Earth Times Logo
RSS Feed Google+ Facebook Twitter Linked In Pinterest


Conservation News

Population boost for rare greater bamboo lemurs

Population boost for rare greater bamboo lemurs

Posted Tue, 01 Mar 2011 23:35:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Conservationists have found populations of the greater bamboo lemur in new areas of Madagascar. Now, the future for these critically endangered species is a little bit brighter. Like many of Madagascar's unique species, the greater bamboo lemur is under increasing pressure. Rainforests in Madagascar are being cleared by indiscriminate slash-and-burn techniques to make way for farmland.

Population boost for rare greater bamboo lemurs

Five Lost Frogs Rediscovered

Five Lost Frogs Rediscovered

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 21:55:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Five species of frog, some unseen for 136 years, have been rediscovered in India. Amphibians of India aims to rediscover 50 species of Indian amphibians that are considered to be actually, or potentially, extinct in the wild. These are the so-called 'lost' species. Launched in December 2010, it is an ambitious campaign led by the University of Delhi in conjunction with the IUCN and Conservation International.

Five Lost Frogs Rediscovered

Worrying news for critically endangered Siberian tigers

Worrying news for critically endangered Siberian tigers

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 16:27:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

The critically endangered Siberian tiger has an effective population of just 14 animals - that's the worrying conclusion of a recent study into these stunning cats. The Siberian tiger, also known as the Amur tiger, is the world's largest cat. Previously it ranged far across northern China, Korea and south eastern Russia. In the early 20th Century the Siberian tiger was driven close to extinction through poaching and habitat loss and was wiped out from 90% of its once large range.

Worrying news for critically endangered Siberian tigers

Third birthday for Arctic stronghold of biodiversity celebrated with very cautious optimism

Third birthday for Arctic stronghold of biodiversity celebrated with very cautious optimism

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 08:02:02 GMT by Colin Ricketts

With more than 600,000 seeds in cold storage the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, which is three years old, is a vital store of genetic diversity. The third anniversary of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault (SGSV) saw yet more seeds arriving at the Arctic stronghold of biodiversity while an important Egyptian collection was looted during the recent revolution and farmers in Australia report almost impossible conditions for agriculture.

Third birthday for Arctic stronghold of biodiversity celebrated with very cautious optimism

Danger signals for the future of turtles

Danger signals for the future of turtles

Posted Tue, 22 Feb 2011 13:36:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Human intervention is causing a serious decline in the world turtle population. 2011 has been designated 'The Year of the Turtle' by Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (PARC). Turtles are currently disappearing from the planet faster than any other kind of animal and although they have been around for about 220 million years.

Danger signals for the future of turtles

Struggle to halt possible bat extinction

Struggle to halt possible bat extinction

Posted Tue, 22 Feb 2011 12:55:05 GMT by Michael Evans

A deadly fungus known as White Nose Syndrome is threatening to wipe out North America's hibernating bat population. Conservationists across North America are racing to discover a solution to a deadly fungus that is threatening to wipe out the hibernating bat population. White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) is a fatal disease that targets hibernating bats and the cause is believed to be a newly discovered cold-adapted fungus, Geomyces destructans that invades the living skin of hibernating bats.

Struggle to halt possible bat extinction

Multi-million dollar fund announced for US wildlife projects

Multi-million dollar fund announced for US wildlife projects

Posted Mon, 21 Feb 2011 15:08:00 GMT by John Dean

The longstanding connection between nature conservation and hunting and fishing in the US has been confirmed with the announcement of a $749 million fund for wildlife projects. US Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said that the money was coming from excise tax revenues generated by sportsmen and women and would go to state and territorial fish and wildlife agencies.

Multi-million dollar fund announced for US wildlife projects

Less big fish means more little fish

Less big fish means more little fish

Posted Sun, 20 Feb 2011 13:09:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

People are eating the oceans dry of the big predatory fish leaving the smaller fish to claim the waters. Scientists have confirmed that with humans overfishing the big predatory fish at the top of the food chain the smaller fish are thriving in their new niche. People's desire to eat the big fish species, such bluefin tuna, cod and grouper, has meant their numbers have reduced worldwide by a massive 60 percent.

Less big fish means more little fish

Sea Shepherd success as Japan ends whaling season early

Sea Shepherd success as Japan ends whaling season early

Posted Fri, 18 Feb 2011 14:19:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

The Japanese government has announced that they have decided to bring this year's Antarctic Ocean whaling season to an early end. A statement by the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries they said their whaling fleet will be returning home shortly as a result of the ongoing harassment that they have been receiving from the anti-whaling activists in the Antarctic Ocean, naming the vessels run by the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society.

Sea Shepherd success as Japan ends whaling season early

Serengeti World Heritage Site under threat from new highway

Serengeti World Heritage Site under threat from new highway

Posted Thu, 17 Feb 2011 13:05:01 GMT by Lucy Brake

The Serengeti World Heritage Site in Tanzania is in serious danger as the government pushes on with plans for a major new roading link. At a meeting with the World Bank, Tanzania's President, Jakaya Kilwete, gave his support and approval for the major highway project. President Kilwete said that the highway planned through the Serengeti National Park is not a major disaster for the environment.

