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Arctic coasts slipping away

Arctic coasts slipping away

Posted Sun, 17 Apr 2011 23:00:00 GMT by Louise Murray

A quarter of the Arctic's permafrost coastline is suffering from erosion due to climate change. The impact on settlements, shipping, oil and gas installations and coastal infrastructure is likely to grow. As ice free periods increase due to global warming, there is a direct effect on the fragile polar coastline which is largely composed of frozen permafrost.

Arctic coasts slipping away

Shifting from pasture to sugarcane cools Brazilian cerrado

Shifting from pasture to sugarcane cools Brazilian cerrado

Posted Sun, 17 Apr 2011 17:01:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Sugarcane in Brazil's cerrado can have a cooling double whammy. It helps to power private transport, with cane ethanol that has fewer greenhouse gas emissions - and now it has been shown to potentially help cool the local climes too. A paper to be published in Nature Climate Change, has measured the effects of switching from other crops and cattle to sugarcane - and the dense thickets of cane are better at reflecting sunlight, and cooling through water loss.

Shifting from pasture to sugarcane cools Brazilian cerrado

Damaged coastal wetlands means bad news for our climate

Damaged coastal wetlands means bad news for our climate

Posted Mon, 11 Apr 2011 18:39:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

A new World Bank report has found that drainage and degradation of coastal wetlands leads to decreased carbon sequestration and increased amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. If coastal wetlands are drained, for example to convert the land for agricultural use, they emit large amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere

Damaged coastal wetlands means bad news for our climate

Research casts light on planet's future

Research casts light on planet's future

Posted Mon, 11 Apr 2011 18:03:00 GMT by John Dean

The study of fossilised mollusks could give scientists an invaluable insight into the way the world will respond to climate change. Researchers at Californian university UCLA say that examining the fossils from 3.5 million years ago has allowed them to build a picture of how the world is reacting to current levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, a key contributor to global climate change.

Research casts light on planet's future

West Antarctica gets warmed from tropics via 'Rossby waves'

West Antarctica gets warmed from tropics via 'Rossby waves'

Posted Mon, 11 Apr 2011 15:11:02 GMT by Martin Leggett

A long train of low-and-high pressure areas, known as Rossby waves, are helping to channel increasing warmth in the equatorial Pacific over to the Antarctic - according to research in Nature Geoscience. That is also producing an increase in warming in Western Antarctica, which contains vast amounts of water locked in its thick ice-caps. Melting here could pump 15 feet of sea-level rise out across the globe.

West Antarctica gets warmed from tropics via 'Rossby waves'

Cities ill-prepared for climate change dangers

Cities ill-prepared for climate change dangers

Posted Sat, 09 Apr 2011 15:19:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Despite containing half the world's population, and being particularly vulnerable to climate change, most cities are failing to prepare themselves for the anticipated risks. That's the conclusion of a report in this month's Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability. The author concludes that a short-term pressures are swamping the long-term planning needed to safeguard cities from events such as tidal-flood surges or heat-waves.

Cities ill-prepared for climate change dangers

The world is getting windier

The world is getting windier

Posted Fri, 08 Apr 2011 15:27:00 GMT by Laura Brown

Australian researchers discover the world is getting windier and waves higher. Using five techniques to independently measure the figures, they found the speeds of the fastest winds have increased by around half a percent. The height of the biggest waves has risen by between a quarter and half a percent.

The world is getting windier

Leaf rot slows after droughts, hindering plant growth

Leaf rot slows after droughts, hindering plant growth

Posted Wed, 06 Apr 2011 12:25:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

With hotter, driers summers, tree leaves don't only shrivel - they produce more tannins, which changes the way that they rot over the autumn. New research published in New Phytologist suggests this subdues plant growth in the drought's aftermath, so extending the knock-back from dry-period. It also causes subtle inter-plays in the carbon cycle, which have yet to be teased apart.

Leaf rot slows after droughts, hindering plant growth

Arctic ozone hole moving south

Arctic ozone hole moving south

Posted Wed, 06 Apr 2011 08:37:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Unusual atmospheric conditions during the last Arctic winter have opened a massive hole in the ozone layer and that hole is extending into the more densely populated latitudes of northern Europe. Ozone depleted air masses are moving south from the Arctic and have reached Finland. They are expected to move as far east as the Russian-Chinese border and perhaps as far south as the Mediterranean.

Arctic ozone hole moving south

Patagonia glaciers now melting ten times faster

Patagonia glaciers now melting ten times faster

Posted Mon, 04 Apr 2011 11:50:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

A new study, published in the current issue of Nature Geoscience, has been able to measure the rate of Patagonia glacier loss over the last several hundred years. The team of scientists, from Britain and Sweden, has found that current melting rates are ten times faster than newly measured historical rates. With temperatures in the region rising fast, in line with global warming climate model projections, it seems the death of Patagonia's glaciers has man's hand behind it.

Patagonia glaciers now melting ten times faster

Erratic boulders indicate past antarctic ice sheet behaviour

Erratic boulders indicate past antarctic ice sheet behaviour

Posted Sun, 03 Apr 2011 13:11:00 GMT by Tamara Croes

Scientists from Leeds and Aberystwyth University recently discovered that rocks displaced by the Antarctic Ice Sheet are found on James Ross Island, indicating that the sheet must have expanded this far earlier.

Erratic boulders indicate past antarctic ice sheet behaviour

Slow-onset climate change could have 'potentially catastrophic' long-term impact on food production in the developed world

Slow-onset climate change could have 'potentially catastrophic' long-term impact on food production in the developed world

Posted Fri, 01 Apr 2011 15:31:00 GMT by Benjamin Kerry

The FAO has warned of the ''potentially catastrophic'' future impact on food production in the developing world by 'slow-onset' climate change. But doour governments presently take too much of a short-term approach to such changes? Andhow can we prepare for them to make developing world food production more resilient whilst managing the trade-offs?

Slow-onset climate change could have 'potentially catastrophic' long-term impact on food production in the developed world

Label carbon content says new study

Label carbon content says new study

Posted Tue, 29 Mar 2011 14:31:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Carbon labelling will help consumers more accurately reflect their green intention says new research and producers will cut energy use and boost their environmental credentials too. Thomas Dietz, a sociology professor from Michigan State University, publishes his research in the new edition of Nature Climate Change and says carbon labelling will help reduce carbon emissions.

Label carbon content says new study

Jet contrails major contributor to aviation's effect on climate

Jet contrails major contributor to aviation's effect on climate

Posted Tue, 29 Mar 2011 10:01:01 GMT by Louise Murray

Cirrus clouds generated from the contrails of jets may be the cause of more atmospheric warming today than all the CO2 emitted by the aviation industry since the beginning of flight. Aviation is responsible for about 5% of man-made climate change effects, and that proportion could triple by 2050 according to some projections. Least understood is the role of aircraft exhausts in forming clouds.

Jet contrails major contributor to aviation's effect on climate

Melting icebergs linked to carbon dioxide absorption

Melting icebergs linked to carbon dioxide absorption

Posted Sun, 27 Mar 2011 16:29:00 GMT by Lucy Brake

Scientists have discovered that the movement and melting of icebergs plays an important role in distributing phytoplankton and consequently absorbing and removing carbon dioxide from the oceans. The new findings have major implications for global climate research and management.

Melting icebergs linked to carbon dioxide absorption

Cut CO2 and the rains will flow

Cut CO2 and the rains will flow

Posted Sat, 26 Mar 2011 18:39:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Decreasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere causes more rain to be wrung from the clouds, according to research published in Geophysical Research Letters. That change in rainfall can go both ways, with decreasing precipitation as CO2 levels rise - and it happens faster than the overall global change in temperature.

Cut CO2 and the rains will flow

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Bigger Ideas on Climate Change

Posted Wed, 04 Mar 2015 10:06:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Planktonic growth and fishy futures.

Posted Wed, 25 Feb 2015 11:30:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Feet get wet quicker now!

Posted Thu, 15 Jan 2015 14:10:09 GMT by Paul Robinson

Heat kills more when it is humid.

Posted Tue, 06 Jan 2015 18:37:00 GMT by JW Dowey

UK or Republican “deniers” are worst?

Posted Tue, 30 Dec 2014 13:10:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Methane danger in undersea permafrost .

Posted Wed, 24 Dec 2014 10:41:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Mama Mia Mantis

Posted Thu, 27 Nov 2014 11:37:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Use biodiversity to combat climate change!

Posted Fri, 14 Nov 2014 09:10:01 GMT by Paul Robinson

Our climate change is related to deep ocean currents and glaciations

Posted Mon, 27 Oct 2014 02:00:00 GMT by JW Dowey

If you can't stand the heat..

Posted Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:45:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Blue Carbon estimates up!

Posted Mon, 10 Sep 2012 10:51:28 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Label carbon content says new study

Posted Tue, 29 Mar 2011 14:31:00 GMT by Colin Ricketts

China's double-edged climate weapon

Posted Wed, 06 Jul 2011 13:21:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Temperature, Oxygen and Acidification in the Oceans

Posted Sun, 03 Mar 2013 18:39:54 GMT by Dave Armstrong

River water hundreds of miles off course

Posted Fri, 06 Jan 2012 11:52:00 GMT by Adrian Bishop

Arctic ozone hole moving south

Posted Wed, 06 Apr 2011 08:37:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Flood and fire - climate change warnings from Irene and Texas?

Posted Tue, 06 Sep 2011 14:03:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Arctic scythe laying the ice-sheets low

Posted Tue, 29 Nov 2011 21:20:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

The gender divide reaches climate change

Posted Sat, 19 Feb 2011 12:44:01 GMT by Rachel England

Melting Antarctic ice and sea levels

Posted Fri, 09 May 2014 14:41:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong