have a greater dependence on forests than men, they have more to lose when forests are cut down or access denied. Despite this, the role that women could and should play in forest management continues to be ignored.

Give Women in Forest Communities a Voice

Rare Kazakhstan imperial eagles benefit from genetic counting

Rare Kazakhstan imperial eagles benefit from genetic counting

Posted Tue, 08 Mar 2011 13:04:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Conservationists may be better placed to aid eastern imperial eagles, thanks to new genetic sampling work described in a paper in Animal Conservation. By genetic profiling of feathers found in a Kazakh nature reserve, they have doubled the known number of imperial eagles at the site - and marked it as an additional focus for those seeking to safeguard these majestic birds.

Rare Kazakhstan imperial eagles benefit from genetic counting

Mass extinction is here and we don't want to keep it waiting

Mass extinction is here and we don't want to keep it waiting

Posted Mon, 07 Mar 2011 17:28:01 GMT by Nicolette Smith

Historical incidences of mass extinction and the likelihood of another such event given the declining populations of certain animal species. In 540 million years, the Earth has undergone only five mass extinctions that we know of, during which over 75% of the animal population expired.  Without jumping to sensationalist conclusions, it is safe to say that another, similar, event is unlikely, however a recent study published in Nature Magazine has investigated the likelihood of such an event occurring.

Mass extinction is here and we don't want to keep it waiting

Seeds of hope for the world's rainforests

Seeds of hope for the world's rainforests

Posted Sun, 06 Mar 2011 11:08:00 GMT by Nick St Clair

A small glimmer of hope for the future of the world's rain forests comes in the form of a 'miraculous' reforestation programme in Borneo. Horror stories about the deforestation that is destroying the world's rainforests on a massive scale are sadly old news. Every year enormous tracts of land the size of Cubaare lost, and at the current rate it is estimated that the world's rainforests will have completely disappeared by the end of this century.

Seeds of hope for the world's rainforests

Is the sixth mass extinction of life on earth already happening?

Is the sixth mass extinction of life on earth already happening?

Posted Fri, 04 Mar 2011 11:20:00 GMT by Louise Murray

The next mass extinction? Are humans the cause of the planet's sixth mass loss of species on a scale of the events that wiped out the dinosaurs? Scientists believe that we certainly will be if all creatures classified now as critically endangered are lost, but there is still time to avert the crisis.

Is the sixth mass extinction of life on earth already happening?

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Sharks and rays suffer (extinction) in the Mediterranean

Posted Tue, 06 Dec 2016 10:40:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

The endangered Tapaculo adapts to fragmentation of its forest.

Posted Mon, 28 Nov 2016 15:45:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bottom trawling for orange roughies to get green light?

Posted Tue, 25 Oct 2016 08:25:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Pacific bluefin tuna nears a critical state.

Posted Sun, 09 Oct 2016 17:25:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Extinction danger for great apes, Hawaiian plants and many more!

Posted Mon, 05 Sep 2016 20:40:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Wood we/Wouldn't we sustain our woods-well we did, once!

Posted Sun, 04 Sep 2016 13:05:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

International Bat Weekend is Here!

Posted Thu, 25 Aug 2016 07:30:13 GMT by Paul Robinson

Lobsters lose out to global warming

Posted Mon, 01 Aug 2016 12:30:49 GMT by JW Dowey

Save Tropical Forest, NOW!

Posted Thu, 14 Jul 2016 14:30:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

The GBR in black or white: coral bleaching or coal dust?

Posted Tue, 24 May 2016 09:50:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

New measures to tackle the deaths of birds of prey in Scotland

Posted Thu, 17 Mar 2011 17:15:00 GMT by Laura Brown

World Rhino Day ~ 22nd September 2012

Posted Sat, 22 Sep 2012 00:01:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Campaign to save anti-whaling ship

Posted Wed, 20 Jul 2011 11:59:00 GMT by Laura Brown

The future of Australia's conservation efforts?

Posted Thu, 09 Apr 2015 09:36:17 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Rare holiday treat as elusive cheetah makes an appearance

Posted Tue, 28 Dec 2010 10:57:00 GMT by Paromita Pain

Farmland birds bear brunt of CAP says UK charity

Posted Wed, 24 Aug 2011 14:13:40 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Rare Rainforest Trees assume Great Importance

Posted Wed, 29 Apr 2015 08:39:05 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Zoos being urged to breed endangered species

Posted Fri, 18 Mar 2011 23:49:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

Runoff, algae, quagga mussels; Erie and Huron suffering yet again

Posted Sat, 08 Oct 2011 21:11:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Coral expert predicts ''end in sight'' for reefs

Posted Wed, 08 Dec 2010 21:45:01 GMT by Steve Humphreys