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Is Brazil's Cerrado the ''ugly duckling'' of conservation?

Is Brazil's Cerrado the ''ugly duckling'' of conservation?

Posted Wed, 13 Apr 2011 15:09:00 GMT by Laura Brown

A renewed campaign to encourage consumers and campaigners to save the Cerrado, being destroyed twice as fast as the Amazon Rainforest. Because of a generation of destroying the land to plant crops for European consumers, and eradication of wildlife and plant life at twice the rate of that in the Amazon Rainforest, conservationists fear it could disappear within two decades.

Is Brazil's Cerrado the ''ugly duckling'' of conservation?

£100 million investment for UK river wildlife

£100 million investment for UK river wildlife

Posted Wed, 13 Apr 2011 13:14:00 GMT by Laura Brown

New funding to clean rivers and waterways to boost wildlife. The funding represents the start of a four year programme to tackle pollution, invasive weeds and removing redundant man-made structures like dams and weirs that inhibit the growth and development of natural wildlife.

£100 million investment for UK river wildlife

Antarctic penguins in trouble due to climate change

Antarctic penguins in trouble due to climate change

Posted Mon, 11 Apr 2011 19:00:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Antarctic penguin numbers have more than halved since the 1980's, in tandem with their favourite food. Krill densities are down almost 80%, largely due to climate change reducing winter ice cover in this fast-warming region.

Antarctic penguins in trouble due to climate change

Climate change 'poses threat to caribou'

Climate change 'poses threat to caribou'

Posted Mon, 11 Apr 2011 11:35:01 GMT by John Dean

Melting sea ice, brought about by climate change, could be forcing two species of caribou nearer to extinction, according to wildlife campaigners. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has responded to the claims about the Peary caribou and the Barren-ground Caribou by launching a review of their status.

Climate change 'poses threat to caribou'

Naked chicks are a puzzle for penguin scientists

Naked chicks are a puzzle for penguin scientists

Posted Mon, 11 Apr 2011 08:07:00 GMT by Laura Goodall

'Naked' chicks are suddenly appearing in penguin colonies in South Africa and Argentina, leaving scientists perplexed. The bald penguin chicks have a condition called feather-loss disorder. Although all penguins are born with downy feathers, some chicks inexplicably 'moult' their down before their adult feathers arrive, leaving them temporarily bald.

Naked chicks are a puzzle for penguin scientists

Chilean efforts to ban 'shark finning' praised by Pew

Chilean efforts to ban 'shark finning' praised by Pew

Posted Fri, 08 Apr 2011 10:08:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Shark finning, the horrific practice of cutting off the fins of sharks, and then dumping them still alive into the sea to die, is being pushed back by a new bill going through the Chilean Senate. The measure, which would help stop the wasteful slaughter of increasingly endangered sharks, is being supported by a visiting Pew Environment Group team.

Chilean efforts to ban 'shark finning' praised by Pew

North America's Smallest Seahorse Endangered by Gulf oil Spill

North America's Smallest Seahorse Endangered by Gulf oil Spill

Posted Fri, 08 Apr 2011 07:01:00 GMT by Kirsten E. Silven

The dwarf seahorse, which resides in seagrass located throughout the Gulf of Mexico, Florida and the Caribbean, is threatened with extinction from pollution caused by the Gulf oil spill disaster.

North America's Smallest Seahorse Endangered by Gulf oil Spill

New 'distance to extinction' index could sharpen conservation focus

New 'distance to extinction' index could sharpen conservation focus

Posted Thu, 07 Apr 2011 18:41:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

A new way to decide how close a species is to extinction has been proposed in a new paper in Frontiers in Ecology and Environment. The measure, known as the SAFE index, looks at the population today, in comparison to the smallest population that is viable, for a species. This 'distance to extinction' should complement existing measures to help conservationists prioritize resources.

New 'distance to extinction' index could sharpen conservation focus

Why did the dragonfly cross the road?

Why did the dragonfly cross the road?

Posted Thu, 07 Apr 2011 11:33:00 GMT by Mario Balzan

Conservation; Article currently in Biological Conservation on the impact of roads on dragonfly behaviour and mortality. Dragonflies are one of the most ancient and beautiful orders of insects. They are frequently top predators in wetlands, especially when fish are not present, and the predaceous younger larval stages are entirely confined to water habitats

Why did the dragonfly cross the road?

Londoners urged to take action to arrest the decline of the 'Cockney sparrow'

Londoners urged to take action to arrest the decline of the 'Cockney sparrow'

Posted Wed, 06 Apr 2011 05:33:00 GMT by David Hewitt

Though sparrows and starlings are still the most-commonly-seen birds in London, shortages of suitable food and habitat are driving their numbers down, the Earth Times has learned. Alarmingly, in fact, the figures point to a drop of around 50 per cent over the past 15-to-20 years in both sparrow and starling populations in the capital.

Londoners urged to take action to arrest the decline of the 'Cockney sparrow'

Elephant Killing Causes Internet Controversy

Elephant Killing Causes Internet Controversy

Posted Tue, 05 Apr 2011 18:07:00 GMT by Julian Jackson

Bob Parsons of GoDaddy accused of inhumane action on video. CEO Bob Parsons, of internet service provider GoDaddy is a master of controversy, often flaunting GoDaddy Girls to advertise his site, and promoting his services by what he would probably see as ''Pushing the Envelope''. However he has perhaps gone too far by shooting an elephant and posting it on video.

