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Conservation News

Keep off the seagrass! Why these vital grasses are vanishing

Keep off the seagrass! Why these vital grasses are vanishing

Posted Sun, 13 Mar 2011 16:10:00 GMT by Hunter R. Wert

Seagrass beds play an undoubtedly vital role within their ecosystem. Whether it's regulating the food chain, protecting the shoreline, attracting migratory sea life or providing shelter and an overall habitat to countless creatures seagrass is always being productive and giving back to the environment. Find out about the dangers these amazing organisms face, how it affects the environment and what you can do to help prevent these vital grasses from disappearing forever! Filed in environmental issues: seagrass/conservation.

Keep off the seagrass! Why these vital grasses are vanishing

Pollution driving sea stars to evolve apart

Pollution driving sea stars to evolve apart

Posted Sun, 13 Mar 2011 11:07:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Description: Sea stars are among marine animals being fenced off genetically by plumes of pollution flowing into the sea. That's the conclusion of a genetic study on Californian sea stars by a pair of scientists at the University of Hawaii. Filed in enviromental issues: pollution/conservation.

Pollution driving sea stars to evolve apart

Mel Gibson battles to save the rainforest

Mel Gibson battles to save the rainforest

Posted Fri, 11 Mar 2011 11:55:00 GMT by Louise Saunders

Mel Gibson has travelled to Guatemala in a bid to help protect a tropical rainforest. The 55-year-old actor - who is well-known for his environmental advocacy - joined forces with Prince Albert of Monaco to take part in a private fund-raising trip to the Central American nation in the hope of guaranteeing the future sustainability of the remote rainforest of the El Mirador Basin. Filed in environmental issues: celebrity/rainforests/conservation.

Mel Gibson battles to save the rainforest

A Sad Shark's Tale: The Great White

A Sad Shark's Tale: The Great White

Posted Wed, 09 Mar 2011 16:09:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Great white shark population is worryingly low, say scientists. Great white sharks have an unwarranted reputation. In the media, sharks are cast as villains - man-eaters and killing machines. This couldn't be further from the truth. Great white sharks rarely attack humans and they play a vital role in the marine ecosystem. As top predators, sharks help to control many fish and marine mammal populations

A Sad Shark's Tale: The Great White

Give Women in Forest Communities a Voice

Give Women in Forest Communities a Voice

Posted Tue, 08 Mar 2011 16:48:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

What's special about today? Within developing countries, women are the main users of forests. These forests provide women with a vital source of food, fuel and shelter. As women have a greater dependence on forests than men, they have more to lose when forests are cut down or access denied. Despite this, the role that women could and should play in forest management continues to be ignored.

Give Women in Forest Communities a Voice

Rare Kazakhstan imperial eagles benefit from genetic counting

Rare Kazakhstan imperial eagles benefit from genetic counting

Posted Tue, 08 Mar 2011 13:04:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Conservationists may be better placed to aid eastern imperial eagles, thanks to new genetic sampling work described in a paper in Animal Conservation. By genetic profiling of feathers found in a Kazakh nature reserve, they have doubled the known number of imperial eagles at the site - and marked it as an additional focus for those seeking to safeguard these majestic birds.

Rare Kazakhstan imperial eagles benefit from genetic counting

Mass extinction is here and we don't want to keep it waiting

Mass extinction is here and we don't want to keep it waiting

Posted Mon, 07 Mar 2011 17:28:01 GMT by Nicolette Smith

Historical incidences of mass extinction and the likelihood of another such event given the declining populations of certain animal species. In 540 million years, the Earth has undergone only five mass extinctions that we know of, during which over 75% of the animal population expired.  Without jumping to sensationalist conclusions, it is safe to say that another, similar, event is unlikely, however a recent study published in Nature Magazine has investigated the likelihood of such an event occurring.

Mass extinction is here and we don't want to keep it waiting

Seeds of hope for the world's rainforests

Seeds of hope for the world's rainforests

Posted Sun, 06 Mar 2011 11:08:00 GMT by Nick St Clair

A small glimmer of hope for the future of the world's rain forests comes in the form of a 'miraculous' reforestation programme in Borneo. Horror stories about the deforestation that is destroying the world's rainforests on a massive scale are sadly old news. Every year enormous tracts of land the size of Cubaare lost, and at the current rate it is estimated that the world's rainforests will have completely disappeared by the end of this century.

Seeds of hope for the world's rainforests

Is the sixth mass extinction of life on earth already happening?

Is the sixth mass extinction of life on earth already happening?

Posted Fri, 04 Mar 2011 11:20:00 GMT by Louise Murray

The next mass extinction? Are humans the cause of the planet's sixth mass loss of species on a scale of the events that wiped out the dinosaurs? Scientists believe that we certainly will be if all creatures classified now as critically endangered are lost, but there is still time to avert the crisis.

Is the sixth mass extinction of life on earth already happening?

Critically Endangered Javan Rhinoceros Proven to be Breeding

Critically Endangered Javan Rhinoceros Proven to be Breeding

Posted Wed, 02 Mar 2011 18:49:00 GMT by Nikki Bruce

A hidden camera holds proof that the Javan Rhinoceros is breeding in the wild. Recent footage from a hidden camera in Ujung Kulon National Park, Indonesia, has proven that the extremely rare Javan rhino is successfully breading in the wild. Much to the relief of the park rangers, footage was recorded of a mother rhino and its young calf feeding on the shrubbery in the park.

Critically Endangered Javan Rhinoceros Proven to be Breeding

Special ELF 'mini-harpoons' to halt Caribbean Lionfish invasion

Special ELF 'mini-harpoons' to halt Caribbean Lionfish invasion

Posted Wed, 02 Mar 2011 13:10:00 GMT by Tamara Croes

In the Dutch Caribbean, special Lion Fish Eliminating Devices are now being implemented in an effort to halt the alarming spread of this voracious intruder. The Lionfish is creating an ecological disaster on the Caribbean coral reefs. The devices, which are not actual harpoons, have been specially developed to enable divers to capture the highly poisonous lionfish from a safe distance.

Special ELF 'mini-harpoons' to halt Caribbean Lionfish invasion

Population boost for rare greater bamboo lemurs

Population boost for rare greater bamboo lemurs

Posted Tue, 01 Mar 2011 23:35:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Conservationists have found populations of the greater bamboo lemur in new areas of Madagascar. Now, the future for these critically endangered species is a little bit brighter. Like many of Madagascar's unique species, the greater bamboo lemur is under increasing pressure. Rainforests in Madagascar are being cleared by indiscriminate slash-and-burn techniques to make way for farmland.

Population boost for rare greater bamboo lemurs

Five Lost Frogs Rediscovered

Five Lost Frogs Rediscovered

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 21:55:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Five species of frog, some unseen for 136 years, have been rediscovered in India. Amphibians of India aims to rediscover 50 species of Indian amphibians that are considered to be actually, or potentially, extinct in the wild. These are the so-called 'lost' species. Launched in December 2010, it is an ambitious campaign led by the University of Delhi in conjunction with the IUCN and Conservation International.

Five Lost Frogs Rediscovered

Worrying news for critically endangered Siberian tigers

Worrying news for critically endangered Siberian tigers

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 16:27:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

The critically endangered Siberian tiger has an effective population of just 14 animals - that's the worrying conclusion of a recent study into these stunning cats. The Siberian tiger, also known as the Amur tiger, is the world's largest cat. Previously it ranged far across northern China, Korea and south eastern Russia. In the early 20th Century the Siberian tiger was driven close to extinction through poaching and habitat loss and was wiped out from 90% of its once large range.

Worrying news for critically endangered Siberian tigers

Third birthday for Arctic stronghold of biodiversity celebrated with very cautious optimism

Third birthday for Arctic stronghold of biodiversity celebrated with very cautious optimism

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 08:02:02 GMT by Colin Ricketts

With more than 600,000 seeds in cold storage the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, which is three years old, is a vital store of genetic diversity. The third anniversary of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault (SGSV) saw yet more seeds arriving at the Arctic stronghold of biodiversity while an important Egyptian collection was looted during the recent revolution and farmers in Australia report almost impossible conditions for agriculture.

Third birthday for Arctic stronghold of biodiversity celebrated with very cautious optimism

Danger signals for the future of turtles

Danger signals for the future of turtles

Posted Tue, 22 Feb 2011 13:36:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Human intervention is causing a serious decline in the world turtle population. 2011 has been designated 'The Year of the Turtle' by Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (PARC). Turtles are currently disappearing from the planet faster than any other kind of animal and although they have been around for about 220 million years.

Danger signals for the future of turtles

Conservation News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

Humpbacks Come Back

Posted Wed, 10 Dec 2014 11:55:54 GMT by JW Dowey

Sentinels for our distant past in Andamans?

Posted Fri, 05 Dec 2014 09:18:01 GMT by JW Dowey

Conservation and Reintroductions

Posted Tue, 18 Nov 2014 23:00:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

You shall have a (very little) fishy.

Posted Tue, 11 Nov 2014 09:40:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

International cooperation can create recovery from the Aral Sea disaster

Posted Thu, 30 Oct 2014 11:41:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Biodiversity Progress Today

Posted Mon, 06 Oct 2014 18:36:00 GMT by JW Dowey

No Bryde's for the future?

Posted Sat, 04 Oct 2014 08:18:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Cuscomys comes back from the dead

Posted Mon, 29 Sep 2014 15:16:55 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Kruger rhinos' final chance

Posted Sat, 20 Sep 2014 08:53:11 GMT by Paul Robinson

Sturgeon survives, but not for long, it seems

Posted Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:17:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Area of sustainably managed forest increases

Posted Fri, 10 Jun 2011 11:04:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

The effect of wind turbines on bats

Posted Tue, 01 Nov 2011 17:40:00 GMT by Ines Morales

Twenty years after ban ivory still being traded

Posted Thu, 06 Oct 2011 06:25:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Caribou collapse: look to oil-sands, not wolves, says new study

Posted Wed, 22 Jun 2011 14:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Plan aims to manage white nose syndrome across borders

Posted Tue, 17 May 2011 22:03:00 GMT by Melanie J. Martin

Long way to restoring Bald Eagle Population

Posted Tue, 28 Dec 2010 11:10:01 GMT by Paromita Pain

Bees Need Pods

Posted Tue, 17 May 2011 16:57:00 GMT by Julian Jackson

Indonesia to deport Ford?

Posted Thu, 12 Sep 2013 07:51:36 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Bonds for trees programme announced

Posted Sun, 18 Sep 2011 22:01:01 GMT by Dale Kiefer

Bluefin Tuna dispersal tracked for the first time

Posted Thu, 24 May 2012 18:24:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong