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Conservation News

CSI Rainforest: genetic codes can catch out illegal loggers says study

CSI Rainforest: genetic codes can catch out illegal loggers says study

Posted Sun, 03 Jul 2011 16:50:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Genetic fingerprinting can help track wood and ensure that illegal loggers are brought to book say an Australian team who are working on a DNA fingerprint for all the planet's grass and tree species. DNA fingerprinting has been used in Australia since 2007 to prove that timber is legally sourced and the practice has spread to Europe and the United States of America.

CSI Rainforest: genetic codes can catch out illegal loggers says study

Letting London's parks grow wild again key to bringing back wildlife

Letting London's parks grow wild again key to bringing back wildlife

Posted Thu, 30 Jun 2011 22:27:00 GMT by David Hewitt

Central London's birding expert talks conservation, kestrels and keeping the public happy as he takes The Earth Times on a wildlife-themed tour of Regent's Park. Arguably the last place you'd think of if you were asked to name London's top havens for birds but the figures don't lie: last year alone, some 124 species of birds were spotted either just feeding or nesting in the Royal Park, among them ospreys, little owls common terns and peregrine falcons.

Letting London's parks grow wild again key to bringing back wildlife

Rainforest birds rebound in parts of Amazon laid low

Rainforest birds rebound in parts of Amazon laid low

Posted Wed, 29 Jun 2011 12:21:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

The tragic loss of biodiversity from rainforest destruction can be reversed, says a study just published on PLoS ONE, which recorded a return of tropical birds to parts of the Amazon previously felled. The fragments of Brazilian rainforest that recovered their brightly-colored birds were the larger of those left by the loggers - aided by the regrowth of secondary forest.

Rainforest birds rebound in parts of Amazon laid low

Experts argue over future of 'Happy Feet' penguin

Experts argue over future of 'Happy Feet' penguin

Posted Tue, 28 Jun 2011 09:25:00 GMT by Laura Brown

Penguin found washed up on New Zealand's coast could be released into wild or kept in captivity. The fate of a juvenile Emperor Penguin found washed up on a New Zealand beach has gripped the country and its media.

Experts argue over future of 'Happy Feet' penguin

Good news for wildlife in Afghanistan

Good news for wildlife in Afghanistan

Posted Mon, 27 Jun 2011 19:58:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Despite a decade of conflict in Afghanistan, the country's wildlife is holding on. A new survey carried out by Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) scientists has shown that large mammals are surviving in some areas of Afghanistan after ten years of conflict.

Good news for wildlife in Afghanistan

How the genes of Cedric and Spirit can help save the Tasmanian devils

How the genes of Cedric and Spirit can help save the Tasmanian devils

Posted Mon, 27 Jun 2011 19:01:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Tasmanian devils, the pug-shaped ferocious predators of the marsupial world, are under mortal threat from a face-eating cancer. But ground-breaking new genetic research, online now in the latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is helping conservationists to form a plan to protect the last of the big carnivorous marsupials.

How the genes of Cedric and Spirit can help save the Tasmanian devils

World Heritage sites in danger

World Heritage sites in danger

Posted Fri, 24 Jun 2011 20:09:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Over-exploitation of resources is damaging the world's valuable natural World Heritage Sites. IUCN have stated that mining and oil/gas exploration should not be permitted within World Heritage sites. African World Heritage sites are particularly at risk from commercial mining and oil/gas exploration, with a quarter of all sites threatened.

World Heritage sites in danger

New map tracks protected fish and wildlife

New map tracks protected fish and wildlife

Posted Fri, 24 Jun 2011 13:51:00 GMT by Laura Brown

Online resource provides mapping tool to see where protected fish and wildlife live and blossom. A new interactive map has gone live online in Washington helping to keep track of populations of fish and wildlife deemed to be at risk of changing habitat and falling numbers.

New map tracks protected fish and wildlife

Controversial hunting restrictions on New York deer

Controversial hunting restrictions on New York deer

Posted Thu, 23 Jun 2011 12:19:01 GMT by Laura Brown

Proposals to bring in restrictions on the hunting of young deer in New York State meets with stiff opposition. There are around a million white tailed deer in New York state. Managing thier numbers through hunting is seen as a viable way to keep numbers down. Too large a population and they cause problems for farmers and foresters, damaging a local ecosystem.

Controversial hunting restrictions on New York deer

Rescuing and Rehabilitating Chimps in MONA's Sanctuary

Rescuing and Rehabilitating Chimps in MONA's Sanctuary

Posted Wed, 22 Jun 2011 17:40:01 GMT by Julian Jackson

Animal rescue charity plans 10th anniversary celebration to raise funds. Chimpanzees are our nearest relative, and share many of our own traits: the need for family and companionship, a desire for status within the group, and sometimes volatile personal relationships with other chimps and the humans they encounter.

Rescuing and Rehabilitating Chimps in MONA's Sanctuary

More support needed for Arab World Heritage sites

More support needed for Arab World Heritage sites

Posted Wed, 22 Jun 2011 15:57:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

Only two natural sites located in Arab states have been added to the UNESCO World Heritage List in the past 15 years. A new report by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) found that Arab countries should propose more sites for inclusion on the list, as well as managing their existing sites more successfully.

More support needed for Arab World Heritage sites

Caribou collapse: look to oil-sands, not wolves, says new study

Caribou collapse: look to oil-sands, not wolves, says new study

Posted Wed, 22 Jun 2011 14:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Caribou in Alberta are falling foul, not to wolves, but instead to the stress of ongoing work to extract the one of the dirtiest of fossil fuels, oil-sands. That's one of the conclusions from a study published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, which recommends more sensitive placing of oil-infrastructure to ease pressure on the declining reindeer.

Caribou collapse: look to oil-sands, not wolves, says new study

Marine species at risk of mass extinction

Marine species at risk of mass extinction

Posted Tue, 21 Jun 2011 07:56:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

An unprecedented number of marine species are at risk of extinction. Increasing levels of CO2 contributes to rising temperatures. In turn, increased temperatures lead to more CO2 being absorbed into the ocean. Increased CO2 in the ocean leads to increasing ocean acidification and hypoxia, which are devastating for marine life.

Marine species at risk of mass extinction

Save the old men of the forest to house the forest's young

Save the old men of the forest to house the forest's young

Posted Sun, 19 Jun 2011 14:24:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

An old tree can support dozens of different nesting animals and birds who don't have the woodpecker's powers. Trees are a good thing for the environment right? Well, yes, but replacing old with new is bad news for a multitude of creatures that rely on the ravages of time to help them make a home in the trees.

Save the old men of the forest to house the forest's young

Protected species found on sale in Thai markets

Protected species found on sale in Thai markets

Posted Thu, 16 Jun 2011 13:22:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Madagascan species at risk of extinction are commonly found on sale in Thai markets says a WWF-backed body investigating the trade in endangered species. TRAFFIC surveyed sales for 15 days in Bangkok and eight of Thailand's provinces and found 591 Madagascan reptiles and amphibians available on sale.

Protected species found on sale in Thai markets

Are rats and bees the solution to Africa's bushmeat problem?

Are rats and bees the solution to Africa's bushmeat problem?

Posted Mon, 13 Jun 2011 19:48:00 GMT by Ruth Hendry

With the bushmeat trade growing annually, experts recognise that innovative solutions are required to halt this illegal activity. Commercial trading in bushmeat - the meat and other parts of wild mammals, birds and reptiles - is a highly lucrative industry, particularly prevalent in central Africa. Bushmeat trading is on the rise within many central African countries

Are rats and bees the solution to Africa's bushmeat problem?

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Ant eater lovers wanted

Posted Sun, 27 Jul 2014 10:29:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Diverse worlds of animals and plants disappearing

Posted Fri, 18 Jul 2014 10:45:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Gorillas see tourists by appointment

Posted Sun, 29 Jun 2014 08:39:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Sea change in Europe is slow

Posted Mon, 23 Jun 2014 06:50:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Satao, the elephant king, is killed

Posted Tue, 17 Jun 2014 07:10:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Virunga National Park safe - for now

Posted Thu, 12 Jun 2014 09:31:26 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Quoll story will unveil all marsupial ills?

Posted Sat, 31 May 2014 09:40:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Rare crocodile increasing with grassroots conservation

Posted Tue, 13 May 2014 14:18:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Whitley Wonders in Haiti and Ecuador (Awards)

Posted Sat, 10 May 2014 11:50:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Orcas' Hebridean overture

Posted Wed, 07 May 2014 07:43:00 GMT by Penny Bunting

Europe clears own waters of fish this week

Posted Mon, 04 Jul 2011 17:49:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

£100 million investment for UK river wildlife

Posted Wed, 13 Apr 2011 13:14:00 GMT by Laura Brown

Holidaymakers can help conserve leatherback turtles

Posted Thu, 11 Aug 2011 19:50:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Bluefin tuna at 'risk of collapse' without drastic action

Posted Thu, 07 Jul 2011 18:00:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Vulture Restaurants: Serving and Saving Vultures

Posted Tue, 27 Mar 2012 14:22:00 GMT by Atula Gupta

Osa Peninsula - The most biologically intense place on earth

Posted Tue, 29 May 2012 11:27:12 GMT by Nick St Clair

87 marine mammal species eaten in 114 countries since 1990

Posted Wed, 25 Jan 2012 13:29:28 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Caribou collapse: look to oil-sands, not wolves, says new study

Posted Wed, 22 Jun 2011 14:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

What is Happening to the Elephants?

Posted Fri, 18 Jan 2013 12:48:11 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Eels, Alps and Trees

Posted Wed, 29 May 2013 16:40:46 GMT by Dave Armstrong