Elephant Killing Causes Internet Controversy

New research could save seabirds from fishing longlines

New research could save seabirds from fishing longlines

Posted Tue, 05 Apr 2011 08:33:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

Hundreds of thousands of seabirds are dying as a result of being caught in commercial fishing longlines and now a research team may just have the answer to reducing the seabird bycatch. Traditional fisheries bycatch models are based almost entirely upon fixed maps of historic bird migration data and past fishery information and there is no consideration of more dynamic factors.

New research could save seabirds from fishing longlines

Carbon grasped by Mangrove roots vastly underestimated

Carbon grasped by Mangrove roots vastly underestimated

Posted Tue, 05 Apr 2011 08:10:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Muddy mangrove swamps hold onto as much 25% of the carbon stored in similarly threatened tropical peat lands - despite covering a much smaller area. So says a paper in Nature Geoscience, which attempts to put a number to stored mangrove carbon for the first time. It reinforces their claim to conservation resources, for those trying to stymie tropical forest losses, and reduce climate-change causing emissions.

Carbon grasped by Mangrove roots vastly underestimated

Oil and gas platform threatens Critically Endangered whale

Oil and gas platform threatens Critically Endangered whale

Posted Sat, 02 Apr 2011 15:27:00 GMT by Helen Roddis

The Critically Endangered Western gray whale is under threat from the development of a new oil and gas platform off Russia's Sakhalin Island. The biggest concern is the proximity of the proposed platform to the feeding grounds of the Critically Endangered Western gray whale. The area earmarked for the project is near Piltun Bay, the primary feeding area for Western gray whale mothers and calves.

Oil and gas platform threatens Critically Endangered whale

Human activity threatening unique Antarctic marine ecosystem

Human activity threatening unique Antarctic marine ecosystem

Posted Sat, 02 Apr 2011 15:09:00 GMT by Helen Roddis

Antarctica's unique marine ecosystem is being increasingly threatened by human activity, according to a new report published this week. According to a new study by a team of scientists in the UK and the U.S., human activity is degrading Antarctica's marine ecosystems, placing native species under increasing pressure and upsetting the delicate balance of this exceptional region.

Human activity threatening unique Antarctic marine ecosystem

RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch shows a good year for little birds

RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch shows a good year for little birds

Posted Fri, 01 Apr 2011 10:39:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

Small birds come up tops in this year's Big Garden Birdwatch. The latest Big Garden Birdwatch has yet again delivered excellent results about the U.K's garden birds. Over 600,000 people in Britain joined in, noting down information about the birds they had seen in their back gardens; which is a record-breaking number of respondents and makes this the world's biggest bird survey.

RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch shows a good year for little birds

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Extinction or habitat management - the stark choice.

Posted Tue, 04 Jul 2017 09:35:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Dingo rules - both kangaroos and nutrient supplies.

Posted Wed, 10 May 2017 09:39:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Thai tigers survive and breed in the wild.

Posted Wed, 29 Mar 2017 09:45:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Hedgehogs mirror wildlife problems around the world.

Posted Mon, 06 Feb 2017 10:25:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Primates matter, and this is why!

Posted Mon, 23 Jan 2017 10:15:00 GMT by JW. Dowey

The Casper octopus thrives in the deep sea, but exploiters are threatening

Posted Tue, 20 Dec 2016 10:05:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Sharks and rays suffer (extinction) in the Mediterranean

Posted Tue, 06 Dec 2016 10:40:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

The endangered Tapaculo adapts to fragmentation of its forest.

Posted Mon, 28 Nov 2016 15:45:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bottom trawling for orange roughies to get green light?

Posted Tue, 25 Oct 2016 08:25:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Pacific bluefin tuna nears a critical state.

Posted Sun, 09 Oct 2016 17:25:00 GMT by JW Dowey

How wolves could save threatened lynx species

Posted Wed, 31 Aug 2011 14:43:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Speciation taking place in Gall wasps

Posted Wed, 15 Feb 2012 00:03:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Bluefin Tuna dispersal tracked for the first time

Posted Thu, 24 May 2012 18:24:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

WWF - 50 Years of Conservation

Posted Mon, 14 Mar 2011 23:07:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

From rabbiting to killer shrimps: IAS (Part II) in detail

Posted Tue, 26 Feb 2013 12:13:48 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Climate change 'poses threat to caribou'

Posted Mon, 11 Apr 2011 11:35:01 GMT by John Dean

Mass extinction is here and we don't want to keep it waiting

Posted Mon, 07 Mar 2011 17:28:01 GMT by Nicolette Smith

Spineless Stories of Mass Extinction

Posted Sat, 01 Sep 2012 19:20:33 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A small pocket of conservation in Iran

Posted Thu, 10 Oct 2013 04:09:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Records of recent conservation in America

Posted Mon, 09 Dec 2013 13:49:00 GMT by Paul Robinson