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Food harvests dragged lower by global warming

Food harvests dragged lower by global warming

Posted Thu, 05 May 2011 18:11:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Harvests of corn and wheat are already wilting under the rising temperatures seen since 1980, says a team from Stanford University. They publish their study results - which looks at what crop yields would have have been without climate change - today in Science Express. In contrast, rice and soya crops, and US farmers in general, are so far weathering the global warming storm - but that may be about to change.

Food harvests dragged lower by global warming

Europe's climate fate decided by tussle between oceanic currents

Europe's climate fate decided by tussle between oceanic currents

Posted Wed, 27 Apr 2011 17:00:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

A new player in Europe's climate change story, as global warming continues its relentless rise, has been suggested by a paper in today's Nature. The 'Agulhas leakage' of warm salty waters from the Indian Ocean, appears to be increasing, says the study - and that could help prevent the predicted slow-down of the North Atlantic Drift.

Europe's climate fate decided by tussle between oceanic currents

Driest March for 50 years in UK prompts fears of summer drought

Driest March for 50 years in UK prompts fears of summer drought

Posted Wed, 27 Apr 2011 13:07:00 GMT by Laura Brown

A drop in rainfall in March means water companies may be forced to bring in restrictions in the summer. Parts of the country had as little as 2mm of rain last month prompting warnings of potential droughts during the summer months. The dry month has led to a depletion in reservoir levels.

Driest March for 50 years in UK prompts fears of summer drought

Ozone Hole Over the Arctic is of Record Proportions

Ozone Hole Over the Arctic is of Record Proportions

Posted Mon, 25 Apr 2011 12:31:00 GMT by Mike Campbell

The phenomenon of a ''hole'' in the ozone blanket that covers the earth at polar latitudes was first discovered in 1985 by scientists from the British Antarctic Survey. The ''hole'' was a cylinder of the atmosphere, forming over polar regions, where the level of ozone in the atmospheric column was depleted.

Ozone Hole Over the Arctic is of Record Proportions

Geoengineering is a leap from the fire into the frying pan

Geoengineering is a leap from the fire into the frying pan

Posted Sat, 23 Apr 2011 08:47:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Recent geoengineering conferences have raised the profile of how we might tackle global warming with a Plan B - finding ways to cool the planet down, whilst trying to agree on how to cut those pesky CO2 emissions. But could the Plan B of geoengineering be a dangerous distraction that ultimately locks us into a series of even greater risks?

Geoengineering is a leap from the fire into the frying pan

Sea cow teeth point to a wetter Eocene and a 'greenhouse earth'

Sea cow teeth point to a wetter Eocene and a 'greenhouse earth'

Posted Thu, 21 Apr 2011 18:02:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Sea cow teeth from 50 million years ago are helping scientists to flesh out the climate of the earth during the Eocene, a time when greenhouse conditions reined supreme. Their paper, published today in Science, confirms that very wet conditions extended right down to the tropics, where rainfall rates were much greater than that seen today.

Sea cow teeth point to a wetter Eocene and a 'greenhouse earth'

Ozone hole's long reach brings climate change to the tropics

Ozone hole's long reach brings climate change to the tropics

Posted Thu, 21 Apr 2011 18:00:02 GMT by Martin Leggett

The ozone hole over Antarctica could be causing the tropics to have wetter summers, increasing flooding and landslide risks, according to recent research published today in Science. A team from Columbia University has found that the ozone hole is helping to shift the jet streams south, making parts of the tropics much rainier than they were before. The results imply it is not just greenhouse gases that can change the climate.

Ozone hole's long reach brings climate change to the tropics

Rapid increase in ice loss from the Canadian Arctic

Rapid increase in ice loss from the Canadian Arctic

Posted Wed, 20 Apr 2011 18:00:00 GMT by Louise Murray

The vast Canadian archipelago of Arctic islands, the territory of Nunavut, covers an area the size of western Europe. New research shows that the melting ice caps and glaciers there play a much greater role in global sea level rise than previously believed - 1mm in only 6 years.

Rapid increase in ice loss from the Canadian Arctic

Arctic coasts slipping away

Arctic coasts slipping away

Posted Sun, 17 Apr 2011 23:00:00 GMT by Louise Murray

A quarter of the Arctic's permafrost coastline is suffering from erosion due to climate change. The impact on settlements, shipping, oil and gas installations and coastal infrastructure is likely to grow. As ice free periods increase due to global warming, there is a direct effect on the fragile polar coastline which is largely composed of frozen permafrost.

Arctic coasts slipping away

Shifting from pasture to sugarcane cools Brazilian cerrado

Shifting from pasture to sugarcane cools Brazilian cerrado

Posted Sun, 17 Apr 2011 17:01:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

Sugarcane in Brazil's cerrado can have a cooling double whammy. It helps to power private transport, with cane ethanol that has fewer greenhouse gas emissions - and now it has been shown to potentially help cool the local climes too. A paper to be published in Nature Climate Change, has measured the effects of switching from other crops and cattle to sugarcane - and the dense thickets of cane are better at reflecting sunlight, and cooling through water loss.

Shifting from pasture to sugarcane cools Brazilian cerrado

Damaged coastal wetlands means bad news for our climate

Damaged coastal wetlands means bad news for our climate

Posted Mon, 11 Apr 2011 18:39:01 GMT by Ruth Hendry

A new World Bank report has found that drainage and degradation of coastal wetlands leads to decreased carbon sequestration and increased amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. If coastal wetlands are drained, for example to convert the land for agricultural use, they emit large amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere

Damaged coastal wetlands means bad news for our climate

Research casts light on planet's future

Research casts light on planet's future

Posted Mon, 11 Apr 2011 18:03:00 GMT by John Dean

The study of fossilised mollusks could give scientists an invaluable insight into the way the world will respond to climate change. Researchers at Californian university UCLA say that examining the fossils from 3.5 million years ago has allowed them to build a picture of how the world is reacting to current levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, a key contributor to global climate change.

Research casts light on planet's future

West Antarctica gets warmed from tropics via 'Rossby waves'

West Antarctica gets warmed from tropics via 'Rossby waves'

Posted Mon, 11 Apr 2011 15:11:02 GMT by Martin Leggett

A long train of low-and-high pressure areas, known as Rossby waves, are helping to channel increasing warmth in the equatorial Pacific over to the Antarctic - according to research in Nature Geoscience. That is also producing an increase in warming in Western Antarctica, which contains vast amounts of water locked in its thick ice-caps. Melting here could pump 15 feet of sea-level rise out across the globe.

West Antarctica gets warmed from tropics via 'Rossby waves'

Cities ill-prepared for climate change dangers

Cities ill-prepared for climate change dangers

Posted Sat, 09 Apr 2011 15:19:01 GMT by Martin Leggett

Despite containing half the world's population, and being particularly vulnerable to climate change, most cities are failing to prepare themselves for the anticipated risks. That's the conclusion of a report in this month's Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability. The author concludes that a short-term pressures are swamping the long-term planning needed to safeguard cities from events such as tidal-flood surges or heat-waves.

Cities ill-prepared for climate change dangers

The world is getting windier

The world is getting windier

Posted Fri, 08 Apr 2011 15:27:00 GMT by Laura Brown

Australian researchers discover the world is getting windier and waves higher. Using five techniques to independently measure the figures, they found the speeds of the fastest winds have increased by around half a percent. The height of the biggest waves has risen by between a quarter and half a percent.

The world is getting windier

Leaf rot slows after droughts, hindering plant growth

Leaf rot slows after droughts, hindering plant growth

Posted Wed, 06 Apr 2011 12:25:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

With hotter, driers summers, tree leaves don't only shrivel - they produce more tannins, which changes the way that they rot over the autumn. New research published in New Phytologist suggests this subdues plant growth in the drought's aftermath, so extending the knock-back from dry-period. It also causes subtle inter-plays in the carbon cycle, which have yet to be teased apart.

Leaf rot slows after droughts, hindering plant growth

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Our climate change is related to deep ocean currents and glaciations

Posted Mon, 27 Oct 2014 02:00:00 GMT by JW Dowey

If you can't stand the heat..

Posted Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:45:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Flood the Pacific islands or don't sell your coal!

Posted Sun, 19 Oct 2014 13:29:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Sea ice helps carbon absorption

Posted Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:59:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Climate change affects islands, but one snail hangs on.

Posted Tue, 09 Sep 2014 09:14:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

Soil carbon is lost with global warming

Posted Thu, 04 Sep 2014 09:52:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

WMO and others at Montreal climate change conference

Posted Fri, 22 Aug 2014 11:30:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Trees lose out to climate change

Posted Fri, 15 Aug 2014 10:01:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Relicts are natural ecological laboratories

Posted Wed, 13 Aug 2014 06:11:00 GMT by Dave Armstrong

Oceania sinks, and like New Zealand, we have to help

Posted Tue, 12 Aug 2014 05:48:00 GMT by Paul Robinson

British weather watch

Posted Fri, 27 Apr 2012 07:10:00 GMT by Michael Evans

CO2 storage is super safe say scientists

Posted Tue, 13 Sep 2011 17:01:01 GMT by Colin Ricketts

Sea-level rise with coastal and political operations

Posted Thu, 06 Sep 2012 15:12:01 GMT by Dave Armstrong

IPCC: A final breakthrough?

Posted Sun, 29 Sep 2013 12:10:00 GMT by JW Dowey

Rapid increase in ice loss from the Canadian Arctic

Posted Wed, 20 Apr 2011 18:00:00 GMT by Louise Murray

The canary is tweeting - Arctic winter ice ties lowest level ever

Posted Thu, 24 Mar 2011 14:06:00 GMT by Martin Leggett

New Monitoring System For Tasmania's Oceans

Posted Thu, 16 Dec 2010 16:05:04 GMT by Emma McNeil

More ice leaving polar ice sheets than ever before

Posted Thu, 10 Mar 2011 17:34:01 GMT by Louise Murray

Arctic coasts slipping away

Posted Sun, 17 Apr 2011 23:00:00 GMT by Louise Murray

Cancun Climate Conference: Extreme heat events will be the norm

Posted Thu, 02 Dec 2010 08:50:00 GMT by Lucy Brake