Earth Times Logo
RSS Feed Google+ Facebook Twitter Linked In Pinterest


Climate News

China not on board with CO2 - why a 16% cut means rising emissions

China not on board with CO2 - why a 16% cut means rising emissions

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 18:02:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

China's Premier pledged Sunday to cut carbon emissions intensity, by over 16% for the next 5 years. Whilst such a number sounds impressive, when it comes to global warming it's the total emissions that matter. There the story is not so promising. Whilst this pledge is part of a 20-year plan to reduce carbon intensity by 40-45% by 2020, relative to 2005, reducing the intensity of emissions is not the same as reducing total emissions.

China not on board with CO2 - why a 16% cut means rising emissions

Did ice-melt in the Arctic dry up the Nile 16,000 years ago?

Did ice-melt in the Arctic dry up the Nile 16,000 years ago?

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 14:21:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

In the recent past, melting events in the far north have had dramatic effects across continents further south, scientists say. A megadrought some 16,000 years ago dried up the Nile, and Africa's great lakes, according to a new paper in Science. This event may well have been linked to rapid glacial outpourings from North American ice sheets around the same time.

Did ice-melt in the Arctic dry up the Nile 16,000 years ago?

Climate change raises dust bowl specter for Southwest United States

Climate change raises dust bowl specter for Southwest United States

Posted Sun, 27 Feb 2011 12:36:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Droughts and dust storms are being predicted by government scientists studying plant growth and soil erosion in the Southwest United States. Scientists from the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of California, Los Angeles studied plants and soils in the Arches and Canyonlands National Parks of south east Utah over a 20 year period.

Climate change raises dust bowl specter for Southwest United States

Climategate: NOAA in the clear, time to reclaim the debate

Climategate: NOAA in the clear, time to reclaim the debate

Posted Fri, 25 Feb 2011 11:33:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

With the latest report from the Commerce Department clearing NOAA scientists of any wrong-doing in the Climategate affair, it's time to lay the ghost of those false accusations to rest. The way forward lies in a renewed and open dialogue with the public, to rebuild the trust eroded over the affair. As the reality of global warming continues to bite, the need to tell the story honestly and passionately is more apparent than ever.

Climategate: NOAA in the clear, time to reclaim the debate

'Climategate' story shook faith in global warming science

'Climategate' story shook faith in global warming science

Posted Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:10:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Weathercasters can be a trusted source for information on global warming but study finds their faith was rocked by 'Climategate' emails. The men and women who bring us our daily TV weather forecasts had their belief in global warming and faith in climate scientists damaged by the 'Climategate' scandal say researchers at George Mason University.

'Climategate' story shook faith in global warming science

The gender divide reaches climate change

The gender divide reaches climate change

Posted Sat, 19 Feb 2011 12:44:01 GMT by Rachel England

Studies indicate gender discrepancies in climate change. New research indicates that the gender divide has spilled over into the climate change debate, with a French report suggesting that men are bigger eco-offenders than women.

The gender divide reaches climate change

The world will get warmer, deal with it

The world will get warmer, deal with it

Posted Fri, 18 Feb 2011 13:48:00 GMT by David Hewitt

Even if all the world's factories shut down tomorrow and all the cars were taken off the roads, the planet would still get steadily warmer, scientists have warned. That is according to a team of scientists at the University of Washington who believe that, far from being just one of several possible future scenarios, a warmer global climate is now inevitable thanks to the sheer volume of carbon that has been released into the atmosphere since the start of the Industrial Revolution.

The world will get warmer, deal with it

Predicted long-term drought in the Horn of Africa

Predicted long-term drought in the Horn of Africa

Posted Tue, 15 Feb 2011 07:33:00 GMT by Michael Evans

Scientists predict that a warming Indian Ocean will create drought conditions in Kenya and Ethiopia. Regular droughts have long been regarded as a feature of eastern Africa, but over the past 20 years the frequency of these droughts has noticeably increased. According to new research published in Climate Dynamics, this is likely to continue as global temperatures continue to rise.

Predicted long-term drought in the Horn of Africa

Can plants evolve fast enough to cope with climate change?

Can plants evolve fast enough to cope with climate change?

Posted Mon, 14 Feb 2011 12:33:00 GMT by Louise Murray

New research in Australia gives real hope that plants can respond to climate change, by rapidly evolving. This is the first study, published in the Journal of Ecology that shows just how widespread this ability is in plants.

Can plants evolve fast enough to cope with climate change?

New farming methods to reduce greenhouse gases and improve yields

New farming methods to reduce greenhouse gases and improve yields

Posted Sun, 13 Feb 2011 12:25:00 GMT by Michael Evans

By drilling a field in foot wide strips, nine inches deep, and planting maize and adding nitrate fertiliser at the same time, this increases yields and reduces the amount of nitrate escaping into the atmosphere as nitrous oxide. Although carbon dioxide (CO2) is widely held to be the major contributor to global warming, scientists believe that the contribution of nitrous oxide (N2O) is about 300 times more than CO2.

New farming methods to reduce greenhouse gases and improve yields

Global warming can lead to a colder Britain

Global warming can lead to a colder Britain

Posted Fri, 11 Feb 2011 11:19:02 GMT by Michael Evans

Scientists believe that a shrinking Arctic ice cap is introducing warmer fresh water into the Atlantic to slow the warming effects of the Gulf Stream and cool down northwest Europe as a consequence. Britain has just suffered its coldest winter for 100 years, bringing freezing, snowy weather that paralysed the country. Scientists say that these icy winters could become a regular feature simply because the world is getting warmer.

Global warming can lead to a colder Britain

8,000 years of man made environmental impact

8,000 years of man made environmental impact

Posted Wed, 26 Jan 2011 08:00:01 GMT by Louise Murray

Man has been influencing Earth's climate for at least 8,000 years say Swiss researchers. The rise and fall of the Roman Empire; the Black Death, and the colonisation of the Americas all had a significant impact on the environment due to changes in forestation. Early man began by clearing woody areas to improve hunting and gathering opportunities. Next the first farmers had a larger impact by clearing forest for early slash and burn agriculture.

8,000 years of man made environmental impact

Falling ice and snow cover hampering Arctic's reflective capabilities

Falling ice and snow cover hampering Arctic's reflective capabilities

Posted Fri, 21 Jan 2011 15:38:00 GMT by David Hewitt

The degree to which the Arctic region can reflect the sun's rays has declined significantly over the past three decades, a team of US researchers have warned. The ongoing loss of snow and ice in the Northern Hemisphere is not just depriving polar bears of their natural habitat, but it is leading to a reduction of the region's solar reflexivity and thereby exacerbating the problem of global warming.

Falling ice and snow cover hampering Arctic's reflective capabilities

History may hold the key to future climate change consequences

History may hold the key to future climate change consequences

Posted Mon, 17 Jan 2011 09:30:01 GMT by David Hewitt

By looking to the past, one team of US scientists believe they can map out the likely changes to the Earth's climate ongoing rises in carbon emissions will bring. one team of US researchers has been looking to the past in order to gain an understanding of the potential consequences of the major rise in the volume of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere seen since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Specifically, the experts at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, have been asking: When was the last time the Earth's atmosphere contained as much carbon dioxide as it may by the end of this century?

History may hold the key to future climate change consequences

Smaller glaciers, not giant ice caps, tipped to push sea levels up

Smaller glaciers, not giant ice caps, tipped to push sea levels up

Posted Wed, 12 Jan 2011 10:50:01 GMT by David Hewitt

Melting mountain glaciers rather than the ice sheets of the Antarctic will be the biggest contributor to rising sea levels over the decades ahead, scientists believe. That climate scientists looking into rising sea levels are currently directing their research at the massive ice caps of the Arctic and the Antarctic is hardly surprising.

Smaller glaciers, not giant ice caps, tipped to push sea levels up

Lunch with a crunch - eco-friendly edible insects

Lunch with a crunch - eco-friendly edible insects

Posted Mon, 10 Jan 2011 14:36:28 GMT by Louise Murray

Scrap the beef, pork, and chicken from your diet if you want to improve your carbon footprint. Edible insects like mealworms, locusts and crickets produce a fraction of the greenhouse gases per kilo of protein than more conventional meals.

Lunch with a crunch - eco-friendly edible insects

Climate News Archives Page : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

Climate change and permafrost loss

Posted Mon, 24 Mar 2014 06:35:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Costing 21st Century coastal flooding

Posted Wed, 05 Feb 2014 14:16:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Winners and losers in the great warming!

Posted Fri, 03 Jan 2014 09:55:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Remember November? it was HOT

Posted Wed, 18 Dec 2013 08:00:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

COP19 descends to walk-outs

Posted Thu, 21 Nov 2013 10:16:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

The players on the Warsaw pitch

Posted Tue, 12 Nov 2013 10:55:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Floods connected with Arctic ice loss!

Posted Thu, 31 Oct 2013 07:49:32 GMT by JW Dowey

Sceptic tanks, of the non-thinking variety

Posted Wed, 02 Oct 2013 10:45:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

IPCC: A final breakthrough?

Posted Sun, 29 Sep 2013 12:10:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Sea change for shore habitats

Posted Fri, 20 Sep 2013 17:20:37 GMT by Paul Robinson

Fire in the north: burning tundra heralds new warming worries

Posted Wed, 27 Jul 2011 17:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Examining Ice Age Hominins' adaptability to Climate Change

Posted Thu, 17 Nov 2011 22:10:00 GMT by James Mathews

Farmer's count the cost of drought

Posted Thu, 16 Jun 2011 14:00:00 GMT by Laura Brown

COP 17: African Group negotiators protecting climate victims

Posted Wed, 30 Nov 2011 17:03:00 GMT by Michelle Simon

Patagonia glaciers now melting ten times faster

Posted Mon, 04 Apr 2011 11:50:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Did ice-melt in the Arctic dry up the Nile 16,000 years ago?

Posted Mon, 28 Feb 2011 14:21:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Narwhals used to explore frozen arctic waters

Posted Wed, 24 Nov 2010 11:40:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Fire Disaster in Israel Blamed on Predicted Climate Change

Posted Fri, 17 Dec 2010 07:33:02 GMT by Michael Evans

Geoengineering is a leap from the fire into the frying pan

Posted Sat, 23 Apr 2011 08:47:00 GMT by Martin Leggett