Serengeti World Heritage Site under threat from new highway

Cocaine production spells doom for Colombia's rainforests

Cocaine production spells doom for Colombia's rainforests

Posted Wed, 16 Feb 2011 11:00:01 GMT by Michael Evans

Colombian rainforests under threat due to an increase in production of coca to meet world demand for cocaine. More than 1,821 species of birds, 623 species of amphibians, 467 species of mammals, 518 species of reptiles and 3,200 species of fish are found, mainly in the country's vast tracts of tropical forest.

Cocaine production spells doom for Colombia's rainforests

Elephant numbers on the increase in Kenya

Elephant numbers on the increase in Kenya

Posted Tue, 15 Feb 2011 17:18:00 GMT by Louise Murray

A real conservation success story, a new elephant census in Kenya's Tsavo ecosystem shows numbers increasing despite ivory poaching and a prolonged drought in the area. The Earth Times spoke to Patrick Omondi, senior assistant director of Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), who co-ordinated the elephant census, which is held every three years.

Elephant numbers on the increase in Kenya

Trade in bushmeat decimating Tanzanian forests

Trade in bushmeat decimating Tanzanian forests

Posted Tue, 15 Feb 2011 13:27:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

Bushmeat taken from one of the most threatened forests in the world is placing significant pressure on the Udzungwa forest species and ecosystems. In Tanzania, international and local environmentalists have just released a new report which confirms that bushmeat hunting alongside destruction of the forests is a major threat to this unique environment.

Trade in bushmeat decimating Tanzanian forests

Africa urged to come together to protect migratory birds

Africa urged to come together to protect migratory birds

Posted Mon, 14 Feb 2011 14:20:00 GMT by David Hewitt

The migratory map of Africa is tipped to change significantly over the next few decades as birds react to the effects of climate change. The Finnish ornithologist Johannes Leche is widely credited with undertaking the first proper study of the migratory patterns of birds, with his pioneering work in the mid-18th century based largely upon the technique of ringing individual animals.

Africa urged to come together to protect migratory birds

Cracking the Naturalist's Code: The Fight for the Great Bear

Cracking the Naturalist's Code: The Fight for the Great Bear

Posted Sat, 12 Feb 2011 17:16:00 GMT by Eric M. Keen

From a shack in the fjords of British Columbia, one young naturalist is waging war against a consortium of the world's largest oil companies. His arsenal: gum boots, binoculars, and data - lots of it. What would compel him to such extremes? Two reasons: Whales and oil. I'll explain...

Cracking the Naturalist's Code: The Fight for the Great Bear

2011: The Year of the Turtle, for conservationists at least

2011: The Year of the Turtle, for conservationists at least

Posted Thu, 10 Feb 2011 14:33:09 GMT by David Hewitt

Conservationists around the world have pledged to make 2001 the Year of the Turtle and bring some of the world's oldest species back from the brink of extinction. While for the Chinese 2011 is the Year of the Rabbit, for an international group of conservationists it is the Year of the Turtle. For, after some 220 million years of being on the planet, around half of all species are now under threat from a range of man-made problems

2011: The Year of the Turtle, for conservationists at least

Conservation News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

Whales are wailing (in Faroes and Puget Sound)

Posted Sun, 31 Aug 2014 16:58:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Conservation is too conservative in the UK

Posted Wed, 27 Aug 2014 06:08:13 GMT by Paul Robinson

Watch the whale population in Norway!

Posted Tue, 26 Aug 2014 08:32:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Blue Shark life and death in the Azores

Posted Thu, 14 Aug 2014 12:19:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Carbon credits, afforestation and wildlife diversity, at last

Posted Mon, 11 Aug 2014 06:30:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Another extinct cetacean?

Posted Thu, 07 Aug 2014 07:44:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Ant eater lovers wanted

Posted Sun, 27 Jul 2014 10:29:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Diverse worlds of animals and plants disappearing

Posted Fri, 18 Jul 2014 10:45:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Gorillas see tourists by appointment

Posted Sun, 29 Jun 2014 08:39:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Sea change in Europe is slow

Posted Mon, 23 Jun 2014 06:50:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Unbearable life of the Dancing Bears

Posted Tue, 06 Mar 2012 07:29:23 GMT by Atula Gupta

Para La Tierra fights back

Posted Thu, 20 Jun 2013 11:46:07 GMT by Joseph Sarvary

Rate of deforestation increases in the Amazon and elsewhere

Posted Sun, 17 Nov 2013 08:00:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Does de-extinction stink?

Posted Tue, 26 Mar 2013 14:26:30 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Area of sustainably managed forest increases

Posted Fri, 10 Jun 2011 11:04:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Celebrating biodiversity today - putting conservation into politics

Posted Sun, 22 May 2011 00:00:01 GMT by Mario Balzan

Protected species found on sale in Thai markets

Posted Thu, 16 Jun 2011 13:22:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Hoolock gibbons rescued in India

Posted Wed, 30 Nov 2011 18:44:00 GMT by James Mathews

WWF demands action from leaders in Brazzaville

Posted Tue, 31 May 2011 21:14:44 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Time for fishing bans to protect threatened tuna stocks says report

Posted Tue, 16 Aug 2011 16:37:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts