Earth Times Logo
RSS Feed Google+ Facebook Twitter Linked In Pinterest


Conservation News

Pacific conservation resurgence

Pacific conservation resurgence

Posted Tue, 06 May 2014 11:05:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

At last, the Pacific is being reconverted from a plastic waste dump into the original coral island ecosystem we all know it deserves to be. Wake up, the rest of Oceania, and take part in the big oceanscape they are planning in the western ocean.

Pacific conservation resurgence

Rainforest conservation success, so far

Rainforest conservation success, so far

Posted Tue, 29 Apr 2014 12:32:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

What would you do with Indonesia? All the forest is threatened and multi-nationals insist on logging on. Except for one, that is, and now will they all perform an about-turn and conserve our rainforest species, habitats and futures?

Rainforest conservation success, so far

Poaching in Kenya to end?

Poaching in Kenya to end?

Posted Mon, 28 Apr 2014 11:26:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Want to protect rhino and elephant? Put your money into drone surveillance and we'll see how many poachers we can catch in Kenya. Trouble is, the Far East may get their supplies elsewhere.

Poaching in Kenya to end?

Sustainability of land use, or lack of it

Sustainability of land use, or lack of it

Posted Fri, 25 Apr 2014 11:06:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Luc Gnacadja has presented us with a striking and memorable picture of land as we know it, have known and will know it. Agencies and government can argue, but the future is more important than they are. Heeding good advice is the key to slowing this precipitous collapse of our forest areas, soils and agriculture.

Sustainability of land use, or lack of it

Anti-poaching drones: the answer!

Anti-poaching drones: the answer!

Posted Sun, 20 Apr 2014 16:40:02 GMT by Julie Cook

How will we prevent the Chinese and other poaching gangs from continuing their greedy and bloodthirsty crimes? The use of military units has already proved useful and suitably adverse conditions for the cowardly crime. Now a semi-permanent eye in the sky will obviously enable more efficient use of rangers and prevent their deaths!

Anti-poaching drones: the answer!

Green turtles need help

Green turtles need help

Posted Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:40:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

How to provide for indigenous and other peoples with a rare animal as a food source and sustain their diet? (As well as make sure we don’t have another extinction on our hands). A scientific approach is required in the Caribbean, where little seems to be going well in some countries, while others conserve their fauna and flora to make large profits from tourism.

Green turtles need help

Stork Renaissance

Stork Renaissance

Posted Fri, 04 Apr 2014 06:35:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Stalking the fabulous stork in Britain has been a forlorn experience for a long time. Vagrants and margarine have been the only possibilities, but with a little help from their friends, 2 individuals have literally set up home on a Norfolk chimney and seem primed to produce more 2-meter wing-spanned aliens. These effects of global warming are welcome, perhaps they will recognise the current Sahara sand covering the east of England.

Stork Renaissance

Good news for newts' DNA

Good news for newts' DNA

Posted Mon, 31 Mar 2014 06:00:00 GMT by Penny Bunting

Even the tiniest larva of the threatened Triturus cristatus, (great crested newt) can be detected with eDNA techniques. With this eye-opening research, the smallest invertebrates can be quickly assessed too, giving us great insight into current situations of species.

Good news for newts' DNA

Camels lynx and eagles invade?

Camels lynx and eagles invade?

Posted Mon, 17 Mar 2014 13:55:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

When is an alien species really alien? Maybe only when it is a critical danger to another species. A new book from a popular author puts forward persuasive and alarming arguments. Camels, eagles, snakes, spiders and influenza virus, wrapped up in invasive packaging.

Camels lynx and eagles invade?

Greening our oceans?

Greening our oceans?

Posted Thu, 06 Mar 2014 12:09:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

After the World Ocean Summit, the long term future is not assured. We can hope that the more positive nations move on aggressively, to combat those people and industries who would violently continue their unthinking habits. Some fishing and eating habits became obsolete when so many species, great and small, started to disappear

Greening our oceans?

Simply red (squirrel) is better

Simply red (squirrel) is better

Posted Tue, 25 Feb 2014 07:38:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

We struggle against invasive species, but sometimes research helps to finally understand what can be done to preserve the status quo. The red squirrel is healthy in Europe and in Scotland, but where pine forests are less common and the grey’s virus can strike, none remain.

Simply red (squirrel) is better

Condors are in California, but for how long?

Condors are in California, but for how long?

Posted Fri, 21 Feb 2014 14:29:00 GMT by JW Dowey

They used to rule the roost and the skies in North America, with even bigger species of Gymnogyps flying until recently. Now the Californian condors are finding it difficult to eke an existence while they are being poisoned by lead from bullets fired by ranchers, poachers and hunters.

Condors are in California, but for how long?

Save the Congo chimpanzee!

Save the Congo chimpanzee!

Posted Tue, 11 Feb 2014 08:49:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

With discovery comes responsibility. At least we don’t face extinction yet for the chimpanzee. These last great discoveries of the “polluting era” are important in that we can still recover the situation for many species, some of them on their last legs. In the case of our closest relative, we need to motivate, to work hard and even fight to the death for the result that is imperative.

Save the Congo chimpanzee!

Chitwan shines, but the railway threatens

Chitwan shines, but the railway threatens

Posted Wed, 05 Feb 2014 07:31:00 GMT by JW Dowey

International pressure on African, South American and now Asian nations is growing so that we can retain the prime heritage of biodiverse reserves within each country. Without them, the future is bleak for both species and the industry that relies on natural resources being kept in place. It is simply foolish to destroy what you have for short-term gains. There is a future that has to be considered-something we have rarely done in the past.

Chitwan shines, but the railway threatens

Dodo relative lives, but only just!

Dodo relative lives, but only just!

Posted Sat, 25 Jan 2014 10:01:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

The little dodo is a LARGE pigeon endemic to Samoa, where its toothed beak lets it rip into the fruits of a tree in the mahogany family. It hasn’t been studied scientifically and none are in captivity, so the outlook could be even bleaker than these population estimates suggest!

Dodo relative lives, but only just!

Riverside vegetation and favoured birds

Riverside vegetation and favoured birds

Posted Tue, 14 Jan 2014 17:38:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Ways to improve our environment vary from cutting everything down to leaving corridors for animals and plants to penetrate. This study recommends really trying to encourage riverside vegetation. It achieves the complexity that we miss so often in anthropogenic landscapes.

Riverside vegetation and favoured birds

Conservation News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

Biodiversity Progress Today

Posted Mon, 06 Oct 2014 18:36:00 GMT by JW Dowey

No Bryde's for the future?

Posted Sat, 04 Oct 2014 08:18:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Cuscomys comes back from the dead

Posted Mon, 29 Sep 2014 15:16:55 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Kruger rhinos' final chance

Posted Sat, 20 Sep 2014 08:53:11 GMT by Paul Robinson

Sturgeon survives, but not for long, it seems

Posted Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:17:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

An Amazonian nightmare of deforestation

Posted Thu, 11 Sep 2014 09:33:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Whales are wailing (in Faroes and Puget Sound)

Posted Sun, 31 Aug 2014 16:58:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Conservation is too conservative in the UK

Posted Wed, 27 Aug 2014 06:08:13 GMT by Paul Robinson

Watch the whale population in Norway!

Posted Tue, 26 Aug 2014 08:32:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Blue Shark life and death in the Azores

Posted Thu, 14 Aug 2014 12:19:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Save the Congo chimpanzee!

Posted Tue, 11 Feb 2014 08:49:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Coral reefs more vulnerable than they appear

Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2011 05:50:51 GMT by Dale Kiefer

2011: The Year of the Turtle, for conservationists at least

Posted Thu, 10 Feb 2011 14:33:09 GMT by David Hewitt

Sustainability of land use, or lack of it

Posted Fri, 25 Apr 2014 11:06:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Tiger numbers on the rise in India

Posted Mon, 28 Mar 2011 21:25:01 GMT by Helen Roddis

The magnificent meanderings of Lightning McQueen

Posted Mon, 16 Apr 2012 12:05:58 GMT by Martin Leggett

How ocean acidification is affecting coral reef ecosystems

Posted Tue, 29 Nov 2011 17:33:00 GMT by James Mathews

Russians join fight for sustainable fisheries

Posted Mon, 21 Mar 2011 08:22:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

Rock climbing as a threat to cliffs' biological diversity

Posted Thu, 05 May 2011 11:16:01 GMT by Mario Balzan

Asian tiger numbers could triple

Posted Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:07:00 GMT by Louise Murray