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8,000 years of man made environmental impact

8,000 years of man made environmental impact

Posted Wed, 26 Jan 2011 08:00:01 GMT by Louise Murray

Man has been influencing Earth's climate for at least 8,000 years say Swiss researchers. The rise and fall of the Roman Empire; the Black Death, and the colonisation of the Americas all had a significant impact on the environment due to changes in forestation. Early man began by clearing woody areas to improve hunting and gathering opportunities. Next the first farmers had a larger impact by clearing forest for early slash and burn agriculture.

8,000 years of man made environmental impact

Falling ice and snow cover hampering Arctic's reflective capabilities

Falling ice and snow cover hampering Arctic's reflective capabilities

Posted Fri, 21 Jan 2011 15:38:00 GMT by David Hewitt

The degree to which the Arctic region can reflect the sun's rays has declined significantly over the past three decades, a team of US researchers have warned. The ongoing loss of snow and ice in the Northern Hemisphere is not just depriving polar bears of their natural habitat, but it is leading to a reduction of the region's solar reflexivity and thereby exacerbating the problem of global warming.

Falling ice and snow cover hampering Arctic's reflective capabilities

History may hold the key to future climate change consequences

History may hold the key to future climate change consequences

Posted Mon, 17 Jan 2011 09:30:01 GMT by David Hewitt

By looking to the past, one team of US scientists believe they can map out the likely changes to the Earth's climate ongoing rises in carbon emissions will bring. one team of US researchers has been looking to the past in order to gain an understanding of the potential consequences of the major rise in the volume of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere seen since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Specifically, the experts at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, have been asking: When was the last time the Earth's atmosphere contained as much carbon dioxide as it may by the end of this century?

History may hold the key to future climate change consequences

Smaller glaciers, not giant ice caps, tipped to push sea levels up

Smaller glaciers, not giant ice caps, tipped to push sea levels up

Posted Wed, 12 Jan 2011 10:50:01 GMT by David Hewitt

Melting mountain glaciers rather than the ice sheets of the Antarctic will be the biggest contributor to rising sea levels over the decades ahead, scientists believe. That climate scientists looking into rising sea levels are currently directing their research at the massive ice caps of the Arctic and the Antarctic is hardly surprising.

Smaller glaciers, not giant ice caps, tipped to push sea levels up

Lunch with a crunch - eco-friendly edible insects

Lunch with a crunch - eco-friendly edible insects

Posted Mon, 10 Jan 2011 14:36:28 GMT by Louise Murray

Scrap the beef, pork, and chicken from your diet if you want to improve your carbon footprint. Edible insects like mealworms, locusts and crickets produce a fraction of the greenhouse gases per kilo of protein than more conventional meals.

Lunch with a crunch - eco-friendly edible insects

Growth rings in deep sea corals reveal climate data

Growth rings in deep sea corals reveal climate data

Posted Mon, 10 Jan 2011 14:05:41 GMT by Louise Murray

Growth rings in fossil and living deep sea corals tell scientists about Atlantic Ocean currents and may provide clues to links between these and global warming. Like tree rings and ice cores, the annual growth rings in deep sea gorgonian corals can tell us about the past environment, and are a new and dependable source of data about the deep ocean. Dr Owen Sherwood, a biogeochemist and lead author of a new study spoke to Earth Times today

Growth rings in deep sea corals reveal climate data

Drilling for half a million years of history under the Dead Sea

Drilling for half a million years of history under the Dead Sea

Posted Thu, 06 Jan 2011 22:13:36 GMT by Michael Evans

A project to drill under the Dead Sea that will hopefully reveal half a million years of the areas's geological and climatic history. There is little doubt in scientific minds that the world is getting warmer. This is particularly evident in the Middle East, but one important question is whether this is something new or whether it is part of some larger cyclical pattern.

Drilling for half a million years of history under the Dead Sea

The effects of a colder Bering Sea on the feeding habits of pollock

The effects of a colder Bering Sea on the feeding habits of pollock

Posted Thu, 06 Jan 2011 21:56:01 GMT by Michael Evans

A three-year dip in Bering Sea temperature has caused a change in the distribution of the staple food of pollock. The Bering Sea is considered to be one of the world's most productive fisheries and its northern portions are the home of sea ducks, grey whales, bearded seals and walruses, but a 30-year warming trend has been bad news for those animals that are adapted to a cold-water environment, causing them to migrate further north.

The effects of a colder Bering Sea on the feeding habits of pollock

Burping cows depleting ozone layer, Irish study finds

Burping cows depleting ozone layer, Irish study finds

Posted Wed, 05 Jan 2011 13:00:47 GMT by Astrid Madsen

Burps, not farts, cause for methane production among cattle. Every cow, on average, produces 80kg to 100kg (CH4) of methane per year, a gas that has the nasty habit of depleting the ozone layer. The reason for this is enteric - in other words, it's related to digestion, but not in the way you might imagine.

Burping cows depleting ozone layer, Irish study finds

ICTs to help Africa cope with Climate change

ICTs to help Africa cope with Climate change

Posted Tue, 04 Jan 2011 09:11:16 GMT by Paromita Pain

In Africa, the effects of climate change are already being felt, primarily in the form of reduced rainfall and desertification. These effects could substantially alter farming, leading to food shortages. To mitigate such impacts of global warming, information and communication technologies (ICTs) may have an important role to play.

ICTs to help Africa cope with Climate change

Short-term weather extremes cause melting of Greenland Ice Sheet

Short-term weather extremes cause melting of Greenland Ice Sheet

Posted Wed, 29 Dec 2010 11:01:16 GMT by Michael Evans

New research indicates that short-term weather extremes and not global warming are the cause of Greenland ice sheet melt. Roughly 80 per cent of Greenland's land surface is hidden under an ice sheet consisting of layers of compressed snow. It is accepted that approximately 100 billion tonnes of this ice are lost each year as the sheet progressively shrinks.

Short-term weather extremes cause melting of Greenland Ice Sheet

Climate Talks Bring Progress in the Fight Against Global Warming

Climate Talks Bring Progress in the Fight Against Global Warming

Posted Wed, 29 Dec 2010 07:39:00 GMT by Kirsten E. Silven

Although some progress was made this year at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, there is still much more to be done in the fight to protect the environment. The event was held in Cancun, Mexico, and although there were no giant leaps made, the members left feeling more confident that they can work together in the future and eventually come to a binding global agreement on climate change.

Climate Talks Bring Progress in the Fight Against Global Warming

Glaciers in meltdown

Glaciers in meltdown

Posted Sun, 19 Dec 2010 08:43:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Glaciers are shrinking fastest in Alaska and Patagonia in South America states a new report from the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), thinning by 35 and 25 m since 1960. Almost half the world's population depends on rivers that originate in glaciers and snow.

Glaciers in meltdown

Secrets Under The Gulf

Secrets Under The Gulf

Posted Fri, 17 Dec 2010 08:35:01 GMT by Michael Evans

Research suggests that climate change 7500 years ago created the (Persian) Gulf and flooded out an early civilisation. The Persian Gulf, or 'The Gulf' as it is now known, is relatively young in geological terms, being created around 8,000 years ago, probably as a result of some historic climate change causing the Indian Ocean to swallow up the whole area.

Secrets Under The Gulf

Fire Disaster in Israel Blamed on Predicted Climate Change

Fire Disaster in Israel Blamed on Predicted Climate Change

Posted Fri, 17 Dec 2010 07:33:02 GMT by Michael Evans

Researcher blames devastating Israeli forest fire on predicted climate change. December 2010 will be remembered in Israel as the month of the disastrous fire that swept through the beautiful Carmel Mountains near Haifa. As fire raged through the area, a national disaster was declared and there was an international call for assistance.

Fire Disaster in Israel Blamed on Predicted Climate Change

New Monitoring System For Tasmania's Oceans

New Monitoring System For Tasmania's Oceans

Posted Thu, 16 Dec 2010 16:05:04 GMT by Emma McNeil

The rich waters of the oceans surrounding Tasmania are to be monitored by a new state-of-the-art system, including autonomous undersea robotic vehicles, as scientists work to gather more information about this remarkable aquatic region. The new system for monitoring and observing the waters around the island is coming from the new Australian Integrated Observing System.

New Monitoring System For Tasmania's Oceans

Climate News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

Feet get wet quicker now!

Posted Thu, 15 Jan 2015 14:10:09 GMT by Paul Robinson

Heat kills more when it is humid.

Posted Tue, 06 Jan 2015 18:37:00 GMT by JW Dowey

UK or Republican “deniers” are worst?

Posted Tue, 30 Dec 2014 13:10:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Methane danger in undersea permafrost .

Posted Wed, 24 Dec 2014 10:41:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Mama Mia Mantis

Posted Thu, 27 Nov 2014 11:37:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Use biodiversity to combat climate change!

Posted Fri, 14 Nov 2014 09:10:01 GMT by Paul Robinson

Our climate change is related to deep ocean currents and glaciations

Posted Mon, 27 Oct 2014 02:00:00 GMT by JW Dowey

If you can't stand the heat..

Posted Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:45:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Flood the Pacific islands or don't sell your coal!

Posted Sun, 19 Oct 2014 13:29:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Sea ice helps carbon absorption

Posted Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Unseasonal Floods - Climate Change?

Posted Wed, 22 Jun 2011 06:57:00 GMT by Michelle Simon

Sea cow teeth point to a wetter Eocene and a 'greenhouse earth'

Posted Thu, 21 Apr 2011 18:02:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Gauging the Effects of Climate Change on Corals and Coral Extinction

Posted Wed, 22 Feb 2012 00:33:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

A review of climatic history following a new look at Antarctic ice cores

Posted Mon, 21 Mar 2011 12:33:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Ice shelf collapse causes glacial surge

Posted Wed, 27 Jul 2011 14:50:00 GMT by Melanie J. Martin

Concentrate on cutting methane and soot to curb global warming

Posted Thu, 12 Jan 2012 18:09:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Arctic ice retreats to new minimum

Posted Tue, 13 Sep 2011 17:26:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Examining Ice Age Hominins' adaptability to Climate Change

Posted Thu, 17 Nov 2011 22:10:00 GMT by James Mathews

Did ice-melt in the Arctic dry up the Nile 16,000 years ago?

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 14:21:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Warm ocean currents and Antarctic ice loss

Posted Thu, 26 Apr 2012 11:37:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong